Return to the Fayetteville State University Home Page

Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015

CatalogUndergraduateCourse Descriptions

Course Descriptions - Undergraduate

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

ACCT 211  (3-3-0)  Principles of Accounting I: An introduction to financial accounting. A study of the basic concepts of accounting, the accounting cycle and preparation of financial statements, and the analysis and recording of transactions for operating, investing, and financing activities.
Prerequisite: MATH 121 Or MATH 123
View Book Information

ACCT 212  (3-3-0)  Principles of Accounting II: An introduction to managerial accounting. A study of the uses of financial statements, the study of manufacturing operations, and the uses of accounting information by management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211
View Book Information

ACCT 300  (3-3-0)  Accounting Information Systems: This course provides basic knowledge of how accounting information systems function in business organizations. Transaction flowcharting and internal controls of the revenue, expenditure, and conversion cycles are covered in detail. Attention is also focused on basic computer terminology, EDP controls, and relational databases.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 with a minimum grade of B And ACCT 212 with a minimum grade of B
View Book Information

ACCT 310  (3-3-0)  Managerial Accounting: A continuation of ACCT 212. A study of cost terms; cost behavior; systems design; and the analysis, interpretation, and application of accounting data by management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ACCT 212
View Book Information

ACCT 311  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Accounting I: A continuation of ACCT 212. A study of cost terms; cost behavior; systems design; and the analysis, interpretation, and application of accounting data by management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 with a minimum grade of B
View Book Information

ACCT 312  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Accounting II: A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. An in-depth study of accounting for investing and financing activities, leases, income taxes, and pensions.
Prerequisite: ACCT 311
View Book Information

ACCT 320  (3-0-0)  Federal and State Income Taxes: A survey of basic tax laws and the determination of taxable income for individuals; introduction to tax research.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 with a minimum grade of B And ACCT 212 with a minimum grade of B
View Book Information

ACCT 321  (3-3-0)  Cost Accounting: A study of the various cost concepts: accumulation of product costs, joint costs in job order and process cost systems, including analysis of variances for managerial control and decision making, direct and variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis; the buy or make decision.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 with a minimum grade of B And ACCT 212 with a minimum grade of B
View Book Information

ACCT 322  (3-3-0)  Advanced Cost Accounting: A continuation of ACCT 321: budgets and analyses of costs and other variances for management action; capital budgeting, and operations management and yield variances.
Prerequisite: ACCT 321
View Book Information

ACCT 411  (3-3-0)  Advanced Accounting: Accounting and reporting for investment activities of business. Issues related to foreign currency, accounting diversity, disaggregated information, reorganizations, and liquidations.
Prerequisite: ACCT 312
View Book Information

ACCT 412  (3-3-0)  Government and Public Accounting: A study of accounting for non-profit entities, including local, state, and federal government units; educational institutions; hospitals and other health care organizations; and welfare organizations. The course covers the classification and use of funds in such entities, including budgeting, purchasing and financial activities, and the presentation of financial reports by these types of organizations.
Prerequisite: ACCT 312
View Book Information

ACCT 420  (3-3-0)  Advanced Federal Income Taxes: A continuation of ACCT 320: tax laws applicable to corporations, partnerships, trusts, estates, gift tax, and tax planning; substantive research work resulting in formal reports.
Prerequisite: ACCT 320
View Book Information

ACCT 422  (3-3-0)  Auditing: This course covers the conceptual and practical aspects of the examination of financial statements by independent accountants. Issues examined include: objectives and techniques of internal control; standards of presentation and disclosure in financial statements; objectives and procedures for auditing practice; statistical sampling techniques; and auditing of EDP records.
Prerequisite: ACCT 300 And ACCT 312
View Book Information

ACCT 424  (3-3-0)  Financial Statement Analysis: This course is a study of the process of business analysis through the evaluation of financial statements. Topics include analysis of financial statements and ratio, strategic, prospective, equity, and credit analysis. This course presumes an understanding of accounting principles in order to successfully master the course content. While some accounting concepts may be reviewed, this course is about the analysis and evaluation of financial information based on Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Students must be able to express the analysis of cases and other course work in writing that meets professional standards. This course is cross listed with FINC 424.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ACCT 212 with a grade of "B" or better And FINC 311 with a grade of "C" or better
View Book Information

ACCT 425  (3-3-0)  Forensic and Fraud Analysis: This course helps students understand the principles of forensic accounting and fraud examination. Students will learn how and why financial fraud occurs and techniques to identify and investigate these frauds. Topics include fraud prevention, fraud detection, fraud investigation, management fraud, and other key forensic topics.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ACCT 212
View Book Information

ACCT 430  (3-3-0)  Accounting Theory: A study of contemporary financial accounting issues, emphasizing the role of accounting theory in accounting policy decisions; the social, political, and economic influences on the establishment of accounting standards; and the history of the accounting profession and accounting thought.
Prerequisite: ACCT 312
View Book Information

ACCT 450  (3-3-0)  Accounting Internship: This course provides students with practical experience in the field of accounting in private and public organizations (including industry). Formal class meetings before and after the internship are required to evaluate the work experience of students. The program must be arranged in advance and approved by the department chairperson. This course is not open to students with credit from any similar program in the institution.
View Book Information

ADMS 320  (3-3-0)  Administrative Services: This course is designed to provide for the development of basic desktop publishing concepts and skills which include the essentials of production and design, type and layout, and graphics and text for business and technical applications.
Prerequisite: BEDU 110
View Book Information

ANTH 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Anthropology: An introduction to the history and methods of anthropology, with special emphasis on early hominid and cultural evolution, the comparative study of social institutions, and the nature of cultural differences as they exist in traditional and modern societies.
View Book Information

ANTH 310  (3-3-0)  Cross-Cultural Studies in Anthropology: This course is designed to introduce students to the major intellectual, practical, methodological, and ethical concepts of cultural anthropology. Students will examine in-depth anthropological concepts of culture, behaviors, and belief systems. The goal of this course is to provide a comparative analysis of the cultural differences in human adaptations, the appreciation of diverse values and lifestyles, and the application of the cross-cultural study of people throughout the world.
Prerequisite: ANTH 210 Or SOCI 150 Or SOCI 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

ARSS 111  (1-1-2)  Foundation of the USAF I: ARSS 111 is a survey course designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
View Book Information

ARSS 112  (1-1-2)  Foundations of the USAF II: ARSS 112 is a continuation of ARSS 111.
View Book Information

ARSS 211  (1-1-2)  Evolution of Air and Space Power: This course is designed to examine the general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course provides the cadets with a knowledge level understanding for the general element and employment of air and space power, from an institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. In addition, the students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values, through the use of operational examples and historical Air Force leaders, and will continue to develop their communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.
View Book Information

ARSS 212  (1-1-2)  Evolution Air and Space Power II: ARSS 212 is a continuation of ARSS 211.
View Book Information

ARSS 311  (3-3-2)  Air Force Leadership Studies I: This course guides the student through a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
View Book Information

ARSS 312  (3-3-2)  Air Force Leadership Study II: ARSS 312 is a continuation of ARSS 311.
View Book Information

ARSS 411  (3-3-0)  National Security Affairs and Prep Ac: ARSS 411 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining verbal and written communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course.
View Book Information

ARSS 412  (3-3-2)  National Security Affairs and Prep II: ARSS 412 is a continuation of ARSS 411.
View Book Information

ARSS 421  (1-0-3)  Physical Education and Training: This course is designed to introduce the student to physical fitness and the regulations and components of the Air Force Physical Fitness Assessment. Information on various topics contributing to a fit lifestyle (such as nutrition and hydration, the benefits of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, running shoe selection, etc.) will be interwoven throughout the course. The course will involve calisthenics, introduction to various sports, and running.
View Book Information

ARSS 422  (1-0-3)  Physical Education and Training: This course is designed to introduce the student to physical fitness and the regulations and components of the Air Force Physical Fitness Assessment. Information on various topics contributing to a fit lifestyle (such as nutrition and hydration, the benefits of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, running shoe selection, etc.) will be interwoven throughout the course. The course will involve calisthenics, introduction to various sports, and running.
View Book Information

ART 110  (3-0-6)  2D Design: An introductory course in two-dimensional design. It provides a basic understanding of elements and principles of design as they relate to drawing, painting, and the graphics arts.
View Book Information

ART 121  (3-0-6)  Basic Drawing: The study of basic principles of freehand drawing. This course emphasizes the elements and principles of art through self-expression and utilizes a variety of drawing media.
View Book Information

ART 123  (3-0-6)  Basic Digital Design: This course is a basic introduction of computer-based skills in the area of visual design. Limited graphic skills will be introduced to assist in self-marketing, advertising techniques, layout, and computer generated images.
View Book Information

ART 150  (3-3-0)  Manga and Sequential Art in World Culture: A survey course examining works of sequential storytelling, Manga, graphic novels, and related formats throughout history. These works from various global cultures will be examined and discussed with a focus on major stylistic developments, intellectual movements, and cultural heritage and identity. Discussion will include the dissemination of these materials and the manner in which this demonstrates interdependence and communication among global cultures. The course will incorporate analysis of the materials, representing specific cultural concepts as they relate to international use of genres and social ideals.
View Book Information

ART 210  (3-3-0)  Survey of Art: A general study of the visual arts and their use in business, industry, education, leisure activities, and culture.
View Book Information

ART 211  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Art History: A study of the history of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts, with an historical summary of art form developments in various cultures.
View Book Information

ART 212  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Painting: The study of theories, methods, and painting techniques for landscapes, still-lifes, and varied compositions with special emphasis on the elements and principles of art in painting.
Prerequisite: ART 121
View Book Information

ART 215  (3-3-0)  Survey of Global Art: An art survey course exploring artistic traditions, forms, and achievements from around the world. Students shall examine underlying cultural, social, and aesthetic developments outside western classical traditions, thereby drawing new perspectives on global literacy and cultural appreciation. Specific course content will focus primarily on the research of artists, signature movements, artworks, and processes.
View Book Information

ART 222  (3-3-0)  Advanced Drawing: The study of compositional development through experimental drawing. This course emphasizes the technical expansion of drawing techniques with varied drawing media and subjects.
Prerequisite: ART 121
View Book Information

ART 223  (3-0-6)  Figure Drawing I: An in-depth investigation of the figure as a means of exploring drawing as depiction, organizational device, metaphor and object. Students will explore various dry and mixed media such as pastel, color pencil, collage techniques. This course is designed for the advanced art major who seeks to master observation, interpretation, and foundation skills in figure drawing.
Prerequisite: ART 121
View Book Information

ART 226  (3-0-6)  Typography: This course will provide discussion and exploration of the basic rules and principles of type as an artistic, mechanical, and advertising medium.
Prerequisite: ART 123
View Book Information

ART 230  (3-0-6)  Introduction to Ceramics: The study and use of ceramic processes and techniques, including: hand forming, molding, introduction to wheel throwing, glaze utilization, and kiln operation.
View Book Information

ART 231  (3-0-6)  Introduction to Sculpture: A course which introduces basic three dimensional design principles and the application of those principles in a variety of traditional sculpture techniques.
View Book Information

ART 250  (3-0-6)  Digital Photography: This course will cover digital photography and professional lighting techniques needed to produce commercial print and web images for promotional, retail signage, advertising and marketing themes, and business applications.
View Book Information

ART 253  (3-0-6)  Introduction to Printmaking: An introduction to printmaking processes, including history, development, and techniques. Two traditional categories of printmaking, the relief print and intaglio, are introduced and practiced. Using techniques in each category, students will practice reductive and additive processes; work in black and white and color; and understand the registration and printing of multiple matrixes. Traditional and experimental approaches are encouraged. Serigraphy and lithography are demonstrated by the instructor.
Prerequisite: ART 110 And ART 121
View Book Information

ART 310  (3-1-5)  Creative Art Experiences for Young Children: A study of the planning and organization of creative art activities for children from kindergarten through the third grade.
View Book Information

ART 311  (3-0-6)  Arts and Crafts: An introduction to simple sculptured forms, construction, printing, carving, weaving, modeling, and lettering, and to the handling of such materials as wood, metal, clay, fabrics, and paper.
View Book Information

ART 312  (3-0-6)  Drawing and Painting: An introduction to the fundamentals of landscape, still life, and portrait drawing and painting, with special emphasis on line, form, texture, and color in objective and non-objective art.
Prerequisite: ART 212
View Book Information

ART 313  (3-0-6)  Figure Drawing II: This course focuses on the figure as a central motif in the manipulation of space and pictorial investigation. Students will explore various wet pigment and dry media such as ink, watercolor, acrylic, and oil pigments. This course is designed for the advanced art major concentrating on mastering interpretative and technical aspects concerns of figurative representation.
Prerequisite: ART 121
View Book Information

ART 321  (3-3-0)  Ancient to Medieval Art: This course provides a detailed examination of visual art from ancient to medieval times. Students explore architecture, sculpture, and painting in relation to, background history, traditions, and cultural attributes. Museum and gallery visits, photographic slide presentations, and lectures will be integral elements in the course.
View Book Information

ART 322  (3-3-0)  Renaissance to Modern Art: This course provides a detailed examination of visual art from the Renaissance to the modern period. Students explore architecture, sculpture and painting in relation to, background history, traditions, and cultural attributes of art forms. Museum and gallery visits, photographic slide presentations, and lectures will be integral elements in the course.
View Book Information

ART 330  (3-0-6)  Computer Imaging in Visual art: This course investigates the concept and techniques of applying computer imaging to fine art. Macintosh and IBM computers will be used to generate desktop publishing from creative graphics. Focus will be given to the leading graphic software applications.
Prerequisite: ART 110 And ART 121
View Book Information

ART 331  (3-0-6)  Color Theory and Techniques: The study of color theories, color harmonies, and the orchestration of colors in design composition and nature to express symbolic, psychological, and aesthetic ideas.
Prerequisite: ART 110
View Book Information

ART 340  (3-3-0)  Woman, Culture, and Imaging: This course focuses on how Western aesthetics and cultural ideology have shaped women's relationships to the visual arts from the medieval period to the present.
View Book Information

ART 341  (3-0-5)  Leathercraft: A course in the design and production of craft projects fashioned in leather or with leather decoration.
View Book Information

ART 351  (3-0-6)  Commercial Photography: Teaches the student all aspects of commercial photography and its practices including lighting techniques. Current trends in business practices for the photographic industry will be covered as well as small business techniques as they relate to photography.
View Book Information

ART 352  (3-0-6)  Commercial Art: A study of working theories and practical applications of design linked to the sale or promotion of a product or commodity. Skills developed include fashion design, cartooning, illustrating, lettering, and package design, as well as photographic, and airbrush techniques.
Prerequisite: ART 110 And ART 121 And ART 330
View Book Information

ART 354  (3-0-6)  Advanced Printmaking: This course moves the student into technical areas of printing to include the following: photo-silk screening, creative techniques in screening, and other advanced techniques.
Prerequisite: ART 110 And ART 121 And ART 353
View Book Information

ART 355  (3-0-6)  Multi-Media Print: A course designed to explore and combine traditional printmaking techniques with digital, computer generated, and other photo-based technologies.
Prerequisite: ART 353
View Book Information

ART 361  (3-3-0)  African Art: An introduction to the regional art of Africa, with attention given to historical, sociological, and theological backgrounds.
View Book Information

ART 362  (3-3-0)  African-American Art from 1800: A survey of works by African-American artists, including an investigation of the historical and environmental influences on contemporary black art.
View Book Information

ART 363  (3-3-0)  Contemporary Art: A study of late modern art to the present, the course is an analysis of works of art in their historical, social, and cultural context. Artists and works of art are examined within periods and style, influential art theories, the art market, and changes in consumer society.
Prerequisite: ART 322
View Book Information

ART 365  (3-3-0)  History of Photography: The history of photography is traced from its inception to modern times. The advent of the camera and a prognostication of its destiny are contemplated. The course includes lecture, darkroom laboratory work, and field experience. Color, black and white, and digital photography are included. Photographic essay and thesis are required.
View Book Information

ART 366  (3-0-6)  Introduction to Metals: An introduction to metal sculpture using basic fabrication and casting techniques. Beginning metal fabrication includes the development of design concepts, as well as techniques for cutting, forming, welding, and finishing. Casting in metal includes basic lost wax methods, the foundry process, and finishing techniques.
Prerequisite: ART 231
View Book Information

ART 367  (3-0-6)  Subtractive Sculpture: An introduction to sculptural concepts developed through reductive carving techniques in the medium of wood, plaster, and stone as an expressive method of creating forms in space. Technical proficiency is based on understanding materials, use of specialized hand tools and equipment (power and pneumatic), safety practices, shaping, finishes, and presentation.
Prerequisite: ART 231
View Book Information

ART 368  (3-0-6)  Introduction to Woodworking: An introduction to wood and wood fabrication as a sculpture medium, this course includes an overview of general wood properties; medium specific wood working hand tools; safety and equipment in cutting; and joinery and finishing techniques.
Prerequisite: ART 231
View Book Information

ART 370  (3-0-6)  Sequential Art II: This class is meant to serve as an advanced introduction to the elements of visual storytelling. This class will focus on classical animation and current animation technologies. The course uses historical and international examples and explores the evolution of sequential, graphic, and comic art into contemporary forms and genres.
Prerequisite: ART 270
View Book Information

ART 371  (3-0-6)  Clay Modeling I: A course in clay modeling where students work from the figure to understand systems of sculpting from life.
Prerequisite: ART 121
View Book Information

ART 372  (3-0-6)  Clay Modeling II: A course that instructs students in the process of mold-making and the preparation for casting in metal, plaster, hydrocal, or concrete.
Prerequisite: ART 121
View Book Information

ART 380  (3-3-0)  Art Education: Methods and Materials: This course focuses on the creative abilities of the elementary school child. The course will explore the graphic abilities of the child, the philosophy of sequential learning, and various production techniques and processes appropriate for elementary school. In addition to creating and executing production lesson plans, students will learn to discuss exemplary works of art with the elementary student. Required course for Art Education Majors.
View Book Information

ART 381  (3-3-0)  Islamic Art: A survey of Islamic art from the period of the early caliphates (c. 700) to the heights of the Islamic empires (c. 1700), combined with close examinations of the issue of aniconism in the Islamic artistic tradition and of relationships between the Islamic and western traditions.
View Book Information

ART 391  (3-3-0)  Computer Graphics in Fine Arts: This course explores the development of computers as a tool to produce art. This class will allow students to experience the creation of their own art using computers, and to understand the concepts and rules of fine art production as they relate to this medium.
Prerequisite: ART 123
View Book Information

ART 400  (1-0-1)  Art Thesis: A course involving individual projects that investigate survival strategies, materials and techniques, theory of art, methods of criticism, and exhibition and presentation in the selected area. Intended for specialized studies in painting, ceramics, sculpture, graphics, and art history.
View Book Information

ART 410  (3-3-0)  Art Criticism: A course aimed at the evaluation of art concepts, the philosophy of aesthetics, and an analytical approach to discussing art forms.
Prerequisite: ART 321 And ART 322
View Book Information

ART 411  (3-2-1)  Art in Childhood Education: An investigation into the problems in children's art, the nature of art for children, art for creative expression, and the correlation of art with other subjects, with practical experience in the making and the teaching of simple art projects and activities appropriate to elementary school children.
View Book Information

ART 412  (3-0-6)  Advanced Painting: The study of painting techniques and composition, emphasizing a variety of painting media and the treatments of surface and subject matter to the development of styles.
Prerequisite: ART 121 And ART 212
View Book Information

ART 413  (3-3-0)  Direct Study in Advanced Painting III: A directed study course for students seeking contemporary water media painting problems. This course emphasizes the study of design principles, color structure, and fundamental methods of pictorial organization.
Prerequisite: ART 121 And ART 212
View Book Information

ART 414  (3-3-0)  Directed Study in Advanced Painting IV: A directed study course for students seeking a comprehensive analysis of painting media, experimentation of painting styles and self-expression.
Prerequisite: ART 121 And ART 212
View Book Information

ART 422  (3-2-1)  Art in the Intermediate Grades(4-9): A developmental study of creative expression facilitated through art in the intermediate grades, with students required to participate in activities involving a variety of art media such as drawing, painting, graphics, ceramics, etc., to develop a background for teaching art and to refine personal skills for artistic expression.
Prerequisite: ART 311 And ART 322
View Book Information

ART 430  (3-0-6)  Ceramics II: Further study and use of ceramic processes and techniques: hand forming, molding and wheel throwing, glaze utilization, and kiln operation.
Prerequisite: ART 230
View Book Information

ART 431  (3-0-6)  Ceramics III: A practical course focusing on advanced techniques in wheel throwing, clay formulation, glaze mixing, and glaze application, with students learning "how to," and gathering experience in loading and firing gas and electric kilns. Variable credit may be earned in this course.
Prerequisite: ART 430
View Book Information

ART 433  (3-3-0)  Directed Study in Advanced Printmaking III: This course is a directed study for students seeking extensive experimentation in printmaking techniques particular to traditional and contemporary printmaking processes.
Prerequisite: ART 353 And ART 354
View Book Information

ART 434  (3-3-0)  Directed Study in Advanced Printmaking IV: A direct study for students seeking to apply their knowledge of advanced printmaking techniques with an emphasis on development of personal style.
Prerequisite: ART 354 And ART 433
View Book Information

ART 440  (3-2-4)  Basic Photography: A course including activities such as camera operation, picture taking, darkroom techniques and procedures, and photo printing. Students must have access to a camera.
View Book Information

ART 441  (3-3-0)  Weaving: A study of cloth making, with emphasis on design and on the use of hand, floor, and table looms.
View Book Information

ART 450  (3-0-6)  Studio Problems: A course designed for independent work in the student's area of concentration. Advanced studio problems will be investigated. Variable credit may be earned.
View Book Information

ART 452  (3-0-6)  Ceramics IV: A studio course in advanced ceramics emphasizing formulations of clay bodies and glazes. Advanced wheel throwing, sculpturing, and combining materials. Instruction in kiln repair will be covered.
Prerequisite: ART 431
View Book Information

ART 453  (3-0-6)  Directed Study in Ceramics V: An advanced directed study in ceramics which explores and emphasizes innovative utilization of slab, coil, and wheel throwing methods. Electric and gas firing, decorative, personalized, advanced glazing, and formulation of techniques will be integral parts of this course.
Prerequisite: ART 431
View Book Information

ART 461  (3-0-6)  Advanced Photography: A course providing additional and advanced experiences in photographic production through the mastery of photo materials and equipment, with emphasis on visual literacy, the aesthetic manipulation of compositional elements, and successful photographic production.
Prerequisite: ART 440
View Book Information

ART 462  (3-3-0)  American Art: A course that covers the history of painting, graphics, sculpture, and architecture in American history.
View Book Information

ART 473  (3-0-6)  Advanced Metals: This course builds on the basic techniques of casting and fabricating metal sculptures. Application of advanced three-dimensional design principles, mixed media, finishing techniques and patinas are explore.
Prerequisite: ART 231
View Book Information

ART 481  (3-3-0)  Computer Design Multimedia: This course introduces students to interactive art, a form that allows the viewer or user to interact with visual communication. Students will be challenged to produce interactive art through the use of two types of software: PowerPoint and MacroMedia.
Prerequisite: ART 110 And ART 352
View Book Information

ASTR 111  (4-3-2)  Astronomy I: An introductory course in the science of astronomy, with emphasis on the investigation of nearby space , including the sun, moon, and planets, and with laboratory exercises illustrating the scientific methods and techniques used in gathering information about the planets, moons, and other objects in the Solar System.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 123
View Book Information

ASTR 112  (4-3-2)  Astronomy II: An introductory course in the science of astronomy, with emphasis on the investigation of distant space; the physical nature of stars, galaxies, black holes, and quasars; and on techniques used to gather information about these objects, with laboratory activities illustrating data gathering and interpretation techniques related to stars and galaxies. Students may enroll in ASTR 112 before completing ASTR 111.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 123; Prerequisite: ASTR 111 (unless permission is granted by the instructor to take ASTR 112 before ASTR 111)
View Book Information

BADM 200  (3-3-0)  Principles of Business: This course provides students with a basic study of business activity and how it relates to the economic society. The course is designed to help students develop a basic understanding of the areas of economics, management, marketing, accounting, and finance.
View Book Information

BADM 209  (3-3-0)  Legal Environments of Business: An overview of law and the legal environment of business, emphasizing those parts of law necessary to understand and appreciate the regulatory role of government and including such topics as constitutional law, contracts, torts, business ethics, business organizations, and government regulations.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And PHIL 110
View Book Information

BADM 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Global Literacy: An introduction to a survey of the theoretical and institutional intricacies of global literacy, with a focus on the special knowledge and skills critical to all engaged in the day-to-day interactions and administration of business enterprises and governmental organizations with overseas relationships.
View Book Information

BADM 214  (3-1-2)  Microcomputer Applications in Business: This course is designed to develop an understanding of the computer as a business and personal tool. Students will get a working knowledge of a variety of software programs such as spreadsheets, word processing, databases, and presentations. Projects that simulate business applications are provided.
View Book Information

BADM 215  (3-3-0)  Business Communications: A course that presents a scientific approach to the analysis and resolution of business problems through business letters, memoranda, and researched analytical reports. Other topics of study include nonverbal communication, business ethics, office automation, employment procedures, international business, and oral and listening skills.
Prerequisite: ENGL 120
View Book Information

BADM 216  (4-4-0)  Statistics for Business and Economics I: This course introduces statistical principles for business and economics applications. A study of multiple regression methods, analysis of variance, chi-square and elements of sampling, with training in statistical analysis with computer-based applications.
Prerequisite: MATH 140
View Book Information

BADM 220  (3-3-0)  Ethics and Civic Engagement: A study of the major theories of ethics and civic engagement. A core course developed to address the problems, questions, and dilemmas arising in business. This course offers an introduction into the classical and contemporary theories of morality, ethics, and civil engagement. It places emphasis on the development of moral reasoning skills that allow for meaningful analysis.
View Book Information

BADM 312  (3-3-0)  Statistics for Business and Economics II: A study of multiple regression methods, analysis of variance, chi-square tests, elements of sampling, quality control, and index numbers, with training in statistical analysis with computer-based implementation.
Prerequisite: BADM 216
View Book Information

BADM 352  (3-3-0)  Blacks in Contemporary Capitalistic Society: A study of racial issues considered within the context of American capitalism. This course emphasizes innovative techniques and procedures aimed at improving conditions for minorities and focuses on topics such as finance, business ownership, internal operations, salesmanship, banking, and managerial techniques.
View Book Information

BADM 412  (3-3-0)  Business Law: A study of the basic concepts of law applicable to the business profession and business endeavors, covering such topics as contracts, torts, commercial paper, agency, property, business organizations and constitutional protection.
Prerequisite: BADM 209
View Book Information

BADM 430  (3-3-0)  Business Internship: A course providing students with practical experience in approved business positions, including a seminar for formal evaluation of their work experience. Program must be arranged in advance and approved by the department chairperson; course is not open to students with credit from any similar program in the institution. This course is cross listed with ECON 450 and FINC 453.
View Book Information

BADM 490  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Business Administration: A course involving various subject matters as deemed by the business faculty to be appropriate to the needs of the student in meeting the objectives of the business degree program.
View Book Information

BICH 411  (3-3-0)  Biochemistry I: An introductory course that provides a theoretical basis for the major principles in biochemistry. The course includes an historical perspective of biochemistry, and a study of the four major biological macromolecules: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Three major areas of biochemistry will be emphasized: (1) acid/base equilibria; (2) structure and function of bio-molecules; and (3) biological information flow. In addition to lectures and discussions, problem sets will be assigned to equip students with an understanding of basic biochemical principles and to promote critical thinking and problem solving skills.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And (CHEM 220 Or CHEM 223)
View Book Information

BICH 412  (3-3-0)  Biochemistry II: A study of bioenergetics, biosynthesis of major biological macromolecules, and metabolic pathways in animals, plants, and microbes. Emphasis will also be placed on methods of purification and analysis of biological macromolecules and applications of basic biochemical principles to living systems. In addition to lectures and discussions, problem sets will be assigned to equip students with an understanding of basic biochemical principles and to promote critical thinking and problem solving skills. The course content will be correlated with the laboratory exercises in the co-requisite Biochemistry laboratory (BICH 421).
Prerequisite: BICH 411 Or BICH 421
View Book Information

BICH 421  (1-0-1)  Biochemistry Laboratory: The application of biochemical principles and techniques to the separation, purification, and analysis of biological substances, and to the investigation of metabolic activity.
Prerequisite: BICH 411 And BICH 412 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

BIOL 110  (4-3-2)  General Biology I: An introductory study of concepts relating to the origin of organisms: cell history, reproduction, structure and function; atomic and molecular structure of the cell; energy relations; structure, composition and systematics of major organic compounds; sexual and asexual reproduction; and genetics and evolution. Includes two (2) hours of lab consisting of qualitative experiments illustrating biological principles and basic laboratory techniques.
View Book Information

BIOL 130  (4-3-2)  General Biology II: A study of ecology and of systems regulating and supporting the metabolism of organisms. Includes two (2) hours of lab consisting of qualitative experiments in ecology, classification, and the physiology of organisms.
Prerequisite: BIOL 110
View Book Information

BIOL 150  (4-3-2)  Principles of Biology I: The study of the major principles relating to the nature of organisms, with emphasis on molecular, cellular, genetic, and evolutionary concepts, and with two (2) hours of lab consisting of experiments on the analysis of the chemistry of cellular and related materials.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 or higher level of MATH
View Book Information

BIOL 160  (4-3-2)  Principles of Biology II: The study of the major principles relating to the nature of organisms, with emphasis on evolution, introducing the diversity and complexity of life at the macro-scale (survey of kingdoms and phyla). The course will include two (2) hours of lab consisting of observations and dissections of both plant and animal species and stressing the relationship between form and function.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150
View Book Information

BIOL 200  (4-3-2)  Cellular Biology: An examination of cell structure in relation to function, including studies of biochemistry, cytogenetics, physiology, reproduction, and the evolution of animal, plant, and bacterial cells.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

BIOL 225  (3-3-0)  Scientific Communication: A course designed to introduce students to the principles of oral and written communication. Students will learn how to read, critique, and write a scientific paper; how to conduct literature searches; and how to prepare and present an oral scientific talk. In addition, the ethical issues related to scientific communications and scientific integrity will be discussed.
View Book Information

BIOL 255  (4-3-2)  Principles of Microbiology: A course designed to introduce the structure, diversity, physiology, metabolism, and genetics of microorganisms. The role of microorganisms in disease and human health will be explored. Fundamental concepts of immunology, epidemiology, microbial pharmacology, and antibiotic resistance will also be covered. The course includes two (2) hours of lab consisting of applications of essential microbiological laboratory methods. An understanding of experimental design, scientific writing skills, and aseptic technique will also be assessed in lab. This course is designed for nursing and pre-nursing majors only. No other major at Fayetteville State University is permitted to use BIOL 255 to fulfill Natural Sciences requirements. Only nursing and pre-nursing majors are permitted to use BIOL 255 to fulfill support course requirements. This course does not meet the Microbiology course requirement for Biology, Biology Education, Biotechnology, Forensic Sciences, or pre-professional degree programs.
View Book Information

BIOL 320  (1-0-2)  Biology Seminar: A course involving discussions of current topics in modern biology. Student presentations of papers on special issues in biology should be expected.
View Book Information

BIOL 325  (3-2-2)  Molecular Biology: An in depth study of the structure, function, and biochemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Isolation, purification and structural modification of DNA and protein in laboratory exercises will be utilized to provide an understanding of the various DNA/protein methodologies and their applicability to forensic science. This course is cross listed with FORS 325.
View Book Information

BIOL 330  (4-3-2)  Microbiology and Immunology: An introduction to the structure, physiology, ecology, and immunological host relationships of prokaryotes and other microorganisms, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of applications of microbiological and immunological techniques.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

BIOL 350  (3-2-2)  Ecology/Evolution: A study of mechanisms governing the process of organic evolution, evolutionary relationships among living and extinct organisms, and the interactions between organisms and their environment, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of an observational/experimental study of the concepts of evolution and ecology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And ZOOL 310
View Book Information

BIOL 430  (3-3-0)  Special Problems: A course involving guided scientific research, field studies, or other special projects.
View Book Information

BIOL 431  (3-2-2)  Population Genetics: A study of genetic and ecological forces that influence the structure of populations with two (2) hours of laboratory exercises and experimental studies. Students will evaluate the effects of random genetic drifts, mutations, natural selection, inbreeding, assortative mating, molecular evolution and quantitative/ecological genetics on populations. This course is cross listed with FORS 431
View Book Information

BIOL 490  (4-3-2)  Radiation Biology: An introductory course for science majors on the nature and use of radioisotopes, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of basic experiments with radioisotopes using the latest instrumentation.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And MATH 241 And CHEM 211 And CHEM 212
View Book Information

BOTN 210  (4-3-2)  General Botany: An introduction to the morphology, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, taxonomy, and ecology of higher plants, fungi, and algae, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of observation interpretation of the morphology and structure relating to the function, identification, and adaptation of higher plants, fungi, and algae.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
View Book Information

BTCH 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Biotechnology: An introduction to the fundamentals of biotechnology and career options emphasizing the types of biotechnology workplaces and their unique requirements. The course includes a study of the use of mathematics, principles of instrumentation used, and analysis of measurements, solutions, centrifugation, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and electrophoresis. The importance of laboratory safety and precision will also be stressed.
View Book Information

BTCH 220  (4-1-3)  Biotechniques I (formerly BTCH 420): A laboratory course in basic biotechnology theory, skills, and applications. Includes spectrophotometry, gel filtration chromatography, gel electrophoresis, DNA isolation, Restriction enzyme digestion, genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting, Southern and Western blot analysis.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

BTCH 230  (4-1-3)  Biotechniques II (formerly BTCH 430): A laboratory course teaching biotechnology theory, skills, and applications. Includes DNA sequencing, PCR, immunology, cell culture, separation technology, principles of fermentation technology, basic aptitudes for the biotechnology industry.
Prerequisite: BTCH 220 (formerly BTCH 420)
View Book Information

BTCH 310  (3-3-0)  Immunology: Examines the components of the immune systems, immune responses, immune effectors, and immune diseases. Methods used in experimental studies of immunology are also introduced.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

BTCH 320  (3-3-0)  NanoBiotechnology: This introductory course is designed to explore applications of nanotechnology to biotechnology. Nanotechnology deals with materials and devices that are or have structures of a size between 1 to 100 nm. Students will be introduced with the nano-based labeling technologies, fabrication strategies, nanofoods and nanotoxicology. Design and working of the nanodevices will also be discussed for applications in therpeutics, agriculture, food and diagnostic areas. A thorough understanding of DNA proteins, carbohydrates and lipid molecules is expected of the students.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
View Book Information

BTCH 340  (4-3-2)  Toxicology: Introduces the principles of toxicology. This course covers general concepts underlying the absorption, distribution, metabolism, action, and excretion of xenobiotics and the consequences to biological systems following exposure of toxicants, particularly the relevance to human health.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

BTCH 350  (3-3-0)  Advanced Biomolecular Science: A seminar course which discusses pioneering and cutting edge research in molecular biology, cell biology, and developmental biology. Students will also be introduced to basic tools of biomolecular science.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142
View Book Information

BTCH 360  (3-2-2)  Molecular Genetics: A study of the molecular definition of genes, gene sets, and gene expressions, with applications of gene functions to health, disease, and molecular evolution. Methods of gene analysis are studied with special reference to the human genome project and current genomic research.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or ZOOL 310 Or consent of the instructor
View Book Information

BTCH 410  (3-3-0)  Biotechology Seminar: Discusses current topics and current research in biotechnology. Also includes review of the requirements and ethics of the biotechnology workplace and laboratory. Presentations will be required.
View Book Information

BTCH 425  (3-3-0)  Bioinformatics: Introduces bioinformatics using computational methods to analyze and help interpret the content of large volumes of biological data generated by genome sequencing, DNA micro-arrays, proteomics, metabolites and metabolic fluxes. The computational methods used in this course include analysis of sequences, gene clustering, and pattern recognition/discovery in large scale expression data. Application of bioinformatics to drug design, and biotechnology will be discussed.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And (CHEM 220 Or CHEM 223)
View Book Information

BTCH 435  (4-3-2)  Plant Biotechnology: This course provides an introduction to the theory, application, and techniques that are involved in plant cells and tissues and in the micro-propagation process. The course will also focus on the use of techniques in molecular biology in the study, development, and improvement of various plant species.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or BTCH 230
View Book Information

BTCH 440  (4-1-5)  Tissue Culture and Hybridoma: A laboratory course which teaches techniques for the establishment, assay, and maintenance of a variety of types of cells, tissue and hybridoma cultures.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or BTCH 430
View Book Information

BTCH 450  (3-3-0)  Problems in Biotechnology: A course designed to give students interactive exposure to and experience in biotechnology environments. Credit may be earned (with instructor approval) through one or more of the following: internships or cooperative experiences in biotechnology related sites, research project studying a biotechnology problem/question, research paper on a controversial biotechnology issue or procedure, or approved online or on-site course from on-site bio-works/biotechnology workplace programs. The course will also include a seminar sequence on workplace issues and ethics supported by on-site interview.
View Book Information

BTCH 460  (4-2-2)  Introduction to Genomic Science: This course offers an introduction to the emerging field of genomics. The term "genome" describes the structure and content of the genetic make-up of an organism. Genomic science covers the study of the structure, organization, and function of genomes. Students will learn about the human genome project and related genome projects; sequence databases and analysis tools; functional genomics; and systems biology. Class lectures will be supplemented with hands-on laboratory and computer exercises.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 Or BTCH 360 Or BIOL 325 or the consent of the instructor
View Book Information

BTCH 490  (4-0-8)  Research in Biotechnology: This course gives biotechnology students the opportunity to develop the skills needed to conduct research with minimum supervision. Students learn how to design an experiment, collect scientific information, prepare an outline of procedures, initiate the project, conduct the experiments specified, write a comprehensive scientific report, and make a presentation on the findings of the project. Biotechnology students in their Junior or Senior year will be eligible to enroll in this course. Students will work with a mentor willing to provide guidance and oversee the research project.
View Book Information

CHEM 101  (4-3-2)  Introduction to Chemical Principles: A one semester course directed at non-chemistry majors that provides an introduction to general chemistry, and the fundamentals of biological chemistry. The course with its laboratory activities introduces states of matter, atoms and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, mole concept, gas laws, pH and acid-base chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 129
View Book Information

CHEM 102  (4-3-2)  Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry: A one semester course directed at non-chemistry majors that provides an introduction to organic chemistry and principles of biochemistry. This course with its laboratory activities, introduces hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, amino acids, nucleic acids, protein, fat, carbohydrate, and discusses the chemistry involved in metabolic pathways and energy production.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101
View Book Information

CHEM 120  (3-3-0)  The Atom and Bonding: A non-mathematical study of atomic structure, elementary nuclear theory, the periodic table, bonding, valence, hybridization, and molecular and crystal structure. Corequisite: MATH 123.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

CHEM 130  (4-3-3)  Stoichiometry: The study of stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, and the balancing of chemical equations, with laboratory activities investigating mole-mass relationships, gas laws, and measurement of thermochemical phenomena.
Prerequisite: CHEM 120 And MATH 123
View Book Information

CHEM 141  (3-3-0)  General Chemistry I Lecture: The first course of a two semester sequence in introductory chemistry that studies measurement and uncertainty, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry, types of reactions, solution concentrations, gas laws, thermochemistry, electronic configuration, periodic properties of the elements, and chemical bonding (including molecular geometries).
Prerequisite: MATH 129
View Book Information

CHEM 142  (1-0-3)  General Chemistry I Laboratory: This laboratory course that accompanies CHEM 141 introduces laboratory techniques, physical properties, stoichiometry, gas laws, and types of chemical reactions. Safe laboratory techniques and the writing of quality laboratory reports will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: MATH 129.
View Book Information

CHEM 161  (3-3-0)  General Chemistry II Lecture: The second part of a two semester (one year) course in college level chemistry. The course investigates kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142
View Book Information

CHEM 162  (1-0-3)  General Chemistry II Laboratory: This continuation of the General Chemistry I Laboratory (CHEM 142) investigates solution properties, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and qualitative and elementary quantitative analysis.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142
View Book Information

CHEM 205  (4-4-0)  Chemical Process Principles: An introduction to material and energy balance principles for chemical systems. Topics include fluid density, flow rate, chemical composition variables, pressure, and temperature. Students will be able to approach problems from a chemical engineering standpoint, including problems involving recycle, bypass, and reactive processes.
View Book Information

CHEM 211  (3-3-0)  Analytical Chemistry Lecture: A one semester course that investigates the principles of quantitative analytical chemistry and how these principles are applied in chemistry and related disciplines. Lecture and laboratory concentrate on tools, experimental error, statistics, quality assurance, calibration methods, systematic treatment of equilibrium, acid-base titration, EDTA titration, redox titration, gravimetric analysis, introduction to electroanalytical and spectrometric methods, concepts of analytical separation and application of Excel in analytical chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

CHEM 212  (2-0-6)  Analytical Chemistry Lab: A one-semester analytical chemistry laboratory course that investigates the principles of quantitative analytical chemistry and how the principles and techniques of classical methods (e.g., gravimetric, titrimetric, and redox) of analysis and some of the most common instrumental methods (e.g., spectrometric and separation techniques) are applied in chemistry and related disciplines. Laboratory experimentations will involve the use of these analytical techniques in the determination of substances in a variety of sample matrices.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162.
View Book Information

CHEM 220  (4-3-3)  Principle of Organic Chemistry: A one-semester course in which the chemistry of the hydrocarbons (including aromatics) and monofunctional alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids (and their derivatives), and amines is surveyed. The course will conclude with an introduction to the chemistry of polyfunctional biomolecules. The laboratory will consist of the techniques used in the purification, isolation, and identification by physical properties of organic compounds and conclude with the utilization of these techniques in the preparation of organic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

CHEM 223  (3-3-0)  Organic Chemistry I Lecture: A study of the nomenclature, synthesis, reactions and reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopy of hydrocarbons alkylhalides and alcohols, with laboratory exercises introducing techniques of isolation, purification, characterization, and synthetic methods in organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

CHEM 224  (1-0-3)  Organic Chemistry I Lab: A study of laboratory exercises introducing techniques in isolation, purification, characterization, and synthetic methods in organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

CHEM 225  (4-4-0)  Organic Chemistry II Lecture: A course investigating the nomenclature, synthesis, reactions and reaction mechanisms, and methods for analysis of functionally substituted organic compounds, with laboratory activities extending the topics started in CHEM223 and emphasizing syntheses and technical writing.
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
View Book Information

CHEM 226  (1-0-3)  Organic Chemistry II Lab: A course investigating the nomenclature, synthesis, reactions and reaction mechanism, and methods for analysis of functionally substituted organic compounds with laboratory activities extending the topics started in CHEM 223 and emphasizing syntheses and technical writing.
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
View Book Information

CHEM 227  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Chemical Engineering Analysis: Introduction of mathematical and computational tools for analyzing chemical engineering problems. Sequential modular and equation-based simulation of steady-state chemical processes using advanced spreadsheet methods and multivariate root-finding algorithms. Material and energy balances on transient processes and their solution using analytical and numerical methods. Introduction to microscopic material and energy balances using the "shell balance" approach to develop the governing differential equations. Solutions to steady-state boundary value problems in heat conduction and Fickian diffusion.
Prerequisite: MATH 242
View Book Information

CHEM 310  (4-2-4)  Instrumental Analysis: Principles of operation and application of modern chemical instrumentation used in analytical chemistry. Topics include statistics, spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electroanalytical, and separation science. Reinforcement of these techniques by practical experience, aspects of sample preparation, standardization, data acquisition and interpretation.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212
View Book Information

CHEM 313  (3-3-0)  Physical Chemistry I: The first course in a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry that investigates the properties of real gases, the three laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria for single and binary systems, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, the transport properties of matter, the kinetic theory, and the application and derivation of integrated rate laws.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 121 And PHYS 122 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

CHEM 314  (3-3-0)  Physical Chemistry II: The second course in a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry, that provides an introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications to atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy and investigates statistical mechanics as a bridge between microscopic and macroscopic worlds. Students will also be exposed to molecular reaction dynamics, including collision theory and activated-complex theory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 313
View Book Information

CHEM 321  (3-3-0)  Thermodynamics and Equilibrium: A calculus-based study of the three laws of thermodynamics with derivation of equilibrium constants from chemical potential, Raoult’s Law, the phase rule, and equilibrium electrochemistry including the Debye-Hueckle theory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 121 And PHYS 122 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

CHEM 322  (3-3-0)  Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy: A course investigating the wave-particle dilemma as resolved by the Bohr atom, Dirac wave mechanics, and Eigen values of the Schroedinger equation, with applications to atomic and molecular vibrational, rotational, and electronic spectra.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 122
View Book Information

CHEM 324  (3-3-0)  Kinetics: A study of change, including the transport properties of gases and liquids and electrical conduction. Starting with the kinetic theory of gases, the absolute rate theory and the collision theory are derived. Other topics include rates; mechanisms including complex mechanisms (consecutive, chain, branching, autocatalytic, and polymerizing); and the half-life of chemical reactions. Students will also be exposed to the steady-state approximation, and the study of the Arrhenius theory for calculation of activation parameters.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 122
View Book Information

CHEM 325  (3-0-6)  Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Laboratory investigations involving the determination of enthalpies, equilibrium constants, molecular mass, electromotive force, entropy, reaction rates and activation parameters, solution phenomena, conductance, and the gathering and quantitative interpretation of spectra.
Prerequisite: CHEM 313
View Book Information

CHEM 330  (3-3-0)  Principles of Inorganic Chemistry: A focus on trends of inorganic reactions, structure, and properties of the elements and their compounds in relation to their position in the periodic table. Students will be able to rationalize and interpret most inorganic properties using qualitative models that are based on quantum mechanics, such as the properties of atomic orbitals and their use to form molecular orbitals. Modern organometallic compounds will be introduced, and the environmental impact of inorganic chemistry will be discussed. This course will consist of lecture and discussion sessions.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

CHEM 390  (1-0-3)  Research I: A detailed examination of topics and studies in chemistry in preparation for beginning a formal research project to be conducted in CHEM 491 and CHEM 492, culminating in a written and oral report.
View Book Information

CHEM 400  (3-2-2)  Computational Chemistry: This class introduces students to different computational methods and models to study electronic structure of molecules and materials. The topics that will be covered include Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, coupled cluster and semi-empirical methods such as Huckel and expended Huckel calculations. The laboratory activities include computational experiments to illustrate the applicability of computational methods to chemistry, bio-sciences, and materials chemistry. These experiments will be carried out on Linux and UNIX-based workstations.
Prerequisite: CHEM 225 And CHEM 226 And CHEM 314
View Book Information

CHEM 410  (1-0-3)  Seminar in Chemical Literature: A detailed examination of the chemical literature on a relatively narrow topic for presentation of written and oral reports.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
View Book Information

CHEM 421  (3-3-0)  Inorganic Chemistry: An advanced study of descriptive and synthetic inorganic chemistry, structure, and bonding.
Prerequisite: CHEM 225 And CHEM 226
View Book Information

CHEM 422  (4-3-2)  Bioanalytical Chemistry: A study of basic concepts of analytical chemistry applied to biologically oriented problems. Principles underlying instrumentation, automation, and laboratory computers used in solving bioanalysis problems are also examined. Methods include spectroscopy immunoassays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and mass spectroscopy. Further, biosensors, bioassays, DNA, and protein sequencing will be discussed.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
View Book Information

CHEM 423  (3-3-0)  Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: A comprehensive introduction to the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Topics cover properties of nanomaterials, synthesis of nanomaterials, characterization of nanomaterials, nanobiotechnology/nanomedicine and nanoelectronics.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And PHYS 122
View Book Information

CHEM 424  (3-3-0)  Separation Science: The course introduces the modern physical and chemical techniques used for analytical separations. The primary theme of chromatography, includes gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and supercritical fluid chromatography. Other important analytical separation techniques to be discussed include capillary electrophoresis, field-flow fractionation, size exclusion chromatography, and chromatographic measurements of physicochemical, biochemical, and geochemical processes.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212
View Book Information

CHEM 430  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Chemistry: An advanced, structured investigation in one of the specialty areas of chemistry.
View Book Information

CHEM 431  (3-1-4)  Qualitative Organic Analysis: An advanced introduction to the principles of classification and identification of organic compounds by traditional and modern analytic techniques.
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
View Book Information

CHEM 490  (4-1-6)  Chemistry Research and Ethics: A capstone research course for seniors that offers a comprehensive examination of the Chemistry curriculum. The course provides detailed training in ethics education, literature reading and review, research planning, hands-on research practicing, lab reports, and oral/ written presentations. Students must adopt a research area and work with a research advisor.
Prerequisite: CHEM 310 Or instructor approval
View Book Information

CHEM 491  (2-0-6)  Research II: Active, original research under one or more of the chemistry faculty.
Prerequisite: CHEM 390
View Book Information

CHEM 492  (4-0-12)  Research II and Thesis: A continuation of research culminating in a written thesis and an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: CHEM 491
View Book Information

CHIN 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary Chinese I: This course introduces the basics of Chinese language - the pinyin, characters and grammar. Students are expected to learn about 150 single characters and 200 compound words of modern standard Chinese. The course emphasizes speaking and reading as well as writing.
View Book Information

CHIN 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary Chinese II: The course is designed to build up basic vocabulary for conversation, reading and writing, and improve students' comprehension in speaking, listening, reading and writing Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 110
View Book Information

CHIN 210  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Chinese I: The course is designed to enhance students' abilities in speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. Students will not only learn complicated conversations but also use vocabularies and sentence structures to discuss social and political issues. They will also learn to write narratives and short essays.
Prerequisite: CHIN 120
View Book Information

CHIN 220  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Chinese II: This course is designed to continue to enhance students' abilities in speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. Students will not only learn complicated conversations but also use vocabularies and sentence structures to discuss social and political issues. They will also learn to write narratives and short essays.
Prerequisite: CHIN 210
View Book Information

CHIN 310  (3-3-0)  Advanced Chinese I: This course is designed to further improve the students' reading and writing abilities as well as spoken ability in Chinese. Students taking the course will be exposed to essays, prose, movies, short novels, and poems in their original forms either in classical Chinese or modern Chinese. They will discuss these readings in class and then write their argumentation papers in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 220
View Book Information

CHIN 330  (3-3-0)  Classical Chinese Literature: This survey course is examines the long tradition of Chinese literature, from its genesis to the mid-19th century before it was transformed under the influence from the West. We will look into the diversity and richness of this tradition while tracing its dramatic historical changes in a time period of nearly three thousand years. In addition to studying prose and poetry, we will also consider historical content as well as social and philosophical writings. Students are expected not just to learn the long and rich tradition but, more importantly, to reconstruct it through the texts they are to read and papers they are to write. All course materials are in English.
View Book Information

CHIN 331  (3-3-0)  Modern Chinese Language: In this survey course, students will read key literary texts by important writers in modern Chinese writers, including Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Ding Ling (Ting Ling), Shen Congwen (Shen Tsung-wen), Zhang, Ailing (Eilen Chang), and Wang Anyi. The course explores issues of nationalism, modernity and globalization as represented in Chinese Literature. By discussing these issues in literary contexts, students will gain a better understanding of cultural production and social change in modern Chinese history. All the texts are in English.
View Book Information

CHIN 332  (3-3-0)  Cinema and Contemporary China: This course examines the technical, aesthetic, economical and historical interactions between contemporary Chinese cinema and contemporary Chinese society. Students will see the representative film works by contemporary Chinese directors from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and analyze the various cinematic styles in relation to the social and historical changes in which the films were made. They will also discuss such issues as modernity, nationalism, and globalization that the Chinese people have dealt with in contemporary China. For students learning the Chinese language, this course will also offer many authentic linguistic materials. All texts are in English and/or with English
View Book Information

COMM 201  (1-0-3)  Communication Activities: Practical supervised training through participation in departmental performance laboratories. Up to three hours of credit in COMM 201 can be applied to the 18 hour credit concentration in Mass Communication. Additional COMM 201 credit will be accepted as free electives.
View Book Information

COMM 205  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Communication: The study of communication in expediting learning, affecting social interaction and effective change, and an exploration of the components of interpersonal, small group, public and organizational communication.
View Book Information

COMM 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Mass Communications: A survey of the role of mass media in modern society. The process, functions, responsibility and effects of various forms of mass communication will be analyzed.
View Book Information

COMM 211  (3-3-0)  Phonetics: A study of the production and transcription of phonetic symbols used in the International Phonetic Alphabet, with attention to general American speech and Career speech.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
View Book Information

COMM 212  (3-3-0)  Voice and Diction: A study of proper breathing for good voice production, pause, stress, intonation, and control of resonance. Emphasis is placed on improving phonation, enunciation, and articulation.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
View Book Information

COMM 215  (3-3-0)  Fundamentals of Journalism: This course presents the history and development of American journalism from colonial times to the present while focusing on its relationship to technical, political, social, and technological changes in America. Specific attention will be paid to events resulting in constraints to the media, attitudes of government toward the media, changes influenced by journalists and trends in journalism.
View Book Information

COMM 220  (3-3-0)  Film & Video Appreciation: Examination of basic film and video media techniques and basic methods of analysis. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating film and video media as major forms of communication.
View Book Information

COMM 230  (3-3-0)  News Reporting and Writing I: This course is designed to help students develop their niche for news reporting and writing. Students will be exposed to news gathering practices, write and report the news, and learn in unique styles of print as well as on-line journalism. It will explore the constant writing of news stories and emphasizes policy, principles, and concepts basic to the field of journalism.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
View Book Information

COMM 235  (3-3-0)  Public Relations/Advertising: This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of public relations and advertising. Student will study the history and trends of the public relations and advertising industry focusing on principles, tools, techniques, practices, and ethics. Accepted standards used in public relations and advertising will be presented.
View Book Information

COMM 240  (3-3-0)  News Editing: This course will focus on advanced and specialized public life news reporting for the print media. Employing sophisticated methods, including public records searches, computer-assisted reporting, and archival research, students will develop and polish their reporting and gain a greater understanding of how news is constructed in relation to institutions and people in public life. Students will learn the basis for crafting news stories that convey meaning as well as fact, and insight to the readers.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
View Book Information

COMM 260  (3-3-0)  Interpersonal Communication: A study of the process of communication, including functions, models, and theories, with an emphasis on self-disclosure, empathic listening, relational communication, and conflict management.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
View Book Information

COMM 300  (3-3-0)  Magazine and Feature Writing: This course works within journalistic standards to focus on the skills needed to write topical, in-depth, human interest stories. Students learn to gather materials through interviews, research, and observation while cultivating their own writer's "voice" for the creation of comprehensive articles for publication in newspapers, magazines, Internet sites, and other media. Students will examine the discursive implications of magazine and feature writing, newspaper, radio, computer, polling, and advertising technologies. Students will assume a concrete understanding of editorial, sidebars, graphs, charts, and other supporting elements that enrich a story.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
View Book Information

COMM 310  (3-3-0)  News Reporting and Writing II: This course further develops research, organization, and composition skills for the production of professional-quality articles for publication in newspapers, magazines, Internet sites, and other media. The course will introduce students to the field of investigative journalism, including career prospects, ethical concerns, basic interviewing techniques, finding and following documented sources, and writing stories for maximum interest and impact. Students will practice organizing materials and writing with clarity and precision.
Prerequisite: COMM 230
View Book Information

COMM 311  (3-3-0)  Public Speaking: A study of the principles of effective public communication, focusing on speech preparation and design, audience analysis, and speech presentation in a variety of public situations.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
View Book Information

COMM 315  (3-3-0)  Computer Mediated Communication: A class designed to initiate students to the field of study known as computer-mediated communication (CMC). Computers, their networks, and the content on them have significantly influenced our political, religious, commercial, personal, and professional lives. Students will explore both qualitative and quantitative scholarship that focuses upon the implications of online media in these settings.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
View Book Information

COMM 320  (3-3-0)  Audio Production I: An introduction to the planning and production of audio in mass media, including practical studies of the uses of sound and the planning, scripting, rehearsing, and directing process of audio production.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 321  (3-3-0)  Group Discussion: Training and practice in the effective exchange of opinions on selected topics, with emphasis on studying group interactions during the process of discussion and observing the effects of parliamentary procedures on the conduct of groups in discussion.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
View Book Information

COMM 330  (3-3-0)  Writing For Mass Media: A survey of the various forms of written expression in mass media.
Prerequisite: COMM 210 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

COMM 332  (3-3-0)  Problems in Media Communication: This course will examine contemporary problems of mediated communication, including gatekeeping, propaganda, agenda setting, cultural transmission, regulation and censorship, regulation and censorship, and commercialization. Students will examine the discursive implications of newspaper, radio, television, film, computer, polling, and advertising technologies. Students will assume a rhetorical perspective to evaluate the role of these technologies in shaping public opinion and our perceptions of reality.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 340  (3-3-0)  Community Journalism: This course will examine community journalism as a defined niche within mainstream journalism. It is designed to give students greater insight into the tools and skills needed to work at the community level. Course explores different forms of community journalism from small-town newspapers to new ideas of community, including virtual communities. This course will help students use traditional and new media tools to find sources and to report, gather, and disseminate stories of interest to specific audiences. This course will also introduce students to citizen journalism and how to interact with and leverage citizen journalists.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
View Book Information

COMM 341  (3-3-0)  Health Communication: This course provides an overview of the various areas of study within the health communication field. The class explores multiple communication issues relevant to health, including language, information processing, the social construction of health and illness, doctor-patient communication, and the relationship between professionals, patients, friends, families, and cultural institutions. In addition, the class has a strong practical aspect; emphasis is placed on assignments that require students to engage in projects involving the application of theoretical knowledge acquired during lectures and individual readings.
View Book Information

COMM 350  (3-3-0)  Telecommunications Management: A course exploring management functions in a telecommunications environment. Economic support patterns, programming, promotion, advertising, determination of community needs and facility operations will be covered.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 360  (3-3-0)  Video Production I: An introduction to the elements of television production, including cameras, audio, staging, lighting, graphics, recording, and special effects.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 365  (3-3-0)  Speechwriting: A comprehensive look at the history of and current trends in speechwriting in America with an emphasis on persuasion and the strategic employment of language. Students will learn and practice the art of effective speechmaking by studying both effective and inadequate models of oratory. Students will learn how to prepare various types of speeches for a variety of audiences and rhetorical situations, including how to manage new technologies in those situations.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

COMM 370  (3-3-0)  Communication Practicum: A practical study of an area of communications, with reading assignments supplementing course activities. Repeatable one time for Mass Communication Concentration elective credit.
View Book Information

COMM 375  (3-3-0)  Organizational Communication: Organizational Communication provides the student with a background in theory and research about communication within organizations. The course focuses on interpersonal communication within organizations, small group communication within organizations, leadership and management within organizations and communication conflict within organizations.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 380  (3-3-0)  Non-Broadcast Telecommunications Systems: An introduction to the use of telecommunications media in corporate, industrial, medical, educational, military, governmental and public service institutions.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 385  (3-3-0)  International Communication: This course surveys the communication systems of the world focusing on major newspaper networks, broadcasting and film consortia, and the Internet. Theories of international communication are used to compare and contrast the communication systems of different nations.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 390  (3-3-0)  Cable Communications: An examination of the cable television industry including technical aspects, franchising, programming, and government regulation.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 395  (3-3-0)  Communication Theory: Theoretical paradigms within the communication discipline are surveyed with attention given to the assumptions that undergird theoretical traditions and the types of research questions that can be studied from within different theoretical perspectives. Several traditional theoretical perspectives are presented, including Aristotelian analysis, symbolic interactionism, pragmatism, and technological determinism, along with modern theoretical approaches such as constructivism, discourse theory, and critical cultural approaches.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
View Book Information

COMM 400  (3-3-0)  Advanced News Reporting and Writing: This course covers the process of gathering, writing, editing, and presenting the news on radio and television. Subject areas embrace the changing industry, finding the news, broadcast news writing mechanics, broadcast news writing style, the interview, writing broadcast copy, color, radio news, writing for the television newscast, delivering the news, broadcast news reporting, covering assignments, reporting planned events, reporting live, ethical issues, producing, hardware.
Prerequisite: COMM 230 And COMM 240
View Book Information

COMM 401  (3-3-0)  Argumentation and Debate: A study of the process of argumentation, with special attention to the structure of argument, reasoning, and the nature of evidence.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
View Book Information

COMM 410  (3-3-0)  Communication Internship: A course providing students with opportunities for combining theory and practice by their arranging, outlining, and engaging in a program of practical experiences under the joint supervision of a communications organization or agency, and the course instructor. This course is repeatable for up to six hours of course credit.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing
View Book Information

COMM 425  (3-3-0)  Rhetorical Theory and Criticism: This course focuses on basic rhetorical theory and a variety of rhetorical criticism methodologies. Students will study the importance of rhetoric as the field of study that investigates all forms of public persuasion. Students will learn about rhetoric as one of the oldest public professions and academic fields of study, the evolution of thought regarding rhetoric in society, how to conduct research in the field of communication using a rhetorical approach to communication, and how to apply these basic concepts in their own communication activities.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200 And COMM 205
View Book Information

COMM 430  (3-3-0)  News and Public Affairs: A study of the principles, techniques, and forms of journalism, with students gaining experience in preparing, editing, and delivering news and public affairs materials for a variety of media.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
View Book Information

COMM 440  (3-3-0)  Audio Production II: An advanced course in audio production techniques including remote setups, studio operations, and multi-track recording.
Prerequisite: COMM 320
View Book Information

COMM 450  (3-3-0)  Telecommunications Law: Principles and case studies in communications law including constitutional guarantees, libel, privacy, contempt, privilege, copyright, and governmental regulatory agencies.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 460  (3-3-0)  Video Production II: An advanced course in video production techniques providing a laboratory experience in production and direction of video projects.
Prerequisite: COMM 360
View Book Information

COMM 470  (3-3-0)  Intercultural Communication: The course provides basic principles and rules for understanding intercultural communication and provides instruction on how to apply the principles when communicating in intercultural situations. The course also provides a wide range of examples and cases of communication practices in different cultures to increase the student's knowledge base about communication diversity in the world.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 480  (3-3-0)  Communication, Technology, and Society: This reading and discussion course is designed to examine the connections among communication, technological development, and society. Students will explore how persuasive communication has affected our perception and employment of technology in society and how those technologies have, in turn, affected public discourse and interaction. Students will adopt a rhetorical perspective in evaluating and understanding classical primary and secondary readings in technological and scientific discourse.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
View Book Information

COMM 490  (3-3-0)  Communication Research: The development of mass communication theory is studied with attention given to the emergence of major paradigms of theory including the development of process and effective perspectives, the development of social learning perspectives, the development of uses and gratifications perspectives, and the development of critical and cultural perspectives.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210 And Senior Standing
View Book Information

COOP 431  (3-3-0)  Cooperative Education I: A program integrating the classroom curriculum with planned periods of in-service professional work related to the student's declared major. Cooperative Education is offered on a competitive basis through the Student Academic Services Center in conjunction with the Academic Advisors, Department Chairpersons and Academic Deans. The students ordinarily begin their first in-service experience at the end of the sophomore year.
View Book Information

COOP 432  (3-3-0)  Cooperative Education II: A continuation of the cooperative work experience program.
Prerequisite: COOP 431 Or COOP 433
View Book Information

COOP 433  (6-6-0)  Cooperative Education III: A program integrating the classroom curriculum with planned periods of full-time in-service professional work related to the student's declared major. Cooperative Education is offered on a competitive basis through the Office of Career Services & Placement in conjunction with the Academic Advisors, Department Chairpersons and Academic Deans. The students ordinarily begin their first in-service experience at the end of the sophomore year.
View Book Information

COOP 434  (6-6-0)  Cooperative Education IV: A continuation of the cooperative work experience program.
Prerequisite: COOP 433
View Book Information

COOP 435  (6-6-0)  Cooperative Education V: A continuation of the cooperative work experience program.
Prerequisite: COOP 434
View Book Information

CRJC 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to the Criminal Justice System: A survey course designed to familiarize students with the functions, structure, and organization of the agencies that are responsible for the administration of justice. Specifically, the course introduces students to the institutions and processes of law making and enforcement, the judicial system, corrections and the juvenile justice system.
View Book Information

CRJC 201  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Law Enforcement: A study of the history and philosophy of local, state, and federal law enforcement entities in the U.S. with emphasis on the interdependence of law enforcement and other components of the criminal justice system. The course also examines the roles of the police in the administration of justice and the critical issues that affect law enforcement in contemporary society.
View Book Information

CRJC 202  (3-3-0)  Legal Aspects of Criminal Justice: A study of procedural aspects of the legal process and administration of justice including constitutional rights, participants in court processes, rules of evidence and the exclusionary rule, and expert testimony.
View Book Information

CRJC 203  (3-3-0)  Criminal Justice Ethics: A critical examination of the diverse ethical issues encountered in the American criminal justice system with a focus on comparing and contrasting the principles of moral philosophy and ethical theory to the practices of criminal justice agencies.
View Book Information

CRJC 212  (3-3-0)  Juvenile Justice System: A survey course designed to provide an overview of the juvenile justice system, with particular emphasis on the agencies, institutions, procedures, law, programs, and philosophies that guide the administration of juvenile justice.
View Book Information

CRJC 215  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Criminal Courts: This course focuses on the structural outlay and philosophy of the court system, with special emphasis on criminal law and procedure, court processes, and structures, constitutional guarantees, the trial process, and the roles of judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys and juries.
View Book Information

CRJC 220  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Corrections: This course examines the historical development, current changes, and future trends in correctional policies and strategies including analysis and evaluation of concepts and theories of retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, incapacitation, and other purposes of correctional reform. Special emphasis will be placed on the underlying social, legal, and ethical issues that affect various correctional strategies.
View Book Information

CRJC 222  (3-3-0)  Community Corrections: An in-depth theoretical perspective of the social, legal, and ethical issues which gave rise to the development of contemporary strategies of corrections in the community including programs such as probation, parole, other alternatives to incarceration, intermediate sanctions, and diversionary programs
Prerequisite: CRJC 200 And CRJC 220
View Book Information

CRJC 230  (3-3-0)  Criminal Evidence: A course focusing on the various types of evidence used in both civil and criminal proceedings with emphasis on the rules governing the admissibility of evidence and the procedures for handling evidentiary issues in the courtroom.
View Book Information

CRJC 243  (3-3-0)  Writing for Criminal Justice: Emphasis is placed on the development of writing skills required for careers in criminal justice, including various forms of correspondence, interoffice memos, informal reports, minutes of meetings, summaries, briefings, and presentations; proofreading, revising, and editing; writing for culturally diverse audiences; and criminal justice terminology.
View Book Information

CRJC 300  (3-3-0)  Criminal Law: An involved philosophical analysis of criminal law principles and concepts focusing on both the procedural aspects and the substantive elements of the various crimes, criminal court decisions, and the practical application of such principles and concepts in the courtroom.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 302  (3-3-0)  Prisons and Society: An advanced corrections course in which students explore the far-reaching impacts of prisons on society. The course examines the consequences of mass incarceration in the United States, not only for prisoners and ex-prisoners, but also for families and communities who have committed no crimes. The course further considers the impact of mass imprisonment on democracy and whether the social costs of incarceration have produced benefits to society in quality of life, safety, or justice.
Prerequisite: CRJC 220 And CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 304  (3-3-0)  Criminological Theory: This course exposes students to different theoretical perspectives in the study of crime and criminal justice. It acquaints students with various explanations that have been offered in an effort to understand criminal behavior and criminal justice practices within social contexts.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200 And PSYC 210 And SOCI 210
View Book Information

CRJC 305  (3-3-0)  Race, Class, and Gender in Criminal Justice: A comprehensive examination of the concepts of race, class, and gender as determinants of the structure and function of the American criminal justice system, including the relationship between race, class, gender, and crime; issues of race, class, and gender discrimination; and the ideological and political debates that both integrate and segregate theories of race, class, gender, and crime.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 311  (3-3-0)  Criminal Justice Organizations: Management and Administration: A theoretical course focusing on the organization, management, and administration of local, state, and federal criminal justice agencies with emphasis on how the structure and functions of such agencies affect the administration of justice.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 313  (3-3-0)  Victimology: This course will explore the evolution of the victim's rights movement, treatment of victims by criminal justice and other social service agencies, theoretical explanations for victimization, repeat victimization, victim treatment in other parts of the world, and successful approaches to working with crime victims.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 314  (3-3-0)  Criminal Justice Research Methods: This course covers the various methods of conducting quantitative and qualitative research. The emphasis is on research design, research instrument construction, data analysis, and reporting of results.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200 And CRJC 201 Or CRJC 215 Or CRJC 220
View Book Information

CRJC 315  (3-3-0)  Criminal Justice Statistics: This course is an overview of the various statistics techniques used in criminal justice research. Topics include measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, t-test, chi-square, regression, and correlation analysis. Emphasis is on testing hypotheses and interpretation of statistical results.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 325  (3-3-0)  Drugs and Crime: This survey course will address the phenomenon of drugs and crime. Topics to be examined include the nature of drugs, drug use, and addiction; past and present-day trends and patterns in drug availability and use; theories of drug use and addiction; the theoretical and empirical relationship between drugs and crime; drug prevention and treatment programs and their effectiveness; and a review of drug control policies in the United States and selected other countries.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 325  (3-3-0)  Drugs and Crime: This survey course will address the phenomenon of drugs and crime. Topics to be examined include the nature of drugs, drug use, and addiction; past and present-day trends and patterns in drug availability and use; theories of drug use and addiction; the theoretical and empirical relationship between drugs and crime; drug prevention and treatment programs and their effectiveness; and a review of drug control policies in the United States and selected other countries.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 333  (3-3-0)  Police and Society: A study of the critical issues facing police officers and administrators in relation to police community relations in a diverse society, with particular emphasis on police history and role in society, discretion, and strategies.
Prerequisite: CRJC 201 And CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 335  (3-3-0)  Media and Crime: This course will explore the relationship between media and crime. Students will critically analyze various forms of media through the use of content analysis and case studies. The overall focus will be the social construction of perceptions of criminals, victims, and the criminal justice system, as well as how the media is used as a tool of social control and how it affects criminal justice policy.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200 Or PSYC 210 Or SOCI 210
View Book Information

CRJC 340  (3-3-0)  White Collar Crime: A survey course designed to provide an overview of white collar crime, with an emphasis on the criminal and/or unethical or harmful acts of the rich and powerful. Specifically, the course explores the various types of white collar crimes, the characteristics of the offenders, the theories attempting to explain these acts, and the harm caused by them.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 345  (3-3-0)  Criminal Justice Leadership: This course will examine criminal justice leadership, discretionary decision-making in criminal justice, critical incident performance, and the effects of stress on criminal professionals. Students will explore the history, major trends and theories, and implementation and practice of leadership principles in the criminal justice professions.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 351  (3-3-0)  Special Problems in Criminal Justice Criminology: An advanced analysis of multiple interdisciplinary problems within the fields of criminal justice and criminology. Students will be introduced to a number of problems in criminal justice that do not receive in-depth attention in existing criminal justice courses. Specific topics to be chosen by instructor.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 355  (3-3-0)  Crime Prevention: Theory and Practice: This course examines crime prevention in theory and in practice. This survey course will review theories of crime and justice with specific implications for efforts to prevent crime. Students will trace the evolution of crime prevention efforts. Most importantly, the course will review crime prevention strategies, ranging from those designed to protect the individual to those designed to protect society at large. A particular focus will be placed on techniques linked to the environmental criminology and situational crime prevention perspectives.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 361  (3-3-0)  Comparative Criminal Justice: A theory-based comparison of the American criminal justice system with a number of selected criminal justice systems from around the world. Emphasis will be placed on how the social organization of a specific society affects the definition of crime and the administration of justice.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 370  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Students will examine one theme in-depth that is not addressed in great detail in another course. Topic will change based on the interests and expertise of the instructor and a student may retake the course to a maximum of nine credits with change of topic.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 380  (3-3-0)  Sex, Sexuality, and the Law: This is a survey course designed to give students an overview of criminal law, civil law, and legal issues as they related to sex and sexuality. This class considers why certain behaviors come to be legal or illegal, how laws that regulate sex and sexuality affect our culture, and how criminal justice professionals confront issues of sexuality within the framework of the law. Though specific topics may vary by professor or current events, they may include sexual assault, prostitution, sex trafficking, pedophilia, sting operations, abortion, hate crimes, GLBTQ rights (for civilians and CJ professionals), sex registries, and pornography.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200
View Book Information

CRJC 429  (1-1-0)  Internship Preparation Course: This course familiarizes students with issues related to the internship experience, such as finding an internship, preparing for the internship interview, learning about criminal justice in the field, being professional, understanding issues that may occur during the internship, successfully completing assignments, and ethics in the field. This course must be successfully completed before a student can register for CRJC 430, Internship in Criminal Justice.
View Book Information

CRJC 430  (3-3-0)  Internship in Criminal Justice Systems: This course provides students with the opportunity to synthesize theory and practice in a supervised work environment in a criminal justice agency, with the students' progress and performance on the job monitored jointly by the agency head and the course instructor.
Prerequisite: CRJC 429
View Book Information

CRJC 450  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Criminal Justice: This course is designed to provide criminal justice majors with a capstone experience emphasizing integration of knowledge acquired in previous courses on the institutions, policies and practices of criminal justice. Students engage in the development and production of a senior level research paper grounded in relevant criminal justice literature.
Prerequisite: CRJC 200 And CRJC 201 And CRJC 215 And CRJC 220 And CRJC 304 And CRJC 314
View Book Information

CRJC 460  (3-3-0)  Researching Criminological Theories: This is an advanced course emphasizing the research literature on major theoretical perspectives in the field of criminal justice. Students will assess the methods used, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages of those approaches. This course will be a critical evaluation of the research methods that generate data, bridging the gap between theory and research in the study of crime and deviant behavior. Students will examine the processes and challenges of conducting theoretically directed research with a focus on sampling, measurement, and analytical issues.
Prerequisite: CRJC 304 And CRJC 314 And (CRJC 315 Or STAT 202 Or PSYC 233 Or SOCI 331)
View Book Information

CSC 100  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Computers: This course covers fundamental concepts of computers and their applications using personal computers in stand-alone and networked environments, including the use of software for word processing, presentations, spreadsheets, and databases. Majors in computer science will not receive credit for this course.
View Book Information

CSC 101  (3-3-0)  Computer Programming Language (FORTRAN): This course is an introduction to FORTRAN, a problem-oriented computer language for use in scientific and mathematical problem solving.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or higher
View Book Information

CSC 102  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Visual Basic: This course will introduce students to computing using Visual Basic with emphasis on business applications. The topics for the course will include Visual Basic programming, computer concepts in relation to management, the use of an Integrated Development Environment (IDE), flowcharts, algorithms, decision making, control structures, modules, windows programming, procedures and arrays.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 higher
View Book Information

CSC 104  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Computer Science for Non-Technical Majors: This course explores topics of computer science for non-technical majors. The course covers the fundamental issues of networking, HTML, data representations, computers, algorithms, and programming. Students receive a solid grounding in the central concepts as well as in important uses of computing and information technology.
View Book Information

CSC 105  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Computer Science for Technical Majors: This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and skills needed by students who anticipate majoring in computer science or other technical majors such as mathematics or a natural science. Topics include algorithms as models of computational processes, programming fundamentals such as data models and control structures, and the computing environment and its tools, such as basic hardware, editors, compilers, and debuggers.
View Book Information

CSC 120  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Programming Methodology: This course is the first course of a two-semester sequence that provides an overview of programming methodology and program writing skills. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, problem solving and algorithm development, program structures, data types, program development, method and style, coding, debugging, testing, and documentation.
Prerequisite: CSC 105
View Book Information

CSC 130  (3-3-0)  Program Design and Implementation: This course is the second of a two-semester sequence that focuses on a disciplined approach to design, coding, and testing of programs. Topics include data abstraction, data structures, and searching and sorting algorithms.
Prerequisite: CSC 120
View Book Information

CSC 201  (3-3-0)  Computer Organization and Architecture I: This course covers the relationship between computing hardware and machine language instruction sets, implementation of high level languages on the machine and some memory related issues. The study is organized into levels in the following order of topics: fundamental building blocks such as logic gates and flip-flops and combinational and sequential logic; machine level representation of data; basic assembly language, implementation of high level language constructs, addressing modes, compilation, assembly and interpretation; memory hierarchy; interrupts. Some real world computer systems and microprocessors are used as examples, along with their hardware and the organization of their instruction sets. Assembly language programming is studied in detail.
Prerequisite: CSC 130 And MATH 150
View Book Information

CSC 202  (3-3-0)  Object Oriented Programming in C/ C++: This course focuses on object oriented programming and software development strategies in C/C++ programming language. Material includes syntax and semantics of C/C++, memory management, file processing, and network programming. Directed projects in C/C++ are an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: CSC 130
View Book Information

CSC 204  (3-3-0)  Object Oriented Programming in Java: This course focuses on object-oriented programming and software development strategies. Material includes syntax and semantics of Java, file processing, and network programming. Directed projects in Java are an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: CSC 130
View Book Information

CSC 205  (3-3-0)  Programming for Geographical Information Systems: This course covers a wide variety of programming topics necessary for gaining the ability and knowledge to develop software applications in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The course will teach knowledge of file types, database models, visualization and graphical user interface customization for databases. Hands on exercises on these topics will provide students with the practical knowledge necessary to build GIS applications on spatial and spatiotemporal databases. The course will also cover the use of dominant software in the GIS industry and also how to build custom applications on such platforms using special purpose scripting languages.
Prerequisite: CSC 105 or permission of instructor
View Book Information

CSC 207  (3-3-0)  Symbolic Programming: This course introduces the basic concepts and methods of symbolic programming. Symbolic programming involves the construction and analysis of complex symbolic expressions that can be used to represent different types of information. This course also introduces functional programming and logic programming as two widely used paradigms for symbolic computation. Course topics include recursion, list processing, tree processing, backtracking, unification and resolution.
Prerequisite: CSC 130 And MATH 150
View Book Information

CSC 209  (3-3-0)  Windows Environment Programming: This course involves how to develop and program graphical user-interfaces (GUI) using current programming toolkits and GUI tools.
Prerequisite: CSC 130
View Book Information

CSC 220  (3-3-0)  Data Structure/ Algorithms: This course explores data structures from various viewpoints: data structure design in response to a specific need, the expression of an algorithm in terms of the operations on the data structure, and complexity of operations. This course reinforces the knowledge of data structures gained in CSC 130 and extends it, particularly with regard to complexity of corresponding algorithms.
Prerequisite: CSC 130 And MATH 150
View Book Information

CSC 270  (3-3-0)  Networking Basics: This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic configurations of networks devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes.
View Book Information

CSC 300  (2-2-0)  Professional Practice in Computing: This course requires preparation and submission of a comprehensive report based on actual employment experience in a computer-science cooperative job or internship. This course is designed for course substitution for Cooperative Education courses, and it may be used only twice for a maximum of six credits. It may not be used twice in the same semester.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
View Book Information

CSC 303  (3-3-0)  Computer Organization and Architecture II: The course is a continuation of CSC 201which covers many aspects of computer architecture and implementation. Topics covered include pipelining, instruction-level parallelism; advanced cache and memory-hierarchy design issues; design issues for shared memory multiprocessors; storage systems and design of input/output systems; architectural implications for networks and distributed systems. In this course a rigorous quantitative approach is taken to examine different system design tradeoffs.
Prerequisite: CSC 201
View Book Information

CSC 310  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Numerical Method: This course focuses on computer techniques used to translate certain known computational algorithms into computer programs and on practice in use of existing mathematical library routines. Topics include linear systems of equations, curve fitting and interpolation algorithms for differentiation, solution of non-linear equations, solution of ordinary differential equations, and elementary discussion of errors.
Prerequisite: CSC 101 Or CSC 102 Or CSC 120 And MATH 241 And MATH 251
View Book Information

CSC 320  (3-3-0)  Design and Analysis of Algorithms: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the design and analysis of computer algorithms. Design techniques include divide-and-conquer, the greedy approach, and dynamic programming. Algorithm analysis topics include asymptotic notation, recurrence relations, time-space complexity, and NP-completeness. Algorithms for sorting, searching, hashing, and advanced data structures are examined.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 322  (3-3-0)  Programming Languages: This course considers the principal programming language concepts and shows how they are dealt with in the design and implementation of traditional imperative languages, functional languages, logic languages, and object-oriented languages. Topics include history, virtual machines, representation of data types, sequence control, data control, data sharing, data type checking, run-time storage management, and distributed and parallel programming constructs.
Prerequisite: CSC 201 And CSC 207 And CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 323  (3-3-0)  Principles of Database Design: This course emphasizes the concepts and structures necessary to design and implement a database management system. It will acquaint the students with current literature on the subject and give them an opportunity to use a database management system. Topics include database concepts, hierarchical, network and relational data models, data normalization, data description languages, query facilities, file organization, file security, data integrity, and reliability.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 332  (3-3-0)  Theory of Computation: This course covers basic theoretical principles embodied in formal languages, automata, computability, and computational complexity. Topics include finite automata, pushdown automata, non-determinism, regular expressions, context-free grammars, Turing machines, Godel numbering, Church's thesis, the halting problem, unsolvability, and computational complexity.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 342  (3-3-0)  Software Tools: This course covers software development on a specific platform such as Unix. Topics include general utilities, shell programming, file processing and manipulation, text patterns, software management facilities, linkers, loaders, debuggers, compilers, editors, filters, and macro processing.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 350  (2-2-0)  Service Learning: Under the supervision of the Computer Science faculty, students will hold discussion sections for introductory computer science courses and will serve as tutors and assistants in the laboratories. Students will attend a weekly lecture section to become familiar with course materials, problem-solving skills, and approaches that will aid their tutoring and assisting introductory students in completing their assignments. One credit hour shall be awarded for each four (4) hours per week of laboratory assistance. The course may be repeated up to a maximum of six (6) credit hours. Course grade is either pass (P) or not pass (NP).
Prerequisite: 18 hours of CSC credit
View Book Information

CSC 360  (3-3-0)  Intro to Computer Simulation: This course introduces simulation and modeling of systems with concentration on discrete stochastic systems. Topics include modeling and simulation techniques, Monte Carlo methods, queuing models, and computer simulation languages such as GPSS, and SIMSCRIPT. A simulation project is developed, completed, and presented by each student as a member of a project team.
Prerequisite: MATH 142 And proficiency in a programming language
View Book Information

CSC 371  (3-3-0)  Routing Protocols: This course describes the architecture, components, and operation of routers, and explains the principles of routing and routing protocols. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. Students complete a basic procedural lab, followed by basic configuration, implementation, and troubleshooting labs in each chapter.
Prerequisite: CSC 270
View Book Information

CSC 372  (3-3-0)  LAN Switching and Wireless: The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement VLANs, VTP, and inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. The different implementations of Spanning Tree Protocol in a converged network are presented. Students complete a basic procedural lab, followed by basic configuration, implementation, and troubleshooting labs in each chapter. Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network.
Prerequisite: CSC 270
View Book Information

CSC 380  (3-3-0)  Introduction to WAN (Wide Area Network): This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in enterprise networks. The course uses the Cisco Network Architecture to introduce integrated network services and explains how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principals of traffic, access control, and addressing services. Finally, students learn how to detect, troubleshot, and correct common enterprise network implementation issues.
Prerequisite: CSC 371 And CSC 372
View Book Information

CSC 390  (3-3-0)  Topics in Computer Science: This course is designed to cover contemporary topics of current interest and demands in computer and information science at the junior and senior levels. It may be repeated for credit with approval of department.
Prerequisite: CSC 220 or instructor permission
View Book Information

CSC 395  (1-1-0)  Competitive Programming: This course provides intensive training in programming towards solving particular problems in a timely fashion. The skills obtained will be very useful in the workplace as well as programming competitions. Topics include: mathematical/ logical skills for problem solving; online programming references; restricted programming environments; and collaboration for problem solving.
Prerequisite: CSC 220 Corequisite: CSC 320
View Book Information

CSC 403  (1-1-0)  Social, Ethical, and Professional Issues: This course discusses the impact of computers on society including people, business, and government. Topics include historical and social issues, security, privacy, professional responsibilities, risks and liability, and intellectual property.
Prerequisite: 18 hours of CSC credit
View Book Information

CSC 410  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Compiler Design Theory: This course introduces basic mathematical theory underlying the design of compilers and other language processors, and the implementation of the theory in practical design situations.
Prerequisite: CSC 201 And CSC 220 And CSC 332
View Book Information

CSC 431  (3-3-0)  Operating Systems I: This course is designed to develop an understanding of the organization and architecture of computer systems at the register-transfer and programming levels of system description. Major concept areas of operating systems principles and the inter-relationships between the operating systems and the architecture of computer systems are taught. Topics include system structure, process concept, CPU scheduling, process synchronization, deadlocks, and memory management.
Prerequisite: CSC 220 And Corequisite: CSC 201
View Book Information

CSC 432  (3-3-0)  Operating Systems II: This course provides for the study of advanced software techniques, especially focusing on operating systems. It presents materials that will enable the student to design, use, and analyze current and future operating systems. Topics include I/O programming, interrupt programming, memory management, processor management, device management, design and implementation of operating systems.
Prerequisite: CSC 431
View Book Information

CSC 434  (3-3-0)  Artificial Intelligence: An introduction to the history, goals, social impact, and philosophical implications of artificial intelligence. Topics include problem representation as state spaces, search, logic systems, semantic networks, frames, and neural networks. Identification of application areas such as natural language processing, expert systems, robotics, planning, and vision.
Prerequisite: CSC 207
View Book Information

CSC 451  (3-3-0)  Computer Graphics: This course introduces hardware and software components of graphics systems, and graphic application programming. Programs to deepen understanding of interactive graphics, picture plotting and input handling in an integrated manner will be written. Topics include geometrical transformation, three-dimensional concepts, windowing, clipping, segmentation, logical interaction input methods, raster algorithms, algorithms for hidden surface and hidden line removal, and shading and color.
Prerequisite: CSC 220 And MATH 241 And MATH 251
View Book Information

CSC 470  (3-3-0)  Software Engineering: This course introduces students to an intensive study of writing large programs, program design and programming style, and object-oriented development techniques in an attempt to manage the complexity of large software systems. Topics include principles of software engineering, object-oriented development, systems development, programming support environments, and software life cycles.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 473  (3-3-0)  Parallel Processing: This course gives the students basic knowledge about parallel processing. Topics include hardware architecture of parallel machines; software environment that enables parallel computing; performance analysis of parallel algorithms; techniques for developing parallel algorithms; and case studies on typical parallel algorithms.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 480  (3-3-0)  User Interface Development: A course on user-interface technology and human-computer interaction issues including user productivity, system habitability, abstraction barriers, and human factors. Topics include command languages, hierarchical menus, direct manipulation (graphical user interfaces), multimedia interfaces, multimodal interaction, and user interface management systems.
Prerequisite: CSC 220
View Book Information

CSC 490  (3-3-0)  Senior Project: This course presents a formal approach to state-of-the-art techniques in computer science and provides a means for students to apply the techniques. An integral part of the course is the involvement of students working in teams in the organization, management, and development of a large project. Project topics include software systems and methodology, computer organization and architecture, theory and mathematical background, computer security and social issues.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And 9 hours of CSC at the 300 level And 6 hours of CSC at the 400 level
View Book Information

DANC 203  (3-3-0)  Fundamentals of Dance: Beginning survey and participatory dance class that explores jazz, ballet, modern, and cultural dance styles.
View Book Information

DANC 210  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Contemporary Dance: For students who have previous training in dance (3 years or more), this course offers practice in modern and ballet techniques. The course also makes connections between jazz, cultural, and contemporary dance. Dance warm-up exercises are included to build strength, flexibility, coordination, and endurance.
Prerequisite: DANC 203 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

DANC 255  (3-3-0)  Dance History: This survey course emphasizes the historical, social, and cultural contexts of dance.
Prerequisite: HUMN 211
View Book Information

DANC 315  (3-3-0)  Modern Dance: Explorations in Techniques and Theories: This course is for students interested in modern dance. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the historical and movement dynamics of various modern dance styles. Personal movement strengths and theatricality as well as performance presentation will be emphasized to develop learners into adept performers in the art of modern dance.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
View Book Information

DANC 320  (3-3-0)  Cultural Dance for Contemporary Applications: Cultural Dance for Contemporary Applications: By exploring various dance exercises, this course analyzes the philosophical and rhythmic components of African, Caribbean, and Latin dance styles. Through an exploration of historical and social context, the course draws comparisons to contemporary dance genres, including hip hop, step, and liturgical dance. Emphasis will be on the participants' coordination, rhythm, musicality, and sense of ensemble. Students are expected to practice assignments outside of class. Previous dance experience helpful, as there will be movement repetition and corrections in class.
Prerequisite: DANC 203 Or DANC 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

DANC 455  (3-3-0)  Composition and Repertory: Workshop class intended to help students explore, define, learn, and create dances. Dance technique required in addition to rehearsals outside of class time.
Prerequisite: DANC 203 Or DANC 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

ECON 200  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurship and the Economy: This course focuses on the logic of economic decisions. This course will look at what it takes to set up, manage, and grow new ventures. In the process, the course reviews economic decision making and provides a survey of basic economic concepts. This course is designed to teach students the decision skills necessary to negotiate their roles as consumers, savers, investors, voters, and above all, as productive citizens in a global setting.
View Book Information

ECON 211  (3-3-0)  Principles of Macroeconomics: An examination of the basic concepts and principles of macroeconomics and their application to current domestic and international issues.
Prerequisite: MATH 123
View Book Information

ECON 212  (3-3-0)  Principles of Macroeconomics: An introduction to the subject of economics, with emphasis on microeconomic principles and their application to business decision making and current domestic and global issues.
Prerequisite: MATH 123
View Book Information

ECON 301  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation: Using applied economics and business principles, this course focuses on issues that face entrepreneurs who start new enterprises or create new ventures within existing firms. The topics covered in the course include the evaluation of new venture ideas; the planning, formulation and implementation of strategies for creating new ventures and finally the evaluation of economic conditions and the financing of new ventures. This course is cross listed with ENTR 301.
Prerequisite: ECON 212 And ACCT 211
View Book Information

ECON 303  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Strategy and Opportunity Analysis: This course provides a foundation for the analysis of entrepreneurial opportunities. The course reviews a variety of strategic considerations derived from managerial economics, industrial organization and entrepreneurial finance in the context of specific entrepreneurship cases. This course is cross listed with ENTR 303.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 and ECON 212
View Book Information

ECON 310  (3-3-0)  Managerial Economics: An in-depth study of the managerial decision-making process and its tools, including such topics as forecasting demand, cost analysis, pricing, capital budgeting, and risk and uncertainty.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 140
View Book Information

ECON 315  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Microeconomics: An in-depth study of the working of price mechanism within the framework of a free enterprise economy; a detailed examination of the behavior of consumers and firms, the theory of distribution, and welfare economics (with applications to international trade and personal income distribution).
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 140
View Book Information

ECON 316  (3-3-0)  Applied Macroeconomics: An in-depth study of theories of national income determination, employment, interest, inflation, balance of payments, exchange rate, fluctuations in the aggregate economic activity, and their relevance to managerial decision making.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 140
View Book Information

ECON 321  (3-3-0)  Applied Econometrics: An Internet survey course designed to teach students the decision making skills necessary to negotiate their roles as consumers, savers, investors, voters, and above all, as productive citizens in a global setting. The course also emphasizes the practical aspect of economics and examines the microeconomic (individual) and the macroeconomic (aggregate) implications of decision making.
Prerequisite: MATH 140 And BADM 216
View Book Information

ECON 322  (3-3-0)  Money, Banking and Monetary Policy: A formal examination of the role of money, banking, and financial institutions, as well as rudimentary discussion of monetary policy issues in the domestic and international economies. This course is cross listed with FINC 323.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 123
View Book Information

ECON 340  (3-3-0)  Economic Development: An examination of the leading issues and theories of economic development and their relevance to the developing countries. The course will also examine some of the unique problems of businesses in these countries.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 123
View Book Information

ECON 351  (3-3-0)  International Trade and Finance: A survey of the theories of international trade, balance of payment, exchange rate determination, international portfolio investment (including currency swaps, options and futures) international financial management (global cost, budgeting, and capital flows) and related monetary issues. This course is cross listed with FINC 354.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 123
View Book Information

ECON 430  (3-3-0)  Economic Problems: An in-depth study of current economic and social problems and their implications for business and society. Among the issues covered are: crime and the justice system, poverty, discrimination in labor markets, health care and social security, as well as government antitrust policies and regulation of markets.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 123
View Book Information

ECON 432  (3-3-0)  Industrial Organization and Public Policy: An analysis of industrial organization, vertical and horizontal relationships between firms, pricing, output, and advertising policies of firms in a variety of market structures, including a detailed study of the content, success, and failure of anti-trust legislation.
Prerequisite: ECON 315
View Book Information

ECON 440  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Economics: The culmination of the undergraduate study of economics providing opportunities for students to apply knowledge and training to the analysis of current economic problems. Students select projects of their choice and work under the supervision of the instructor.
View Book Information

ECON 450  (3-0-0)  Economics Internship: A practical course enabling students to apply their theoretical knowledge of economics/finance to real situations and to gain practical experience in business, financial industry, and government institutions. This course is cross listed with BADM 430 and FINC 453.
View Book Information

ECON 453  (3-3-0)  Financial Markets: A course in macro finance which focuses on financial markets and financial institutions. Money and capital markets and their role in the savings investments process are considered. Topics such as the market for loanable funds, flow-of-funds accounts and securitization are covered.
Prerequisite: FINC 323 Or ECON 322
View Book Information

ECON 460  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation: Study and analysis of contemporary issues and entrepreneurship and the creation of new ventures: The issues covered in the course may include the economic theory of entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial opportunities and risks caused by economic change, the role of creativity and innovation in the economy, entrepreneurial strategy, the identification of new venture opportunities, and case studies of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial ventures.
View Book Information

EDMG 400  (3-3-0)  The Middle School: An introduction to the basic principles, policies, and philosophies that undergird middle school education in the United States. (Fall and Spring)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDMG 433  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials of Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Grades: An introduction to the knowledge base, teaching strategies, materials, and resources basic to middle grades mathematics education. (Fall)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDMG 461  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials of Teaching Language Arts in the Middle Grades: An introduction to the teaching strategies, resources, and materials basic to middle grades (6-9) education. (Fall)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDMG 462  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials of Teaching Social Science in the Middle Grades: An introduction to the knowledge base, teaching strategies, resources and materials basic to middle grades social studies education. (Fall)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDMG 463  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials of Teaching Science in the Middle Grades: A brief review of the scientific principles, laws, and concepts prescribed in the knowledge base for teachers of science in the middle grades (6-9), with emphasis on science units and lesson planning, laboratory demonstrations, experimental replication, and simulated teaching experiences. (Fall)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDMG 470  (11-0-11)  Student Teaching in the Middle Grades: An internship in the public middle schools providing prospective education professionals with opportunities to observe professionals in the classroom, to practice teaching under supervision, and to participate in all other activities expected of regular in-service teachers in their role as facilitators of learning. (Fall and Spring)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDMG 498  (3-3-0)  Middle Grades Capstone Course: Provides an opportunity for students to integrate discipline-specific knowledge into a culminating course and also to explore current research topics. Each student will produce an independent work that is supervised by a specialty area faculty member. The course is student centered, self-directed, and allows individual students to pursue focused research. The paper must provide evidence that the student's research shows depth of content knowledge, integration of cross disciplinary knowledge, the ability to think critically and creatively, and expertise within the subject's major discipline. Students will make a public presentation of their findings. (Fall)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDUC 210  (3-3-0)  Technology Applications for Teachers: This course is an introduction to computers, as well as to educational technology and its uses in the facilitation of learning. The course includes the history of computers in education; ethics in technology; appropriate hardware, software, and systems connectivity; elementary computer operating procedures; computer applications; teaching and learning theories for diverse populations; instructional technology; technology integration; web evaluation rubrics; and the evaluation of educational technology. The activities presented in this course will help the candidate to acquire essential education technology knowledge and to develop the skills necessary to become a professional facilitator of learning. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
View Book Information

EDUC 211  (3-2-1)  Laboratory Experiences in Area Schools: An introduction to laboratory experiences in area elementary, middle, and secondary schools, providing facilitation opportunities for prospective education professionals to observe student-teacher interactions and to develop an understanding of learning in the school setting. Fifteen (15) hours of field experience and thirty (30) hours in the Plato instructional series are required. Documentation of Plato Profile is required. Performance on Plato Pre-Test will reduce the number of required Plato Lab hours/ supplemental instruction. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
View Book Information

EDUC 303  (3-3-0)  Teaching the Young Child with Special Needs: The course offers the foundations of early childhood education along with pioneers in the special education field as the base for child development. Policies and practices, early and current are examined along with assessment planning and screening processes, intervention practices, teaching strategies and reflection. Further, the student candidate will gain knowledge of the components needed to create an environment that supports all children's learning, teaching strategies and adaptations. Student candidates will engage in child study observations and develop two child case studies, conduct a parent interview. Thirty observation hours are included within the course.
Prerequisite: EDUC 308 And EDUC 350
View Book Information

EDUC 306  (3-3-0)  Birth Through Kindergarten Curriculum Development: This course is geared for non-teaching Birth-Kindergarten students. The course covers child development for children aged birth-kindergarten and developmentally appropriate curriculum development for these ages. Other concepts introduced are the physical environment, teaching typical and atypical children, developing lesson plans, and teacher/parent relationships. Students will develop lesson plans and create an integrated approach to curriculum development.
Prerequisite: EDUC 350
View Book Information

EDUC 308  (3-3-0)  Observation and Assessment in Preschool Education: This course is designed to focus on observation of young children, including techniques for recording observations and using them to inform instruction and parents. Emphasis is placed on understanding and using different assessment procedures and their purposes and limitations, including ongoing observation, data collection and analysis. Assessment techniques which support children's development and learning will be highlighted. Adaptations in assessments which are relevant to the children's backgrounds and values, health appraisal and referral practices as well as types of assessment specified in IEPs will be stressed. Observation, assessment, and reporting are treated as complementary process.
Prerequisite: EDUC 350
View Book Information

EDUC 309  (4-4-0)  Infant and Toddler Curriculum Development and Field Study: This course will provide 21st century Birth-Kindergarten teacher candidates with content knowledge in infant and toddler development. BK student candidates will learn theoretical frames for infant and toddler development, strategies for teaching typical and atypical infants and toddlers, how to develop an appropriate curriculum, how to create adaptive environments, and the importance of working with families. The 60 hour field study allows the BK student candidate first hand field experience in infant and toddler early learning environments.
Prerequisite: EDUC 303 And EDUC 308 And EDUC 350 And PRAXIS I And a GPA of 2.5 or higher And Admission to Teacher Education. Corequisite: EDUC 314
View Book Information

EDUC 310  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Education: A study of the origins, evolution, and interrelatedness of the principles and practices of disciplinary foundations of education and their influence on education. Field experience required. (Fall, Spring, Summer).
View Book Information

EDUC 311  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Multicultural Education and Diversity: The facilitator of learning will explore the historical development of multicultural education, definitions of multicultural education and diversity concepts, the intercultural conflicts from philosophical cultural differences, and principles guiding multicultural education. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
View Book Information

EDUC 314  (4-4-0)  Preschool Curriculum Development and Field Study: This course will provide 21st century Birth-Kindergarten teacher candidates with the content knowledge needed to work with typical and atypical children. The student candidates will learn theoretical frames in early childhood education that allow them to adapt environments that meet the needs of all children, develop an integrated approach to curriculum development, foster parent involvement, and develop a global sense in the early childhood field. The 60 hour field study offers needed hands on experience in preschool and kindergarten settings.
Prerequisite: EDUC 303 And EDUC 308 And EDUC 350 And PRAXIS I And a GPA of 2.5 or higher And Admission to Teacher Education. Corequisite: EDUC 309
View Book Information

EDUC 330  (3-3-0)  Educational Psychology and Human Development: An exploration of psychological principles and their applications to the problems of teaching and learning, including characteristics of stages in human development, theories of motivation and learning, classroom management strategies, individual differences, exceptional children, and the measurement and evaluation of student achievement and teaching strategies. Field experience required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
View Book Information

EDUC 331  (3-3-0)  Instructional Design and Assessment of Learning: An exploration of instructional design and assessment principles and their application to the problems of teaching and learning, including the design of instruction; task analysis; curriculum development; instructional match; assessment of learning; types of assessment; and the alignment of curriculum, teaching, and assessment. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
View Book Information

EDUC 350  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Birth through Kindergarten Education: This course is designed to provide an overview of child development and how the knowledge of growth and development is related to preparing appropriate experiences for birth through kindergarten children. Emphasis is placed on considering the child, family, and the community when planning curriculum experiences for preschool children. .
View Book Information

EDUC 361  (3-3-0)  Family Culture and School: This course is designed to help B-K professionals to understand the characteristics of families and the role families play in the lives of their children as their first teachers. Emphasis is placed on respecting different family structures, and values. Strategies for dealing with children with learning disabilities, home language i.e., especially language which is different from the B-K professional's language is stressed. Ethnicity, at-risk, socio-economic and health care services will also be discussed. B-K professionals will also develop strategies for getting parents involved in the school and their children's learning and development.
View Book Information

EDUC 400  (3-3-0)  The Middle School: An introduction to the basic principles, policies, and philosophies that undergird middle school education in the United States.
View Book Information

EDUC 421  (3-3-0)  Principles of Secondary Education: A comprehensive overview of the history and development of secondary education, the philosophy undergirding the knowledge base of the curriculum, and the influence of contemporary social forces in shaping the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDUC 433  (3-0-2)  Methods and Materials for Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades: An introduction to the knowledge base, teaching strategies, materials, and resources basic to middle grades mathematics education.
View Book Information

EDUC 434  (3-3-0)  Current Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education: This course is designed to provide 21st century Birth-Kindergarten teacher candidates with a global perspective of economic and social contexts that concern young children and their families in today's society.
Prerequisite: EDUC 308 And EDUC 350
View Book Information

EDUC 440  (3-3-0)  Guidance and Counseling Practicum: A practicum providing supervised counseling experiences in a true-to-life setting, with emphasis given to practical and applied aspects of counseling and various guidance activities.
View Book Information

EDUC 450  (2-2-0)  Classroom Management: An introduction to strategies for facilitating learning through better classroom management, with emphasis on the role of parents in classroom management and on counseling techniques related to management strategies and parenting. (Fall and Spring)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDUC 460  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Secondary School Subjects: A study of the objectives, materials, and teaching procedures designed to facilitate students' learning of secondary school subjects. (Fall, Spring)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDUC 461  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Teaching Language Arts: An introduction to the teaching strategies, resources, and materials basic to middle grades (6-9) education.
View Book Information

EDUC 462  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Teaching Social Sciences: An introduction to the knowledge base, teaching strategies, resources and materials basic to middle grades social studies education.
View Book Information

EDUC 463  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Teaching Science: A brief review of the scientific principles, laws, and concepts prescribed in the knowledge base for teachers of science in the middle grades (6-9), with emphasis on science units and lesson planning, laboratory demonstrations, experimental replication, and simulated teaching experiences.
View Book Information

EDUC 464  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Health and Physical Education: An introduction to activities, teaching strategies, materials, and resources applicable to the physical education of students in grades K-12.
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDUC 480  (11-0-11)  Student Teaching in the Secondary School: An internship in the public secondary school providing prospective education professionals with opportunities to observe professionals in the classroom, to practice teaching under supervision, and to participate in other activities expected of regular in-service teachers. (Fall and Spring)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

EDUC 490  (1-1-0)  Professional Education Seminar: A forum for discussions of teaching strategies, methodologies, materials, and experiences observed during the student-teaching experience and of such issues as mainstreaming, multicultural education, use of computers, new trends to facilitate learning in educational settings, and effective resume writing and interviewing techniques. (Fall and Spring)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

ELEM 320  (3-3-0)  Teaching Healthful Living in K-6: This course will provide 21st century K-6 teacher candidates with foundational knowledge and understanding of the need to develop and use healthful living choices. Teacher candidates will learn to make explicit connections to healthy choices that lead to the improvement of student learning, interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships, and overall quality of life.
View Book Information

ELEM 335  (3-3-0)  Math for 21st Century K-6 Teaching Candidates: This course provides students with foundational knowledge and understanding of school mathematics. Content will include common mathematical knowledge, problem solving, reasoning and proof, number sense, numerical operations, spatial sense, patterns, relationships and functions, and algebraic thinking.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
View Book Information

ELEM 400  (6-6-0)  Teaching Communication Skills in K-6: This course is designed to give an introduction to the basics of reading instruction with emphasis on emergent reading, the initial stages of reading development, and primary and intermediate reading programs. Also, it is designed to encourage critical study of current practices, teaching methodologies, strategies, and resources for teaching language arts and visual arts in the elementary school. Course requirements include a practicum in a partner elementary school classroom.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
View Book Information

ELEM 401  (6-6-0)  Teaching Math and Science in K-6: In this course, K-6 teacher candidates develop their understanding of mathematical conventions and process skills as well as the principles of scientific inquiry. Emphasis is placed on the use of best practices that promote integrative teaching and inquiry based learning, such as problem solving, reasoning, communication, connection, representation, and debating issues involving science and technology from a global perspective.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
View Book Information

ELEM 402  (6-6-0)  Teaching Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts in K-6: This course enables K-6 teacher candidates to develop teaching approaches that help students to develop global literacy and critical thinking skills. The course focuses on the creation of interdisciplinary lessons and units that integrate the social sciences, humanities, and the arts in ways that enhance classroom instruction and student learning.
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education
View Book Information

ELEM 451  (3-3-0)  Classroom Management for Elementary Teachers: An introduction to the strategies for facilitating learning through effective classroom management, parent counseling, and guidance strategies for the elementary classroom. This course helps elementary pre-service and in-service teachers develop systematic strategies and techniques for effectively leading students to cooperate with the teacher and each other, and to be on task and engaged in planned learning activities. An internship in an elementary school is required.
View Book Information

ELEM 471  (12-12-0)  Elementary Teacher Internship: An internship in the public schools providing prospective elementary education professionals with opportunities to observe professionals in the classroom, to plan and deliver instruction under supervision, to participate in professional development activities, and to engage in other activities expected of regular in-service teachers.
View Book Information

ELEM 491  (2-2-0)  Professional Seminar: A series of seminars on selected teacher education topics, to include teaching strategies, knowledge, skills, abilities, and documentation needed for the initial teaching year, and preparation for the assessments required for North Carolina licensure.
View Book Information

ENGL 108  (4-3-2)  English Grammar and Usage: This course introduces students to issues of grammar and usage within an integrated literacy program that includes reading, writing and speaking. Standard grammatical and rhetorical conventions are examined to assess their current significance for acceptable social expression, especially in academic prose.
View Book Information

ENGL 110  (3-3-0)  English Composition I: A course designed to give extensive practice in the writing process, with emphasis on expository forms appropriate to everyday personal, business, and academic writing. When taken for 4 credits, two lab hours are included.
View Book Information

ENGL 120  (3-3-0)  English Composition II: A course that continues practice in the composing process, with emphasis on argumentation and research. The course involves gathering, analyzing, and documenting information from secondary sources. When taken for 4 credits, two lab hours are included.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 211  (3-3-0)  World Literature I: A study of major works of the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance, focusing on representative genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 212  (3-3-0)  World Literature II: A comparative study of major works of the Enlightenment, the Romantic Age, the period of Realism and Naturalism, and the Modern World.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 220  (3-3-0)  African-American Literature I: An historical and critical exploration of African American writers' contributions to American fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction, beginning with writers of the 1700s and continuing through 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 222  (3-3-0)  History of the English Language: An historical study of the nature of the language from its beginnings to the present.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 223  (3-3-0)  African-American Literature II: A continuation of an historical and critical exploration of African American writers' contributions to American fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction, beginning with the 1900s and proceeding to the present.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 230  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Linguistics: An introduction to the inductive method of studying language, exploring the phonological, morphological, and syntactical aspects of language, dialectical variations, graphemics, sound, spelling, linguistic changes, bilingualism, field linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, uses of linguistics, and related topics.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 231  (3-3-0)  Advanced Grammar: A reinforcement of students' skills in grammatical analysis, focusing on the major theories of grammar and on the study of language acquisition in light of current research.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 232  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Film and Visual Literacy: This course will introduce students to basic concepts in film and other visual media such as video and Internet imaging. The course introduces students to formal vocabulary and methodology for developing the ability to consider visual texts critically. Through understanding and application of the basic concepts of film language, students will learn how elements such as editing, lighting, and composition within the frame, cinematography, and sound combine to constitute filmic discourse. In order to understand development in these categories, consideration will be given to film history.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 233  (3-3-0)  Hip Hop: Poetry, Politics, and Pop Culture: This course draws connections between rap, oral traditions, and African American poetry. The course also explores hip hop’s intersection with commerce, social policy, ethics, and civic engagement. Students will read articles, watch videos, and listen to podcasts addressing not only artistry, but also such issues as censorship, sexism, obscenity, social responsibility, and race politics in the U.S. as they relate to hip hop culture. Students will write essays, reports, and raps, and will also engage in service learning projects.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 240  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Literature: An introduction to the major genres of literature, with intensive work in developing the critical skills of reading, evaluating, and interpreting literary works and in writing critical papers about literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 241  (3-3-0)  Writing With Style: The study and practice of techniques used in traditional genres and emerging media, with emphasis on developing and adapting patterns of arrangement and stylistic techniques to particular audiences or for particular effects, as well as foundations of analyzing and incorporating visual and narrative rhetorical strategies.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 250  (3-3-0)  Women in Literature: This course examines the roles of women in literature as characters readers, and writers. Included in the readings are short stories, novels, novellas, essays, poetry, and drama, all by women and about women. The course will provide a historical overview of women's writing and will focus on the challenges of women writing, the creation and treatment of women's lives in literature, the form and content of women's writing, and the literary and feminist theories that discuss women's place in history and society by investigating the evolving conditions of women. Also the course examines how women represent themselves and what their expectations and hopes are for their own and daughters' futures.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 253  (3-3-0)  Images of Women: This course introduces students to traditional and nontraditional images of women as they have appeared in film, music, art, and literature of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. This course will encourage students to interrogate images of women in the popular culture of the present day.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 260  (3-3-0)  North Carolina Writers: A study of literature by writers who are from or have settled in North Carolina. The course draws from a range of novelists, playwrights, poets, and short story writers to engage students in a study of voices from across North Carolina who question, reflect, and define what it means to be North Carolinian.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 271  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism: This course will introduce students to contemporary trends in literary theory and criticism against the historical background, which contemporary theory is often a reaction against.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
View Book Information

ENGL 300  (3-3-0)  Children's Literature: An introduction to works of children's literature from a variety of ethnic origins and genres including folklore, myths, epics, biographies, fiction, poetry, and informational books.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 301  (3-3-0)  Adolescent Literature: A study of literature for and about the adolescent, examining reading programs and approaches to literature genres and modes characteristic of the literature, and essential elements of literary works for the adolescent.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 310  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Folklore: An introduction to the forms, aesthetic characteristics, and social contents of oral literatures and folk traditions, folktales, legends, myths, folksongs, proverbs, riddles, customs, and beliefs.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 311  (3-3-0)  English Literature I: A survey of the literature of England from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 312  (3-3-0)  English Literature II: A continuation of the survey of English literature, extending from the Romantic period to the present. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 320  (3-3-0)  The Renaissance: A study of the prose and poetry of representative authors of the Renaissance, including dramatists other than Shakespeare.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 321  (3-3-0)  American Literature I: A survey of the major writers of America from the earliest efforts at colonization through the Civil War.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 322  (3-3-0)  American Literature II: A survey of the major writers of America from the Civil War to the present. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 323  (3-3-0)  Literature of the Bible: A literary overview of the Bible, with major emphases on the stylistic and formal influences of the Bible in world literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 330  (3-3-0)  The Seventeenth Century: A survey of the metaphysical poets.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 331  (3-3-0)  American English Dialects: A study of dialectical variations in American English, emphasizing the reasons for historical, regional, and social variations in American English.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 335  (3-3-0)  Issues in Professional Writing: This foundation course engages students in applying rhetorical principles, research methods, analytical skills, and technologies to problem-based writing projects that model communications challenges faced by professional writers in complex, real-world settings. Students will consider political, cultural, ethical, and practical issues relevant to professional writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 340  (3-3-0)  Short Prose Fiction: A study of representative modern British, American, and continental writers of the short story and the short novel, with emphasis upon the techniques of the genre. Course offered as needed.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 341  (3-3-0)  Advanced Composition: A study of rhetorical strategies, sentence combining, editing, logic and persuasion, diction, usage, and research methods.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 342  (3-3-0)  Creative Writing: An introduction to various forms of modern fiction and poetry, with opportunities for the creation of original poetry and fiction.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 343  (3-3-0)  Teaching and Tutoring Writing: A study of composition as a discipline and current issues in the field of teaching and tutoring writing in secondary school English classes. This course emphasizes effective teaching strategies for high school English composition.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 344  (3-3-0)  Business and Professional Writing: This course explores the principle of effective writing in business and administration with special focus on the elements of mechanics, organization, technical style, and documentation. Students will learn various forms of writing commonly used in business communications, such as business letters, memorandums, reports and proposals. The course emphasizes clarity, conciseness, organization, format, style, tone, and correctness.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 345  (3-3-0)  Technical Writing: This course explores effective writing in technical genres, with a focus on adjusting content, organization and style for various audiences including peer, managerial, and lay audiences. Students will examine and produce various technical documents, such as instructions or manuals and reports, and engage in usability testing and revisions of documents.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 346  (3-3-0)  Creative Nonfiction Workshop: This course will introduce students to the art and craft of writing creative nonfiction for publication. Students will focus on three subgenres within the discipline: reportage (editorial writing), the personal essay, and travel writing. The course is conducted as a workshop; thus, students will submit drafts of their work to their classmates, receive verbal and written feedback, and revise accordingly. Towards the end of the course, students will develop a portfolio of their work for grading and submit at least one revised work to a journal or magazine for publication.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 347  (3-3-0)  Writing Children's Literature: This course will provide students with an understanding of how to write for children in different literary genres and with an opportunity to create written manuscripts for children. The course will also consider issues and trends in the children's publishing industry.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 350  (3-3-0)  Modern Poetry: A study of British and American poetry from Whitman, Dickinson, and Hardy to the present, with emphasis on the major poets of the twentieth century.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 360  (3-3-0)  Modern Drama: A survey of works of major playwrights from lbsen and Strindberg to contemporaries such as Pinter and Stoppard.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

ENGL 370  (3-3-0)  Junior Seminar: Directed study on special topics in English conducted by members of the department.
Prerequisite: Junior standing
View Book Information

ENGL 380  (3-3-0)  Legal Studies Seminar: This course helps students to develop their skills in logical reasoning, reading comprehension, and analytical reasoning. Students in the seminar will focus on preparing for a career in law. Completion of this course requires successful participation in out of class workshops.
View Book Information

ENGL 401  (3-3-0)  Chaucer: A course on The Canterbury Tales and on other works selected from the Chaucer canon, with consideration of literary, social, religious and philosophical backgrounds of the time.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 411  (3-3-0)  Shakespeare: A study of selected major Shakespearean dramas, including comedies, histories, and tragedies, and of Shakespeare's development as a dramatist. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 412  (3-3-0)  Eighteenth Century: A survey of the major English writers from the Restoration - the age of Dryden, of Pope, and of Johnson to the beginning of Romanticism and a study of the rise of the English novel in the eighteenth century.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 420  (3-3-0)  Portfolio Development: This course emphasizes the analysis and production of professional reports and presentations. Students will read, analyze, format for printing and transmission, draft, revise and edit reports in multiple formats, for multiple audiences, and for flexible purposes.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 431  (3-3-0)  The Novel: A study of the novel as a literary mode with emphasis on selected major works.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 432  (3-3-0)  Romantic Poetry and Prose: A study of the major British Romantics, with an examination of representative works by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats in their cultural and critical contexts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 470  (3-3-0)  Senior Capstone Course: Directed study on special topics in English conducted by members of the Department.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing
View Book Information

ENGL 480  (3-3-0)  Internship: Supervised practical experience in a professional setting.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Senior Standing
View Book Information

ENGR 101  (1-1-0)  Introduction to Engineering and Problem Solving: This course provides general information on engineering disciplines, common engineering practices, the engineering profession and history, engineering education, engineering design, engineering ethics and engineering opportunities from the instructor and/or invited speakers. Preliminary work on a design project will be undertaken by student teams.
View Book Information

ENGR 102  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Engineering Graphics: This course introduces the students to skills of effective communication through engineering drawing. Topics include drawing instruments, lettering, geometric drawing, freehand sketching, orthographic projection, CAD systems, and examples of actual engineering drawings.
View Book Information

ENGR 103  (1-1-0)  Introduction to Computing Environments: This course introduces the students to the computing environments that enable engineering students to get familiar to the hardware/software used in performing computer related tasks. Topics include: basic operation of the computer operating systems; office application tools; engineering application tools; and web page creation. The course will emphasize the computing environment in the field of engineering computation so the students are ready when they transfer to the engineering departments of participating universities.
View Book Information

ENGR 201  (3-3-0)  Engineering Statics: Basic concepts of forces in equilibrium are introduced. Distributed forces, frictional forces are discussed. Inertial properties are analyzed in application to machines, structures, and systems.
Prerequisite: PHYS 121 And MATH 242 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

ENGR 202  (3-3-0)  Engineering Dynamics: An introduction to kinematics of particles in rectangular, cylindrical, and curvilinear coordinate systems; energy and momentum methods for particles; kinetics of systems of particles; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies in two or three dimensions; motion relative to rotating coordinate systems.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And ENGR 201
View Book Information

ENGR 204  (3-3-0)  Properties of Engineering Materials: This course is an introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and constitution of metallic and nonmetallic materials and the relationship among these principles and the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of engineering materials. The influence of the atomic the and grain structure of structural materials on mechanical properties will be considered. The effects of mechanical and heat treatments on structure and properties of materials are examined. Fatigue and creep of materials, fracture toughness, mechanical and non-destructive evaluation, environmental effects are studied. This course also addresses design considerations as well as characteristics of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And PHYS 121
View Book Information

ENGR 206  (3-3-0)  Probability and Statistics for Engineers: This course is a calculus based introduction to probability and statistics with emphasis on Monte Carlo simulation and graphical display of data on computer workstations. Statistical methods include point and interval estimation of population parameters and curve surface fitting (regression analysis). The principles of experimental design and statistical process control are introduced.
Prerequisite: MATH 241
View Book Information

ENGR 214  (3-3-0)  Solid Mechanics: Concepts and theories of internal force, stress, strain, and strength of structural elements under static loading conditions. Constitutive behavior for linear elastic structures is discussed. Deflection and stress analysis procedures for bars, beams, and shafts will be considered. Introduction to matrix, analysis of structures will be made.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And ENGR 201 And ENGR 204 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

ENTR 300  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Thinking and Creativity: This course will promote entrepreneurial thinking and explore a variety of problem solving approaches. Students will experience what it means to fully engage their brains to discover the patterns that produce breakthrough ideas. This course will explore the creative process and help students identify their own creative problem-solving styles.
View Book Information

ENTR 301  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation: Using applied economics and business principles, this course focuses on issues that face entrepreneurs who start new enterprises or create new ventures within existing firms. The topics covered in the course include the evaluation of new venture ideas; the planning, formulation and implementation of strategies for creating new ventures and finally the evaluation of economic conditions and the financing of new ventures. This course is cross listed with ECON 301.
Prerequisite: ECON 212 And ACCT 211
View Book Information

ENTR 303  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Strategy and Opportunity Analysis: This course provides a foundation for the analysis of entrepreneurial opportunities. The course reviews a variety of strategic considerations derived from managerial economics, industrial organization and entrepreneurial finance in the context of specific entrepreneurship cases. This course is cross listed with ECON 303.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ECON 212
View Book Information

ENTR 312  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Marketing: This course clarifies key marketing concepts, methods, and strategic issues relevant for start-up and early-stage entrepreneurs. Topics addressed include: (1) Marketing issues facing entrepreneurs today; (2) Identification and evaluation of marketing opportunities; (3) Achieving competitive advantages given limited marketing resources, and (4) Major marketing/sales tools that are useful in an entrepreneurial setting. This course is cross listed with MKTG 312.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

ENTR 315  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Finance: This course will help students to develop the understanding and skills necessary to become more effective stewards of their small business finances. This course integrates all aspects of planning using finances in a person's small business. It incorporates the preparation of a financial plan for a small business that involves the preparation of balance sheets, income statements, sources of financial resources and the various forms of business ownership. Various techniques and tools will be reviewed, as will the understanding of income tax laws and their impact on small business. This course is cross listed with FINC 315.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

ETCE 101  (1-1-0)  Foundations of Ethics and Civic Engagement: This course provides an introductory foundation for students' orientation to civic engagement, social action, and the relationship between learning and engaged citizenship. The course also introduces students to the contexts, issues, skills, and experiences of citizenship and civic leadership in a democratic society. Finally, the course assists students with developing students' readiness to accept personal and social responsibility, as well as their preparation for responsible citizenship.
View Book Information

ETCE 102  (1-1-0)  Intermediate Ethics and Civic Engagement in Action: This course builds upon the foundation of students' orientation to civic engagement, social action, and the relationship between learning and engaged citizenship developed in ETCE 101. The focus of this course is to introduce students to the contexts, issues, skills, and experiences of citizenship and civic leadership in a democratic society. Finally, the course assists students with developing students' readiness to accept personal and social responsibility, as well as their preparation for responsible citizenship.
Prerequisite: ETCE 101 or instructor permission
View Book Information

ETCE 103  (1-1-0)  Advanced Ethics and Civic Engagement in Action: This course builds upon the foundation of students' orientation to civic engagement, social action, and the relationship between learning and engaged citizenship developed in ETCE 101. The course also builds upon ETCE 102's introduction of students to the contexts, issues, skills, and experiences of citizenship and civic leadership in a democratic society. The focus of this course is to assist with developing students' readiness to accept personal and social responsibility, as well as their preparation for responsible citizenship.
Prerequisite: ETCE 102 or instructor permission
View Book Information

ETCE 200  (3-3-0)  Ethics and Civic Engagement in Action: This course provides a foundation for students' orientation to civic engagement, social action, and the relationship between learning and engaged citizenship. The course also introduces students to the contexts, issues, skills, and experiences of citizenship and civic leadership in a democratic society. Finally, the course assists students with developing students' readiness to accept personal and social responsibility as well as their preparation for responsible citizenship.
View Book Information

FINC 100  (2-2-0)  Financial Literacy: This course examines basic financial terms and concepts and is designed to provide students with some of the skills and knowledge that they need to manage their finances and be informed consumers. Topics covered include savings, credit and debt; budgeting; student loans; credit cards; insurance; buying a car; your first house, etc
View Book Information

FINC 311  (3-3-0)  Principles of Finance: A course in basic financial management, including the study of the nature of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, and long-term investment decisions.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And (ECON 211 Or ECON 212)
View Book Information

FINC 315  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Finance: This course will help students to develop the understanding and skills necessary to become more effective stewards of their small business finances. This course integrates all aspects of planning using finances in a person's small business. It incorporates the preparation of a financial plan for a small business that involves the preparation of balance sheets, income statements, sources of financial resources and the various forms of business ownership. Various techniques and tools will be reviewed, as will the understanding of income tax laws and their impact on small business. This course is cross listed with ENTR 315.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 320  (3-3-0)  Financial Management: A continuation of FINC 311 emphasizing the use of analytical tools dealing with capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, cost of capital with consideration of long-term financing, expansion, and problems of small businesses in connection with decision-making techniques.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 323  (3-3-0)  Money, Banking, and Monetary Policy: A formal examination of the role of money, banking, and financial institutions, as well as rudimentary discussion of monetary policy issues in the domestic and international economies. This course is cross listed with ECON 322.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212 And MATH 123
View Book Information

FINC 330  (3-3-0)  Personal Finance: A study of problems of money management, with special attention to credit borrowing, saving and funds allocation among stocks, bonds, insurance, property, and mutual investment companies.
View Book Information

FINC 336  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Finance: This course focuses on the financial assessment, acquisition, allocation, and control of financial aspects of health care organizations. Topics include application of financial management principles to the unique decision-making in healthcare industry, budgeting processes, cost allocation, fees structure, and management control process.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 340  (3-3-0)  Risk Management and Insurance: A focus on the identification, analysis, and measurement of potential losses and on the alternative methods of managing them, with risk management being treated broadly and insurance treated in depth as a method of risk transfer.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 350  (3-3-0)  Real Estate: A presentation of the fundamental economic aspects of real property, with special attention to the changing character of the urban economy and its effect on land values and land utilization.
View Book Information

FINC 354  (3-3-0)  International Trade and Finance: A survey of the theories of international trade, balance of payment, exchange rate determination, international portfolio investment (including currency swaps, options and futures) international financial management (global cost, budgeting, and capital flows) and related monetary issues. This course is cross listed with ECON 351.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 And ECON 212
View Book Information

FINC 410  (3-3-0)  Investments: A survey of portfolio models and theories; factors affecting corporate and other securities as portfolio choices; the organization of capital markets and the analysis and evaluation of securities.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 411  (3-3-0)  Investment Analysis: This course provides an introduction to fixed income markets in the world. These markets include dealings in government, corporate debt instruments, mortgages, OTC (over-the counter) and exchange traded securities. The course topics include: the description and analysis of fixed income instruments; term structure of interest rates theory; evaluation of fixed income securities; portfolio management; asset backed securities; dynamic investment strategies; and other topics of current relevance to these markets.
Prerequisite: FINC 410
View Book Information

FINC 412  (3-3-0)  Security Analysis: This course provides an overview of the securities industry and the different types of securities available for inclusion in a portfolio. Consistent with some objective a more detailed approach is then applied to evaluation of the different classes of securities.
Prerequisite: FINC 410
View Book Information

FINC 420  (3-3-0)  Commercial Bank Management: A study of the fundamental principles underlying the management of a commercial bank; capital funds; assets and liability management; value maximization; legal and operational constraints.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 424  (3-3-0)  Financial Statement Analysis: This course is a study of the process of business analysis through the evaluation of financial statements. Topics include analysis of financial statements and ratio, strategic, prospective, equity, and credit analysis. This course presumes an understanding of finance and accounting principles in order to successfully master the course content. While some finance and accounting concepts may be reviewed, this course is about the analysis and evaluation of financial information. Students must be able to express the analysis of cases and other course work in writing that meets professional standards. This course is cross listed with ACCT 424.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ACCT 212 with a grade of B or better And FINC 311 with a grade of C or better.
View Book Information

FINC 430  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Banking and Finance: A study of contemporary issues in Finance with areas of analysis drawn from corporate finance, investments, and financial markets and institutions.
Prerequisite: FINC 320
View Book Information

FINC 431  (3-3-0)  Options and Futures: This is an introductory course in financial futures and options. The course topics include: the description of futures, forward, and options markets; the determination of forward and future prices, interest rate and currency futures and swaps; properties of stock options; valuation of stock options with Binomial and Black-Scholes models; other types of options including stock index options, options on futures, and interest rate options; and hedging strategies using futures and options.
Prerequisite: FINC 410
View Book Information

FINC 440  (3-3-0)  International Financial Management: This course examines factors that are critical to the financial decision making process in a global economic environment. Our approach will be from the perspective of a financial manager in private business enterprise.
Prerequisite: FINC 320
View Book Information

FINC 450  (3-3-0)  Financial Markets: A course in macro-finance which focuses on financial markets and the financial institutions that serve them. Money and capital markets and their role in the savings and investment are considered. Topics such as the market for loanable funds, flow-of-funds accounts, and securitization are covered.
Prerequisite: FINC 311
View Book Information

FINC 453  (3-3-0)  Economics and Finance Internship: A practical course enabling students to apply their theoretical knowledge of economics/finance to real situations and to gain practical experience in business, financial industry, and government institutions. This course is cross listed with BADM 430 and ECON 450.
View Book Information

FINC 460  (3-3-0)  Current Problems of Banking: This course is intended to survey the current condition of the banking industry. Special emphasis is placed on topics and issues that are most relevant to students preparing to begin careers in banking and related fields.
Prerequisite: FINC 420
View Book Information

FORL 210  (3-3-0)  Foreign Language I: This course is an introduction to a designated foreign language, and is intended for students with no prior knowledge of the language and culture it represents. Emphasis will be placed on the basic language skills (comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture. Course may be repeated for credit for different languages.
View Book Information

FORL 220  (3-3-0)  Foreign Language II: This course is a continuation of FORL 210. FORL 220 will continue to improve on the language and cultural knowledge and skills acquired in FORL 210 with emphasis on comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as pragmatics.
Prerequisite: FORL 210
View Book Information

FORL 250  (3-3-0)  Literature in Translation: This course is a survey of the literature written in foreign language but studied in English translation. It differs from ENGL 211, 212 in that they survey a wide variety of literary works originally in several languages while FORL 250 focuses on the literature of a single language. Students may take FORL 250 more than once for credit if taken in different languages.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
View Book Information

FORS 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Forensic Science: This course introduces the basic principles and relationships between the applications of chemistry, biology, and physics to forensic science as they relate to the criminal investigative process. The course is designed to give students insight into the many areas of forensic science and to study the newest techniques used by forensic laboratories. Corequisite: PHYS 111 or PHYS 121
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And BIOL 150 And PHYS 111 (may be taken concurrently) Or PHYS 112 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

FORS 300  (3-3-0)  Forensic Professional Practice: Provides basic knowledge of proper crime scene procedures and evidence processing that includes proper collection, documentation and preservation of physical evidence. In addition, the ethical issues relating to pre-trial procedures, courtroom testimony, and qualifications of expert witnesses will be presented.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And CRJC 202 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

FORS 325  (3-2-2)  Molecular Biology: An in-depth study of the structure, function, and biochemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Isolation, purification and structural modification of DNA and protein in laboratory exercises will be utilized to provide an understanding of the various DNA/protein methodologies and their applicability to forensic science. This course is cross listed with BIOL 325.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And CHEM 221 And CHEM 222 And ZOOL 310
View Book Information

FORS 400  (4-3-2)  Forensic Microscopy: This course will familiarize students with the microscopy equipment common to most modern crime labs. The course will enable students to select mode-appropriate equipment and techniques and to make basic observations of the physical and optical properties of common evidential materials. This class is an introduction to microscopic analysis, identification, and characterization of materials, such as glass, hair, fiber, paint, and soil.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122
View Book Information

FORS 410  (3-3-0)  Technical Writing in Forensic Science: This course provides students with a working knowledge of various types of technical and scientific communication, including writing proposals, instructions, and forensic reports for both specialist and nonspecialist. It aims to enable the students to present information professionally in clear, concise and appropriate format. It deals with ethical issues involved in professional technical writing. Formal elements of reports with library research are also emphasized.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And FORS 300
View Book Information

FORS 420  (4-3-2)  Forensic Chemistry I: Applications of spectroscopic methods to forensic science. Background and applications of ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transfer infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy will be discussed. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in chemistry.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And FORS 300 And CHEM 222 Corequisite: FORS 400
View Book Information

FORS 430  (4-3-2)  Forensic Chemistry II: Applications of separation methods to forensic science. Techniques covered will include gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in chemistry.
Prerequisite: FORS 420
View Book Information

FORS 431  (3-2-2)  Population Genetics: A study of genetic and ecological forces that influence the structure of populations with two (2) hours of laboratory exercises and experimental studies. Students will evaluate the effects of random genetic drifts, mutations, natural selection, inbreeding, assortative mating, molecular evolution and quantitative/ecological genetics on populations. This course is cross listed with BIOL 431.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 410
View Book Information

FORS 445  (4-2-4)  Forensic Serology: This course will introduce the concepts, theories, and principles used in the forensic identification of biological evidence, including laboratory analysis of physical properties for the identification, confirmation, and species origin of biological materials such as blood, fibers, hair, saliva, and semen, as well as immunological and microscopic techniques. The course applies methods that are used in forensic laboratories. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in biology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And FORS 200 And FORS 300 Corequisite: FORS 400
View Book Information

FORS 450  (4-2-4)  Forensic DNA Analysis: This course will introduce the concepts, theories, and principles used in the forensic identification of biological evidence. The course will cover the characterization of body fluids including the determination of their human origin. Hands on laboratory techniques will be used to identify biological fluids for DNA extraction, quantitation, amplification, profiling, and interpretation. The course introduces laboratory methods, techniques, and instruments used in similar forensic laboratories. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in biology.
Prerequisite: FORS 325 And FORS 445
View Book Information

FORS 460  (4-0-8)  Capstone: This course will evaluate students' overall understanding and mastery of forensic science and criminal justice theories and applications of various laboratory techniques for evidence identification, application of analytical techniques, and communication skills. The course will enable students to select the most appropriate equipment and techniques to make basic observations of physical evidence and test this evidence by using the appropriate equipment and techniques of evidential materials analysis.
Prerequisite: FORS 410 And FORS 430 Or FORS 450 And FORS 431
View Book Information

FREN 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary French I: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of French-speaking peoples, with emphasis on the basic language skills. Laboratory practice required.
View Book Information

FREN 111  (3-3-0)  Elementary French (Honors): An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of French speaking peoples, with treatment in greater breadth and depth than in French 110. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experiences.
View Book Information

FREN 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary French II: A continuation of studies in the language, literature, and culture of French speaking peoples begun in FREN 110, including further development of the basic language skills, with special attention to improving oral language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: FREN 110
View Book Information

FREN 121  (3-3-0)  Elementary French II (Honors): A continuation of honors studies in the language, literature, and culture of French-speaking peoples begun in FREN 111, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on increasing proficiency in oral language skills. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experiences.
View Book Information

FREN 211  (3-3-0)  Intermediate French I: Intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of French speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with increased emphasis on reading comprehension and writing in French. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: FREN 120
View Book Information

FREN 212  (3-3-0)  Intermediate French II: A continuation of intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of French-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on idiomatic usages and complex grammatical structures. Laboratory experience required.
Prerequisite: FREN 211
View Book Information

FREN 311  (3-3-0)  French Conversation I: A course focusing on increasing fluency in conversational French. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: FREN 212
View Book Information

FREN 312  (3-3-0)  French Conversation II: Conversation and Composition: A course focusing on developing the level of proficiency in the basic language skills necessary to complete advanced courses taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 311
View Book Information

FREN 321  (3-3-0)  French Civilization and Culture: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of French speaking peoples, with attention given to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture. Taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 212
View Book Information

FREN 322  (3-3-0)  Survey of French Literature I: A study of representative French literary works from earliest times to 1800. Taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 321
View Book Information

FREN 331  (3-3-0)  Survey of French Literature II: A study of representative French literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 321
View Book Information

FSCN 322  (3-3-0)  Fire Investigations: A course intended to provide the student with advanced technical knowledge on rules of law, fire scene analysis, fire behavior, evidence collection and preservation, scene documentation, case preparation and testifying. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 345  (2-2-0)  Firefighter Fitness and Wellness: This course is applied in nature and is directed at enhancing the physical and mental health of the participant through the application and understanding of the cardio-muscular fitness requirements of the modern firefighter. It also provides an overview of the ramifications of emergency worker stress and potential coping strategies that can be utilized to cope with work induced stress. This course will enable the participant to design a personal and/or work-team fitness regime. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 350  (3-3-0)  Fire Prevention Organization and Management: This course examines the factors that shape fire risk and the tools for fire prevention, including risk reduction education; codes and standards; inspection and plans review; fire investigation; research; master planning; various types of influences; and strategies. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration Majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 360  (3-3-0)  Applied Fire Service Ethics: Ethics in the provision of fire, rescue, and emergency medical services are challenging and complex. No other government services are granted the same degree of public trust. This course increases student proficiency in making ethical decisions in the provision of emergency service. Students will discover how to consider problems in terms of their ethical implications. Students will also learn a model for making ethical decisions. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 377  (3-3-0)  Fire-Related Human Behavior: An exploration of the dynamics of human behavior in fire incidents. The functions and implementation of prevention practices, program, codes, and ordinances are stressed. The concepts of risk, personal invulnerability, role, and group dynamics are examined in relation to design aspects of buildings and mitigation of the effects of fire on modern society. Discussion deals with proper ways of conducting post-fire interviews and emphasizes the psychological effects of communications during emergencies. Open to Fire and Emergency Servijces Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 390  (3-3-0)  Fire Dynamics: This course is an examination of the dynamics within the context of firefighting and its application to fire situations. Course includes the examination of fire, including combustion, flame spread, flashover, and smoke movement; applications to building codes; large-loss fires; and fire modeling through a consideration of the physics and chemistry of fire and combustion. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 400  (3-3-0)  Political and Legal Foundations of Fire Protection: An examination of the legal, political, and social aspects of the government's role in public safety, including the American legal system, fire department operations, employment and personnel issues, fire officials' roles, and legislative and political influence. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 402  (3-3-0)  Managerial Issues in an All Hazards Environment: This course examines regulatory issues, hazard analysis, multiagency contingency planning, response personnel, multiagency response resources, agency policies, procedures and implementation, public education and emergency information systems, health and safety, command post dynamics, strategic and tactical considerations, recovery and termination procedures, and program evaluation. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 412  (3-3-0)  Advanced Fire Administration: This course examines organizational and leadership tools for fire service administrators, including community approaches to administration, core skills, planning and implementation, leading change, and community management. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 421  (3-3-0)  Incendiary Fire Analysis and Investigation: This course examines technical, investigative, legal, and managerial approaches to the arson problem, including principles of incendiary fire analysis and detection, environmental and psychological factors of arson, gang-related arson, legal considerations and trial preparations, managing the fire investigation unit, intervention and mitigation strategies, and shaping the future. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
Prerequisite: FSCN 322 Or permission of program director
View Book Information

FSCN 422  (3-3-0)  Applications of Fire Research: An examination of the rationale for conducting fire research, various fire protection research activities, and research applications, including fire test standards and codes, structural fire safety, automatic detection and suppression, life safety, and firefighter health and safety. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 430  (3-3-0)  Fire Service Personnel Administration: Basic and advanced concepts and processes of designing, implementing, and administering the personnel functions of fire service organizations. Emphasis is placed on human resource planning, job classification, job analysis, equal opportunity organizations and resources, affirmative action, recruitment, retention, development, performance evaluation, and assessment centers. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 440  (3-3-0)  Fire Service Organizational Dynamics: An exploration and examination of organizational dynamics, including organization culture as it applies to the American fire service. Knowledge gained through this course will assist the fire service administrator in solving complex organizational challenges. The focus will be on the many varieties of theories about public organizations; the consideration of the relationship between theory and practice; and the development of a coherent, integrated understanding of fire service organizations. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 441  (3-3-0)  Topics in Fire Department Management: A course designed to cover contemporary topics of interest in the area of fire department administration. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 455  (3-3-0)  Community Risk Reduction for Fire and Emergency Services: This course provides a theoretical framework for the understanding of the ethical, social, organizational, political, and legal components of community risk reduction, as well as a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk reduction plan. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
View Book Information

FSCN 490  (6-0-0)  Fire Service Internship: An experience that offers an opportunity to apply content learned in the classroom to complete a project in management or investigation in the workplace. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
Prerequisite: Completion of a majority of Core Curriculum requirements and permission of program director.
View Book Information

GEOG 110  (2-2-0)  Environmental Literacy: An introductory course on the impact human beings have on the environment as well as the basic relationship between our environment and environmental policy. The course will discuss local, regional, and global environmental issues such as food resources, water resources, and energy resources. The focus will be on the transition to university life and campus resources that support sustainability for students as members of the campus community.
View Book Information

GEOG 210  (3-3-0)  Principles of Geography: An introductory study of the physical and cultural elements of the surface of the earth, emphasizing the geographic relationships and surveying the interaction between human beings and their physical environment.
View Book Information

GEOG 220  (3-3-0)  World Regional Geography: A geographical study of the world by realms or regions and of the basic relationship between the physical and cultural elements within the major realms of the world, with a detailed study of some selected regions.
View Book Information

GEOG 250  (3-3-0)  Basic Map Reading: An introductory map-reading course, with emphasis on map interpretation techniques and on the most commonly used types of maps and their interpretations.
View Book Information

GEOG 260  (3-3-0)  Population Geography: A study of the patterns of population distribution on the surface of the earth, emphasizing patterns of population growth, density, and movement and alterations related to changes in selected socioeconomic and cultural phenomena.
View Book Information

GEOG 270  (3-3-0)  Human Beings and the Environment: An examination of the interaction between human beings and the environment on the surface of the earth, with attention to specific types of ecosystem degradation and to solutions of resulting problems.
View Book Information

GEOG 300  (3-3-0)  Medical Geography: The geographic study of human ecology and health on the surface of the earth, with an analytical study of the world patterns of disease distribution and their cultural/environmental interactions, as well as alterations of disease patterns because of developments in various cultures.
View Book Information

GEOG 310  (3-3-0)  Economic Geography: A geographic analysis of the distribution of economic activities on the surface of the earth, with emphasis on present-day patterns and trends of production, distribution, and utilization of the world's major commodities.
View Book Information

GEOG 311  (3-3-0)  Cartography: A study of principles and techniques of constructing maps and other graphic devices, emphasizing the construction of map projections and their uses, problems of scales, the interpretation of contour maps, lettering and sketching techniques, and graphic presentation of statistical materials.
View Book Information

GEOG 312  (3-3-0)  Advanced Cartography: A study of advanced principles and techniques of map and graphic construction and interpretation.
View Book Information

GEOG 313  (3-3-0)  Aerial Photo Interpretation: A study of the basic principles of aerial photographic mapping and the interpretation of aerial photos in terms of both physical and cultural/human geography, with emphasis on detecting and identifying the natural/physical and human/cultural elements of the geographic complex on the surface of the earth from the perspective of space.
View Book Information

GEOG 314  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Remote Sensing: An introductory study of remote sensing, emphasizing its application to environmental and land use analyses of the earth.
View Book Information

GEOG 316  (3-3-0)  Computer Cartography: An introduction to the cartographical uses of computers and computer graphics, with emphasis on applications of computer mapping to geographic phenomena and problems.
View Book Information

GEOG 317  (3-3-0)  Computer Techniques in Geography: A course emphasizing computer usage and techniques applicable to studies of the geographical phenomena on the surface of the earth and to the study of geography as an academic subject.
View Book Information

GEOG 320  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Geographic Information Systems: An introductory course covering the theory and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) This course includes an overview of general principles of GIS and practical experience in its use.
View Book Information

GEOG 321  (3-3-0)  Geography of the Soviet Union: A study of the physical features, natural resources, population distribution, and human/cultural geography of the Soviet Union across time.
View Book Information

GEOG 322  (3-3-0)  Geography of Latin America: A regional study of the physical environmental conditions, natural resources, economic development, and social and political conditions of Latin American countries.
View Book Information

GEOG 325  (3-3-0)  Applied Geographic Information Systems: Students will learn to apply geospatial technologies, particularly GIS, to real world problems by creating detailed maps and interpreting relationships based on space (connectivity, containment, etc.). Students will work with advanced concepts such as tools, behavior, and scripting and symbol creation and apply the results to spatial problems.
View Book Information

GEOG 330  (3-3-0)  Geography of Africa: A geographic study of the continent of Africa, with differentiating descriptions of its countries and regions, its distinctive character in comparison with other continents, and its current problems and developments.
View Book Information

GEOG 340  (3-3-0)  Cultural Geography: An examination of human experience as it occurs in different natural settings, with analyses of symbolic and material elements of culture, focusing on those areas with landscape and environment manifestations and using specific case studies to determine how processes such as innovation, diffusion, and cultural change function.
View Book Information

GEOG 350  (3-3-0)  Physical Geography: An examination of the physical systems and features of the earth, with emphasis on detailed analyses of systematic functions and interrelations of the geophysical processes of the earth's physical/natural environment.
View Book Information

GEOG 360  (3-3-0)  Climates: A study of world climatic patterns with emphasis on the classification and distribution of various types of climates on the surface of the earth and their influence on human beings.
View Book Information

GEOG 370  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Meteorology: An introductory study of the atmospheric phenomena of weather, emphasizing analyses of the weather elements, weather production processes, and techniques of weather forecasting.
View Book Information

GEOG 400  (3-3-0)  Introduction to City and Regional Planning: A study of the principles, concepts, and reality of city and regional planning from the past to the present, with emphasis on urbanization and planning, and on analyses of current urban problems and forces responsible for urban and regional growth.
View Book Information

GEOG 411  (3-3-0)  Industrial Geography: A study of manufacturing regions and major industries of leading industrial nations of the world, with attention to factors relating to the nature, location, and development of manufacturing industries.
View Book Information

GEOG 412  (3-3-0)  Ecology: A geographic study of the ecological system of the earth and the relationship of earth's organisms to their environment, with special attention to the effects of human activities on the ecosystem.
View Book Information

GEOG 420  (3-3-0)  Conservation of Natural Resources: A study of conservation practices related to natural resources of the earth, emphasizing techniques for preserving the earth's waters, soils, forests, grasslands, animals, and human resources.
View Book Information

GEOG 421  (3-3-0)  Geography of the South: An analytical study of the physical, historical, economic, social and cultural environment of the present day southern United States, acquainting students with the geography of the South and with the distinctive and changing character of the South.
View Book Information

GEOG 430  (3-3-0)  Geomorphology: An examination of the geomorphological processes and factors creating and affecting the development of the natural landscape of the earth.
View Book Information

GEOG 431  (3-3-0)  Political Geography: A study of the geographical nature of political states, emphasizing their organization, power, and boundaries, and the geographic influences on their internal and external relations, with additional attention to concepts of geopolitics and associated contemporary problems.
View Book Information

GEOG 440  (3-3-0)  Urban Geography: A geographical survey of the internal and external spatial relationships of cities and city systems, with special emphasis on patterns of growth, distribution, and functioning within and among cities in various parts of the world, particularly in the United States.
View Book Information

GEOG 480  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Geography: Research in geographic thought and concepts and their practical applications, with emphasis on quantitative and empirical analyses of some specific problems of physical and cultural/human elements of the earth's environment from perspectives of geographic research.
View Book Information

GEOG 490  (3-3-0)  Geography Internship: The internship offers students the ability to apply subject matter learned in the classroom to real world settings. Students gain experience in the workforce and can use the skills acquired in this course in future employment opportunities.
Prerequisite: GEOG 320 Or Permission of instructor
View Book Information

GEOL 311  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Geology I: An introductory course in physical geology concerned principally with the composition of the earth's crust and the processes that act to change its upper surface.
View Book Information

GEOL 312  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Geology II: A continuation of GEOL 311, including studies of the active internal processes of the earth, such as plate tectonics and earthquakes, and of the earth's interior composition and structure, with introductions to historical geology and the succession of life forms that formerly lived on the earth.
Prerequisite: GEOL 311
View Book Information

GERM 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary German I: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples, with emphasis on the basic language skills. Laboratory practice required.
View Book Information

GERM 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary German II: A continuation of studies in the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples begun in GERM 110, including further development of the basic language skills, with special attention to improving oral language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: GERM 110
View Book Information

GERM 211  (3-3-0)  Intermediate German I: Intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with increased emphasis on reading comprehension and writing in German. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: GERM 120
View Book Information

GERM 212  (3-3-0)  Intermediate German II: A continuation of intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on idiomatic usages and complex grammatical structures. Laboratory experience required.
Prerequisite: GERM 211
View Book Information

GERM 310  (3-3-0)  Advanced Conversation and Phonetics: A course focusing on developing the level of proficiency in the basic language skills necessary to complete advanced courses taught exclusively in German.
Prerequisite: GERM 212
View Book Information

GERM 321  (3-3-0)  German Civilization: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of German-speaking peoples, with attention to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture. Taught exclusively in German.
Prerequisite: GERM 310
View Book Information

GLBL 200  (3-3-0)  Global Literacy Experience I: An officially sponsored university instructional experience that enhances students' understanding of one or more of the components of the "Global Literacy" core curriculum requirement. Experiences at the 200 level identify, examine, and synthesize aspects of the following: global diversity; global heritage, such as the arts, sciences, philosophy, literature, economics, language, and athletics; and global interdependence. Academic credit is based on the following formula: one semester credit is equivalent to 750 minutes of documented instruction. The course may be repeated for credit provided the subject matter is different.
View Book Information

GLBL 300  (3-3-0)  Global Literacy Experience II: An officially sponsored university instructional experience that enhances students' understanding of one or more of the components of "Global Literacy" core curriculum requirement. Experiences at the 300 level primarily examine and synthesize aspects of global diversity, global heritage, and global interdependence. Academic credit is based on the following formula: one semester credit is equivalent to 750 minutes of documented instruction. The course may be repeated for credit provided the subject matter is different.
View Book Information

GLBL 400  (3-3-0)  Global Literacy Experience III: An officially sponsored university instructional experience that enhances students' understanding of one or more of the components of "Global Literacy" core curriculum requirement. Experiences at the 400 level primarily synthesize the following: one’s self-awareness with global diversity; the diffusion of global heritage through globalization; and models of global interdependence. Academic credit is based on the following formula: one semester credit is equivalent to 750 minutes of documented instruction. The course may be repeated for credit provided the subject matter is different.
View Book Information

HCM 200  (3-3-0)  Ethics for Health Professions: In an era of advanced technology, economic pressure, and national discussions about universal affordable healthcare, professionals require a strong foundation of practice-based ethics to inform their decisions. This course provides an introduction to the theories and principles of ethics and civic responsibility. The course also focuses on the application of ethical theory to a wide range of problems that commonly occur within healthcare settings. In addition, students will explore and understand how ethical theories can inform practice within the healthcare industry.
View Book Information

HCM 310  (3-3-0)  Organization of Health Care System: This course provides an introduction to the Health Services Industry. The course will examine key components, characteristics, and organization of the health care system as well as trends and management challenges in the provision of care to a diverse population.
View Book Information

HCM 311  (3-3-0)  Principles of Health Care Management: This course presents the foundation principles and dynamics of health care management, the healthcare system, and basic concepts and skills in administration. The institutional, social, and political forces in the field of healthcare are analyzed. Topics include fundamentals of management in healthcare and contemporary issues.
View Book Information

HCM 312  (3-3-0)  Medical Terminology/Health Care Managers: This course provides an introduction to the language of health care. The course will examine key terms managers and health care providers need to be successful in the health care industry.
View Book Information

HCM 313  (3-3-0)  Medical Coding for Managers: This course will prepare healthcare managers ot understand and improve their competence in medical coding as it relates to billing and insurance by providing an introduction as well as in-depth study of Current Procedural Terminology, International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD 9-CM), and the third-party reimbursement. By the end of the course the student will be prepared to sit for the state exam to become a certified medical coder.
Prerequisite: HCM 312
View Book Information

HCM 330  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Policy and Law: This course provides an introduction to a wide range of topics in the area of health policy, and law. Students will become familiar with the evolution of health care policy as well as potential legal and problems in various health care settings. They will also learn to differentiate between legal and ethical problems. Among the subject areas covered are licensing, professional liability, confidentiality, informed consent, professional relationships, access issues, antitrust, and bioethical issues, with particular emphasis on how these areas impact management practice.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And BADM 209
View Book Information

HCM 350  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Quality Management: This course presents the basic principles and tools associated with quality management. The topics include the definition of quality and its function in health services; pioneers in quality; strategic quality planning; quality tools; customer voice; market voice; statistical quality control and international issues and standards.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And BADM 216
View Book Information

HCM 370  (3-3-0)  Marketing Management in Healthcare: This course provides a foundation for managing the marketing function in healthcare. Particular attention is given to both the use of marketing tools to facilitate attainment of organizational goals in healthcare and the unique issues faced by the healthcare marketers.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ECON 211 Or ECON 212
View Book Information

HCM 390  (3-3-0)  Comparative Health Systems: Innovation is required to meet the challenges of healthcare delivery, thus the ability to compare and evaluate global approaches enables the healthcare professional to consider and adopt ideas that can be applied to their own system of care. This course examines factors that impact healthcare delivery worldwide, through analysis of the characteristics of global healthcare delivery systems and the governmental, economic, social and political forces that influence them. Special emphasis is placed on comparison to the U.S. healthcare system.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311And HCM 330
View Book Information

HCM 410  (3-3-0)  Human Resource Management for Health Services: Human Resource Management for Health Services
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311
View Book Information

HCM 420  (3-3-0)  Managed Care: This course is intended to provide a foundation for managed care and practice and contractual arrangements, including the evolution of managed care as well as an exploration of the various tools that have been developed to improve systems of care. Particular emphasis is placed on contemporary/integrated systems of care.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And HCM 330 And HCM 350
View Book Information

HCM 430  (3-3-0)  Leadership for Health Service Organizations: This course provides a foundation to study leadership theory and practice as they relate to health service organizations. Further, the course seeks to provide an understanding of how healthcare leaders can achieve organizational goals through concrete behaviors and actions across interconnected disciplines and diverse populations.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And HCM 410 Or MGMT 410
View Book Information

HCM 450  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Senior Seminar: This course provides an introduction to health services research for senior students within healthcare management, including fundamentals of health services research and managerial epidemiology. A health services research project with a focus on managerial applications will be facilitated through a service learning format.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And HCM 330 And HCM 350 And HCM 420
View Book Information

HCM 460  (3-3-0)  Health Services Research I: This class is designed as an introduction to health service research as it applies to healthcare delivery, facilitating the basic skills needed to design a successful research proposal.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And HCM 330 And HCM 350 And HCM 420
View Book Information

HCM 461  (3-3-0)  Health Services Research II: This class is designed as an introduction to health service research as it applies to healthcare delivery, facilitating the basic skills needed to design a successful research proposal.
Prerequisite: HCM 460 And permission of instructor
View Book Information

HCM 470  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Strategy: This course introduces you to the complexities of strategy analysis, strategy formulation, and strategy implementation in healthcare organizations. The course is divided into different topic areas to investigate these three major processes. We will discuss the basic concepts underlying each topic area. Additionally, we will discuss cases and examples that describe how a real organization confronted successfully (or unsuccessfully) the issues covered in the topic. Two capabilities are of particular importance: (1) the ability to critically evaluate the profit potential of industries or environments and deal with the threats and opportunities presented by each; and (2) an understanding of how organizations work. Because this is a writing intensive course, organization, logical consistency, grammar, and clarity of your writing will impact your grade.
Prerequisite: BADM 215 And ENGL 344 And FINC 311 And FINC 336 And HCM 310 And HCM 311 And HCM 370 Or MKTG 311
View Book Information

HCM 490  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Internship: This course provides supervised field work for exemplary senior students within the healthcare management concentration. Students work with health service professionals within the host organization to expand their expertise in solving management problems and to increase their awareness of the issues involved in the day to day operations of the organization. Student performance will be evaluated on the basis of an appraisal by the preceptor and a detailed project report submitted by the student.
Prerequisite: HCM 310 And HCM 311 And HCM 330 And HCM 420 And Senior standing And Instructor permission
View Book Information

HEED 112  (2-2-0)  Health and Wellness: This course deals with basic concepts of personal and community health in a complex modern society. Sexuality, population planning, mental health, nutrition, fitness, health care delivery system, and diseases of infectious and non-infectious nature are considered. Health behavior and behavior change for quality living for the individual and community are stressed.
View Book Information

HEED 212  (3-3-0)  Health Promotion and Wellness: An introduction to health concepts as they relate to the individual, family, and community. Designed to acquaint students with behaviors that promote health and reduce risks to diseases.
View Book Information

HEED 300  (3-3-0)  Human Sexuality: A study of concepts and methods for sex education programs, including physiological, social and educational aspects of human sexuality, and emphasizing preparation for teaching about human sexuality in K-12 programs.
View Book Information

HEED 301  (3-3-0)  Drug Education: An in-depth study of the use and abuse of legal and illegal drugs, alcohol and tobacco; the psychological and sociological factors associated with drug experimentation and abuse; and the psychosocial and physiological effects of drugs on health and behavior.
View Book Information

HEED 310  (3-3-0)  Mental and Emotional Health: A study of the fundamental principles underlying emotional health, including human relationship, stress, social-learning adjustments, personality, and life styles.
View Book Information

HEED 311  (3-3-0)  Environmental Health: A study of major areas of environmental health, including the health concerns, problems, and diseases arising from environmental pollutants.
View Book Information

HEED 320  (2-2-0)  Introduction to Health Education: This is an introductory course to school health and to community health education. The basic philosophy, principles, and content of health education are discussed as basic background for suggested solutions of health problems. Twelve hours field experience is required.
View Book Information

HEED 321  (3-3-0)  Health in Early Childhood Education: An introduction to the principles, content, practices, and procedures basic to health education in early childhood, K-3.
View Book Information

HEED 322  (3-3-0)  Health in the Intermediate Grades: An introduction to the principles, content, practices, and procedures basic to health education at the intermediate level.
View Book Information

HEED 340  (3-3-0)  Organization and Administration of School/Community Health Education: A study of modern theories and guiding principles in the organization and administration of school-community health education programs, including coverage of such topics as program planning, fiscal management, vital statistics, and laws pertaining to school-community health.
View Book Information

HEED 372  (3-3-0)  First Aid and Safety Education: A study of the principles and practices of first aid and safety techniques, with emphasis on emergency procedures and safety-related agencies and their services. Also includes the teaching of first aid and safety K-12.
View Book Information

HEED 401  (3-3-0)  School Health Program: A study of the roles of the classroom teacher, the school nurse-teacher, and other related personnel in the development and implementation of a total school health curriculum, including content, methods, and materials appropriate to elementary, intermediate, and secondary levels.
View Book Information

HEED 410  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Epidemiology: The principles of epidemiology used in the investigation of each event, such as disease, accidents, and other health-related problems. These principles will be demonstrated by a class project of epidemiologic investigation. An in-depth study of major public health problems, with emphasis on the K-12 classroom teacher as the change agent for a healthier society through health education.
View Book Information

HEED 411  (3-3-0)  Public Health Problems: An in-depth study of major public health problems, with emphasis on the K-12 classroom teacher as the change agent for a healthier society through health education.
View Book Information

HEED 420  (3-3-0)  Nutrition: An introduction to the principles and concepts of nutrition, with emphasis on the importance of nutrition education for the development of healthy eating habits.
View Book Information

HEED 421  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Teaching Health K-6: An introduction to the content, principles, practices, and procedures in health education at the elementary level, with special focus on the role of the teacher in the elementary school health program.
View Book Information

HEED 431  (3-3-0)  Adapted Physical Education: A study of principles and methods for adapting health and physical education programs to handicapping conditions. These principles and methods will be demonstrated by evaluations of physical, perceptual-motor and postural fitness levels, and the design, implementation, and evaluation of an active diversified adapted program. A 25 clock hour laboratory experience is required.
View Book Information

HEED 441  (3-3-0)  Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education: An introduction of fundamental statistics for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness of health education and community health programs.
View Book Information

HIPO 300  (3-3-0)  Contemporary African American Politics: A study of selected issues related to African-Americans living in America, with emphasis on contemporary political organizations and activities of African-Americans.
View Book Information

HIPO 310  (3-3-0)  Political History of Contemporary China: A study of political development in China from the Revolution of 1911 through the consolidation of power by Mao Tse-tung in the postwar period and continued through successive leaders to the present.
View Book Information

HIPO 341  (3-3-0)  Constitutional Law and History: A study of basic principles of the constitutional system, with particular emphasis upon cases that deal with the framework of the American federal system.
Prerequisite: POLI 210
View Book Information

HIPO 342  (3-3-0)  Civil Rights and Constitution: A study of constitutional principles and their applications as they affect individual civil rights.
Prerequisite: POLI 210
View Book Information

HIPO 440  (3-3-0)  Modern Ideologies: A study of the principal modern political ideologies: capitalism, communism, fascism, and socialism.
View Book Information

HIST 100  (3-3-0)  Social Institutions: An historical survey of the development of the basic social institutions such as family, religion, politics, economics, the arts, and education presented as a case study of the African-American experience from past civilizations in Africa to contemporary American society.
View Book Information

HIST 110  (3-3-0)  World History to 1600: An historical survey of the development of civilizations in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas from their beginnings to 1600, with attention to the governmental, social, religious, economic, political, intellectual, and aesthetic movements and activities that contributed to their development. Offered every semester.
View Book Information

HIST 120  (3-3-0)  World History since 1600: An historical survey tracing the continuing development of civilization from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present day, with attention to the governmental, social, religious, economic, political, intellectual, and aesthetic movements and activities that contributed to their development, with special consideration of the movements, ideologies, revolutions, and wars that helped to shape modern history. Offered every semester.
View Book Information

HIST 210  (3-3-0)  African-American History: A study of African-American social, economic, cultural and political history, with emphasis on the contributions of African-Americans to the social, cultural, economic, and intellectual life of American society and with attention to the role of African-Americans in the exploration, settlement, and development of America, the experience of slavery, and the struggle for civil rights. Offered every semester.
View Book Information

HIST 211  (3-3-0)  The United States to 1865: A survey of American history from the colonial period through the Civil War. Offered every semester.
View Book Information

HIST 212  (3-3-0)  The United States since 1865: A survey of American history from the era of Reconstruction to the present. Offered every semester.
View Book Information

HIST 270  (3-3-0)  An Introduction to Africa in the World: This course seeks to explore the distinguishing features of the peoples and topography of Africa. Moreover, efforts will be made to assay the interactions of these peoples with the outside world in a way that will reveal the truth about them rather than to recycle myths and prejudices.
View Book Information

HIST 301  (3-3-0)  The Era of Civil War and Reconstruction: A study of the War Between the States, with an examination of the forces that led to the outbreak of the conflict between North and South, the ramifications of the Union victory, and the problems of reconstruction following the war.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 302  (3-3-0)  Modern America 1914 to Present: A study of the United States as a modern industrial nation and as a world power, particularly since 1945.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 311  (3-3-0)  Early Modern European History, 1600-1789: A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Europe from the late Reformation to the outbreak of the French Revolution.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 312  (3-3-0)  Modern European History, 1789 to the Present: A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Europe from the French Revolution to the present.
Prerequisite: HIST 311
View Book Information

HIST 321  (3-3-0)  American Social History: A study of the daily life, institutions, intellectual developments, and artistic achievements in America from the Agrarian Era, 1607-1861, through the Urban Industrial Era, 1861 to the present.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 322  (3-3-0)  Ethnic Minorities in American Urban History: A study of the impact of urban life on the history of minority groups in the United States, with special emphasis on the relationships between the urban social order, the condition of minority groups since 1900, and the contributions of minority groups to the American city.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 323  (3-3-0)  Oral History: A study of basic oral history techniques, including interviewing, transcribing, and writing a narrative based on the materials produced.
View Book Information

HIST 331  (3-3-0)  History of Modern East Asia: A study of modern China from the decline of the Manchu Dynasty in the mid-nineteenth century through the events of Tienanmen Square, and of modern Japan from the Meiji Restoration through its post-World War II development as a leading industrial nation.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 340  (3-3-0)  American Diplomatic History: A study of American diplomacy from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on U.S. foreign relations in the twentieth century. Offered on request.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 350  (3-3-0)  History of Latin America: A study of the political, economic, and social institutions and problems of contemporary Latin American nations.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 351  (3-3-0)  Ancient History: A study of the origins, development, and contributions of the ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman civilizations, through the fall of the Roman Empire.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 352  (3-3-0)  North Africa and the Middle East: A study of Islamic civilization and culture in areas of the southern and eastern rims of the Mediterranean Sea spanning the time period from the seventeenth century to the present day.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 353  (3-3-0)  History of Mexico: An introduction to the social, cultural, economic, and political history of Mexico, primarily since independence (1808), with a background on the colonial and Pre- Colombian periods.
View Book Information

HIST 362  (3-3-0)  American Military Experience: The evolution of the American military profession from colonial times to the post-World War II era, with attention to such topics as American military concepts, strategies tactics, doctrines, and technology, and the influence of military experience on American society.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 370  (3-3-0)  Africa South of the Sahara: A study of ancient, medieval, colonial, and modern civilizations and nations in sub-Saharan Africa, with attention to issues relating to African heritage and to the rise of contemporary African nations and cultures.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 371  (3-3-0)  Renaissance and Reformation: A study of the rise of individualism and humanistic thought after 1300, the fragmentation of religious and political authority in Europe, the Reformation, and the religious wars through the Treaty of Westphalia.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 372  (3-3-0)  History of Women in the Western World: A survey of the changes in the status of women in Western society from ancient to contemporary times, with special attention given to intergroup differences and to minority women.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 375  (3-3-0)  Women In Africa: This course explores women's history by region as it has changed over time under pre-colonial, colonial, and independence governments. Topics include customs of female circumcision, bride wealth, and multiple wives; changes in the control over women's labor and women's roles in politics; and in the effect of structural adjustment on women.
View Book Information

HIST 380  (3-3-0)  Medieval Europe: A study of Europe from the fourth through the fourteenth centuries, with special emphasis on the characteristics of medieval political organization and socioeconomic life, the formative influence of the Church, and the cultural legacy of the Middle Ages.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
View Book Information

HIST 390  (3-3-0)  North Carolina History: A study of the history of the Tar Heel state from its origins to the present. Offered every year.
View Book Information

HIST 400  (3-3-0)  History of the South: A study of the development of the southern United States since 1820, with special emphasis on race relations and on industrial growth in the region in the mid-twentieth century.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 410  (3-3-0)  Survey of American Urban History: A study of the forces that have shaped the development of the American city from the colonial era to the present time, with special attention given to the social, economic, political, and cultural effects of urban life on city dwellers.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 430  (3-3-0)  Twentieth Century Europe: A study of contemporary European issues originating from the two world wars, including the social and political upheavals of the twentieth century, with emphasis on the role of eastern Europe in the decade of the 1990┐s.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
View Book Information

HIST 431  (3-3-0)  Russia to 1917: A study of politics and society in Imperial Russia and the collapse of the empire in the Revolution of 1917.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
View Book Information

HIST 432  (3-3-0)  History of the Soviet Union: A study of the Soviet system and Soviet foreign policy from the Revolution of 1917 through its collapse in 1989.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
View Book Information

HIST 441  (3-3-0)  History of England: A study of the development of modern England from the English Revolution to the present, with emphasis on the rise and fall of the British empire and the evolution of the Parliamentary system.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
View Book Information

HIST 442  (3-3-0)  History of Modern Germany: A study of German history through five periods: before unification (1815-1870), under Bismarck, under Wilhelm II, between the wars, and since 1945.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
View Book Information

HIST 450  (3-3-0)  History of Terrorism and Insurgency: A study of the terrorism phenomenon throughout history, culminating in the present threat posed by transnational terrorism. Special attention is given to subjects including: different forms of historical terrorism, such as political and religious; asymmetrical warfare; the terrorism-media relationship; and anti- and counter- terrorism.
View Book Information

HIST 451  (3-3-0)  French Revolution and Napoleon: A study of the collapse of the Ancient Regime, including an examination of the causes and effects of its demise; Napoleon's attempt to establish a new order in Europe under French hegemony; the Congress of Vienna.
Prerequisite: HIST 311
View Book Information

HIST 460  (3-3-0)  Problems in American History: A study of selected issues in American history.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
View Book Information

HIST 470  (3-3-0)  Colonialism and Neo-Colonialism: A study of the political, economic, and strategic interests of the Great Powers in colonies and former colonial possessions during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312 And HIST 331 Or HIST 370
View Book Information

HIST 480  (3-3-0)  Problems in European History: A study of selected problems and issues in the history of Europe.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
View Book Information

HIST 490  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Selected Topics: In-depth studies in selected areas of special interest, with supervised research and directed readings required. (For History or Social Science majors and minors.)
View Book Information

HIST 491  (3-3-0)  Methods of Historical Research: An introduction to conventional methods of historical research and to new techniques in oral history, family history, and quantitative history. For History or Social Science majors and minors.
View Book Information

HIT 360  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Information Systems: This course focuses on the applications of information technology to improve the quality of healthcare and to lower costs in providing healthcare services. Issues to be covered in this course include: information security, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR), the organization of IT functions, and IT project management.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And HCM 310 And HCM 311
View Book Information

HIT 370  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Information Applications: This course focuses on the application of information technology to improve the quality of healthcare and to lower costs in providing healthcare services. Issues in information security, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR), the organization of IT functions, and IT project management will be covered in this course.
Prerequisite: HIT 360
View Book Information

HIT 380  (3-3-0)  Healthcare Business Intelligence: This course introduces students to the area of business intelligence and how it is used in healthcare. The need for business intelligence, concepts of business intelligence, big data in healthcare and enabling technologies will all be covered in this course.
Prerequisite: HIT 360 And MIS 320
View Book Information

HIT 460  (3-3-0)  Advanced Healthcare Information Systems: This course expands the concepts taught in HIT 360 (Healthcare Information Systems). The course focuses on the application of information technology to improve the quality of healthcare and to lower costs in providing healthcare services. Issues in information security, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the implementation of electronic medical records (EMR), the organization of IT functions, and IT project management will be covered in this course.
Prerequisite: HIT 360
View Book Information

HUMN 211  (3-3-0)  Humanities: Music, Art, and Ideas I: An interdisciplinary survey course examining works of art, literature, music, philosophy, and religious thought, focusing on major stylistic developments, intellectual movements and cultural achievements of the ancient and medieval eras in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Completion of HUMN 211 is recommended before enrollment in HUMN 212.
View Book Information

HUMN 212  (3-3-0)  Humanities: Music, Art, and Ideas II: The second part of an interdisciplinary survey course examining works of art, literature, music, philosophy, religious thought, and focusing on major stylistic developments and intellectual movements from the Renaissance to the present day.
View Book Information

HUMN 215  (3-3-0)  Arts in Performance: Designed to introduce students to the basic tools an artist uses to create a work of art and to develop an awareness and appreciation of the history and ideas in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts through study and experience with these arts. Students are required to attend scheduled art, music, and theatre events outside of class and engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts. Attendance at pre- and post- production discussions and at live performances is required.
Prerequisite: HUMN 211 Or HUMN 212
View Book Information

INTL 200  (3-3-0)  Intelligence and National Security: This course focuses on the concept, framework and applications of U.S. Intelligence and its role in the creation and implementation of national security policies.
View Book Information

INTL 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Intelligence Analysis: Research, Methods and Writing: This specialized course concentrates on the analytical production of strategic intelligence and serves as an introduction to the craft of intelligence analysis.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 220  (3-3-0)  Intelligence Operations: This course covers human Intelligence (HUMINT), covert action and counterintelligence, as well as, the organizations, missions, and functions of international intelligence and security services.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 300  (3-3-0)  Law Enforcement Intelligence: This course examines the role of Intelligence in the production of public policy and Law Enforcement implementation.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 310  (3-3-0)  Corporate Intelligence: This course combines the study of traditional “corporate espionage” with the intelligence and counter-intelligence requirements inherent in protecting and managing intellectual property and national security information found in the industrial sector.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 320  (3-3-0)  Intelligence and Military Operations: This course introduces the principles of Intelligence support for military operations including definitions and problems of strategic, operational and tactical intelligence; various aspects of military operations; and significant past, present and future events, operations and implications involving intelligence and military operations.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 330  (3-3-0)  The History of Intelligence: This course explores the principles of the history of Intelligence. Topics include definitions and problems of the history of Intelligence; various aspects of the history of Intelligence; and significant past, present and future events, operations and implications involving the history of Intelligence.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 400  (3-3-0)  Advanced Intelligence Analysis: Research, Methods and Writing: This advanced course serves as follow-on to the introductory analysis course and provides for the application of knowledge and further skill development of the analytical tradecraft. Special topics include analytical research, methodologies and writing.
Prerequisite: INTL 210
View Book Information

INTL 410  (3-3-0)  Ethics and Intelligence: This course will examine the pertinent role of ethics in the business of Intelligence within the context of national security. Ethical theories, the role of ethics, protection of individual civil rights, ethical dilemmas posed by several current challenges and ways to make ethics a larger part of the national security dialogue will be addressed.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 420  (3-3-0)  Anthropological Issues in Intelligence: This course investigates the historical and contemporary cultural, religious, and social distinctions between the world's peoples as these variables bear on the Intelligence function.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 430  (3-3-0)  Strategic Intelligence Issues: Exploring a number of vital and current issues relative to strategic Intelligence, this advanced course is intended to assess intelligence requirements and develop strategies for the successful use of intelligence in U.S. foreign and security policy in the first decades of the twenty-first century.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 440  (3-3-0)  Emerging International Security Threats: This course surveys a suite of emerging international threats which pose serious security risks to international development, stability and progress. The purpose is to assess the future international security environment in order to help develop government policy, strategy and plans for dealing with emerging security threats like genocide; organized crime; narcotics trade; human trafficking; weapons proliferation; environmental, energy, health and financial perils; regional issues; and other related topics.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 450  (3-3-0)  International Terrorism: This course focuses on a wide range of relevant topics from the historical background and roots to the sociological, economic, and psychological aspects of International Terrorism and to the actual operational factors and policy implications.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 460  (3-3-0)  National Security Policy: This course will focus on U.S. national security and related-policy and the domestic and global factors affecting implementation.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 462  (3-3-0)  International Weapons Proliferation and Weapons of Mass Destruction: This course explores worldwide proliferation of weapons and military hardware with special attention given to weapons of mass destruction.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
View Book Information

INTL 470  (3-3-0)  Internship: This course is designed for students to serve an external internship. As an intern, the students will be supervised in an experience in the application of principles and techniques to various areas of public service.
Prerequisite: INTL 400
View Book Information

INTL 480  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: This course serves as a capstone class for students completing the Intelligence Studies program. It requires students to integrate and apply knowledge gained from the overall program curriculum. As part of the Senior Seminar, the students will research, write and present the findings and results of a topic that has significance to the profession of Intelligence Studies.
Prerequisite: INTL 400
View Book Information

INTL 490  (3-3-0)  Advanced Readings and Research: This course allows students to conduct intensive, independent research studies of selected topics. The student will research, write and present the findings and results of the research.
Prerequisite: INTL 400
View Book Information

MATH 120  (3-3-0)  Finite Mathematics: An introduction to mathematical sets, logic, probability, statistics, and the metric system.
View Book Information

MATH 121  (3-3-0)  or (4-3-2) Introduction to College Algebra: This course provides a foundation in algebraic concepts and problem solving skills for students who are preparing to take college algebra or precalculus I. Topics include arithmetic of real numbers, simplifying expressions (polynomial, rational, radical, etc.), and solving equations and inequalities (linear, quadratic, radical, etc.). When taken for 4 credits, two lab hours are included.
View Book Information

MATH 123  (3-3-0)  or (4-3-2) College Algebra: An algebra course containing the following topics: sets, the real number system, exponents, radicals, polynomials, equations, inequalities, relations and functions, graphing, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, complex numbers, mathematical induction, and the binomial theorem. A graphing calculator is required. When taken for 4 credits, two hours of lab are included.
Prerequisite: MATH 121 Or High School Algebra I, II, And Plane Geometry Or equivalent, And satisfactory profile examination score.
View Book Information

MATH 124  (3-3-0)  College Trigonometry: A trigonometry course containing the following topics: trigonometric functions defined on angles, circular functions, graphs, inverse trigonometric functions, identities, trigonometric equations, law of cosines, law of sines, and complex numbers. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or High School Algebra I, II, And Plane Geometry Or equivalent, And satisfactory profile examination score.
View Book Information

MATH 126  (3-3-0)  or (4-3-2) Quantitative Reasoning: This is a basic quantitative reasoning course with emphasis on concepts and applications of mathematical and statistical methods. This activity based quantitative reasoning course introduces students to basic mathematics, probability and risk, summarizing and analyzing data, regression and correlation, geometric modeling, and financial mathematics. Spreadsheets and course specific software will be used to deepen understanding of these concepts and increase student engagement with the course material. When taken for 4 credits, two lab hours are included.
Prerequisite: MATH 121 Or High School Algebra I, II, And Plane Geometry Or equivalent, And satisfactory profile examination score.
View Book Information

MATH 129  (3-3-0)  or (4-3-2) Precalculus Mathematics I: This course is the first of a two-semester sequence that provides a background for students who are preparing to take calculus. Topics include sets, the real number system, exponents, radicals, polynomials, equations, inequalities, functions, relations, graphing, conic sections, and rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A graphing calculator is required. When taken for four credits, two hours of lab are included.
Prerequisite: High School Algebra I, II, And Plane Geometry Or equivalent, And satisfactory profile examination score.
View Book Information

MATH 130  (3-3-0)  or (4-3-2) Precalculus Mathematics II: This course is the second of a two-semester sequence that provides the background for students who are preparing to take calculus. Topics include graphing, systems of equations, matrices, complex numbers, mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, sequences and series, polar coordinates, parametric equations, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, and trigonometric identities. A graphing calculator is required. When taken for four credits, two hours of lab are included.
Prerequisite: MATH 129
View Book Information

MATH 131  (3-3-0)  or (4-3-2) Algebra and Trigonometry: An in-depth study of the topics covered in MATH 129 and MATH 130. A graphing calculator is required. When taken for four credits, two hours of lab are included.
Prerequisite: High School Algebra I, II, And Plane Geometry Or equivalent, And satisfactory profile examination score.
View Book Information

MATH 140  (4-4-0)  Applied Calculus: A course in calculus applicable to business and the social sciences incorporating a review of college algebra and studies of linear equations, functions and their limits, derivations, applications of derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integrals and applications, and numerical techniques and applications.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 129
View Book Information

MATH 142  (4-3-2)  Calculus with Analytic Geometry I: The first course of a three-semester sequence in calculus with analytic geometry, including studies of graphs, functions, limits, differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, and applications of the definite integral.
Prerequisite: (MATH 129 And MATH 130) Or MATH 131
View Book Information

MATH 150  (3-3-0)  Discrete Mathematics I: The first course of a two-semester sequence in discrete mathematics, providing the theoretical base and support for computer science and including operations on sets; Cartesian products and tuples; combinatorial objects; Venn diagrams; event spaces and basic probability; number systems; the statement calculus; rules of inference and validity of arguments; inductive proofs; the concept of an algorithm; equivalence relations; partial ordering relations; graphs and digraphs as relations, including trees and shortest paths in digraphs; basic definitions and notations of functions; and recurrences for the analysis of algorithms.
Prerequisite: (MATH 129 And MATH 130) Or MATH 131
View Book Information

MATH 241  (4-3-2)  Calculus with Analytic Geometry II: The second course of a three-semester sequence in calculus with analytic geometry, including studies of the notion of integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integration, differential equations, infinite series and tests of convergence, power series, and Taylor series.
Prerequisite: MATH 142
View Book Information

MATH 242  (4-3-2)  Calculus with Analytic Geometry III: The third course of a three-semester sequence in calculus with analytic geometry, including studies of vectors, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, directional derivatives, maxima and minima, multiple integrals and applications, line and surface integrals, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Divergence Theorem.
Prerequisite: MATH 241
View Book Information

MATH 250  (3-3-0)  Discrete Mathematics II: A continuation of MATH 150, including an introduction to graph theory, graph algorithms, representations of graphs, planar graphs, graph algorithms, minimal spanning trees, tree traversals, decision trees, game trees, network models, max flow min cut theorem, matching, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits and applications, automata, grammars and languages, the closest-pair problem, and convex hull.
Prerequisite: MATH 150
View Book Information

MATH 251  (3-3-0)  Linear Algebra: This course provides a study of topics including vectors, matrices, matrix operations, the system of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, determinants, vector spaces and subspaces, linear independence, bases, linear transformations, rank and kernel, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products, Euclidean spaces, and the Gram-Schmidt process.
Prerequisite: MATH 130 Or MATH 131
View Book Information

MATH 260  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Mathematics: A course designed to help students transition to upper level courses in mathematics. Topics include set theory, logic, proof techniques, induction, equivalence relations, functions and cardinality, countable and uncountable sets, and sequences.
Prerequisite: MATH 142 And MATH 150
View Book Information

MATH 262  (3-3-0)  Modern Geometry: This course in modern geometry focuses on axiomatic methods and proofs. Topics from Euclidean geometry include lines, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, congruent and similar triangles, circles, polygons, areas, and volumes. Some topics from non-Euclidean geometry are also included.
Prerequisite: (MATH 129 And MATH 130) Or MATH 131
View Book Information

MATH 312  (3-3-0)  History of Mathematics: A survey of mathematics incorporating biographical accounts of persons who have contributed significantly to the development of mathematics, descriptions of their achievements, and discussions of other major topics of interest in mathematics.
Prerequisite: MATH 142
View Book Information

MATH 315  (3-3-0)  Applied Cryptography: This course is an introduction to classical and modern cryptography. We apply elementary number theory to the problems of cryptography. Topics include classical cryptosystems, basic number theory, the data encryption standards, the RSA algorithm, discrete logarithms, Hash functions, digital signatures, digital cash, secret sharing schemes, and the zero knowledge techniques. A computer algebra system will be used.
Prerequisite: MATH 150
View Book Information

MATH 320  (3-3-0)  Difference Equations: An introductory course in difference equations and discrete dynamical systems including studies of difference calculus, first order difference equations, higher order linear difference equations, basic theory of linear systems of difference equations, linear periodic systems, stability theory, Liapunov's second method, Z-transform, asymptotic behavior of solutions.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 And MATH 251
View Book Information

MATH 325  (3-3-0)  Discrete Optimization: A course including such topics as maximization and minimization problems in graphs and networks, matching theory, (shortest paths, minimum spanning trees, maximum flows, minimum cost flows); transportation and trans-shipment problems, NP-completeness.
Prerequisite: MATH 150
View Book Information

MATH 331  (3-3-0)  Differential Equations I: The first course of a two-semester sequence in differential equations, emphasizing applications to science and engineering and including the following topics: first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, higher order linear equations, the Laplace Transform, and series solutions of second order linear equations.
Prerequisite: MATH 242
View Book Information

MATH 340  (3-3-0)  Topics in Mathematics: A study of major topics of current interest in mathematics not covered in existing courses.
View Book Information

MATH 345  (3-3-0)  Mathematics of Interest Rates: The course closely follows the financial mathematics syllabus of society of actuaries. The purpose of the course is to develop practical knowledge of the theory of interest in both finite and continuous times, know how these concepts are used in the various annuity functions, and be able to apply the concepts of present and accumulated value for various streams of cash flows as a basis for future use in reserving, valuation, pricing, duration, asset/liability management, investment income, capital budgeting, and contingencies.
Prerequisite: MATH 140 Or MATH 142
View Book Information

MATH 350  (3-3-0)  Mathematics of Financial Markets: This course covers the usage and pricing of derivatives. Subjects include the basis features of futures and options, binomial option pricing, the Black-Scholes formula, interest rate based derivatives, volatility measurement, and dynamic trading strategies. It also covers arbitrage-based derivatives pricing approaches and quantitative analysis.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And STAT 301
View Book Information

MATH 361  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Modern Algebra I: The first course of a two-semester sequence introducing fundamental concepts and proof techniques used in abstract algebra and including studies of groups, normal subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, rings, ideals, quotient rings, integral domains, fields, and related topics.
Prerequisite: MATH 251 And MATH 260
View Book Information

MATH 362  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Modern Algebra II: This course is a continuation of MATH 361 and presents a deeper and more extended study of rings, ring homomorphisms and ideals, factor rings, properties of ideals, integral domains, unique factorization domains, polynomial rings, irreducibility tests, field extensions, algebraic extensions, an introduction to Galois Theory, and related topics.
Prerequisite: MATH 361
View Book Information

MATH 372  (3-3-0)  Linear Programming: A study of methods and applications of optimizing a linear function subject to linear constraints, the theory of the simplex method and duality; parametric linear programs; sensitivity analysis; modeling and computer implementation.
Prerequisite: MATH 251
View Book Information

MATH 380  (3-3-0)  Nonlinear Programming: This course includes methods for unconstrained optimization such as golden section search method, gradient method, Newton's method and conjugate direction method; and methods for constrained optimization, including Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker Theory, and duality.
Prerequisite: MATH 251
View Book Information

MATH 400  (3-3-0)  Diag/Prescript Math: A course examining diagnostic teaching in the context of a general approach to mathematics instruction, with emphasis on strengthening students' knowledge of mathematics and instructional psychology.
View Book Information

MATH 405  (3-3-0)  Principals of Discrete Applied Mathematics: This course is a study of illustrative topics in discrete applied mathematics including sorting algorithms, information theory and data compression, coding theory, secret codes, generating functions, Fourier transforms, linear programming, game theory. There is an emphasis on topics that have direct application in the real world.
Prerequisite: MATH 150 And STAT 202
View Book Information

MATH 410  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Calculus of Variations and Optimal Control: Introduction to calculus of variations and optimal control for dynamical systems; the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, necessary conditions for optimality and computational techniques for solution of the necessary conditions.
Prerequisite: MATH 331
View Book Information

MATH 412  (3-3-0)  Advanced Calculus: A comprehensive and rigorous study of the concepts of limit, continuity, topology on the real line, properties of continuous functions, Mean Value Theorem and Taylor's Formula, and calculus of one variable.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And MATH 260
View Book Information

MATH 415  (3-3-0)  Intro to Wavelets and Data Compression: This course presents the basic principles of wavelets and data compression. Wavelets have had quite a huge impact in the signal processing community, especially with regard to applications like compression (speech, audio, image and video, modeling and restoration). The course will cover topics including: inner products and norms of n-dimensional vectors, orthogonal matrices and block matrix arithmetic, Entropy and Cumulative Energy, peak signal to noise ratio, complex numbers and Euler's formula, Fourier series, convolutions, lowpass/highpass filters, Haar Transformations, Daubechies filters, Gaussian white noise, and the VISUShrink denoising technique. A significant amount of the course is dedicated to programming.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 And MATH 251
View Book Information

MATH 420  (3-3-0)  Mathematical Modeling: This is a multi-disciplinary course that enables students to learn the techniques of mathematical modeling. There will be an overview of differential equations as well as the axioms of modeling and model validation. Topics will be selected from mathematical medicine, Markovian combat models, fractals, computational fluid dynamics, Navier-Stokes equations, and applications in weather forecasting, hydrodynamics, and traffic queuing processes. Computer simulations will be part of the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 251 And MATH 331
View Book Information

MATH 431  (3-3-0)  Differential Equations II: A continuation of MATH 331, including the following topics: numerical methods; nonlinear differential equations and stability; Fourier Series and classical partial differential equations; boundary value problems and the Sturm-Liouville Theory; the system of linear differential equations; and the existence theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 251 And MATH 331
View Book Information

MATH 432  (3-3-0)  Read/Honors in Math: An introduction to methods of research and independent study in mathematics. For seniors and/or honor students.
View Book Information

MATH 433  (3-3-0)  Math Conc/Elem Sch Tch: A course for pre-service and in-service teachers at the intermediate level, emphasizing sets and the set theory, the development of the real number system, measurements, the use of manipulative materials, elements of geometry, computer utilization, and problem solving.
View Book Information

MATH 435  (3-3-0)  Partial Differential Equations with Applications: A course containing the following topics: first order partial differential equations; the wave equation; the diffusion equation; the Laplace equation; d'Alembert's solution; Duhamel's principle; the classification of partial differential equations; elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations; Stability theory; energy conservation; Sturm-Liouville problems; Fourier series; integral transforms; Laplace transforms; Greens's functions; and variational methods. Applications in medicine, engineering, meteorology, and industry will be discussed. Mathematical software such as ACSL, Maple, and Mathematica will be used.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And MATH 331
View Book Information

MATH 440  (3-3-0)  Applied Numerical Methods: A course on numerical methods including topics such as: nonlinear equations, linear systems, interpolation and polynomial approximation, curve fitting numerical differentiation, numerical integration, numerical optimization, solution of differential equations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Mathematical software such as Maple, Matlab, and Mathematica will be used.
Prerequisite: MATH 431
View Book Information

MATH 450  (3-3-0)  Selected Topics in Mathematics: Advanced study of major topics in mathematics from fields such as topology, advanced calculus, complex analysis, or modern algebra. Course may be repeated for credit with approval of department.
View Book Information

MATH 461  (3-3-0)  Theory of Real Variables: A comprehensive and rigorous study of real variable functions including differentiability, the Riemann Integral, sequences of functions, infinite series, the generalized Riemann integral, and an introduction to the Lebesgue Integral.
Prerequisite: MATH 412
View Book Information

MATH 472  (3-3-0)  Theory of Numbers: A study of the elementary properties of integers, invisibility, Euclid's Algorithm, prime numbers, and congruences.
Prerequisite: MATH 260
View Book Information

MATH 481  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Topology: A study of topics in the field of point set topology, including topological and metric spaces and an overview of various topological properties such as separation axioms, countability, compactness, connectedness, continuity, and homeomorphisms.
Prerequisite: MATH 412
View Book Information

MATH 485  (3-3-0)  Teaching Secondary School Mathematics Using Technology I: This course is a comprehensive study of teaching secondary mathematics with technology. The emphasis is placed on algebra, calculus, data analysis, probability, and statistics.
View Book Information

MATH 486  (3-3-0)  Teaching Secondary School Mathematics Using Technology II: This course is a continuation of MATH 485. It provides a comprehensive study of teaching secondary school mathematics using technology, with emphasis on geometry and measurement.
Prerequisite: MATH 485
View Book Information

MATH 492  (3-3-0)  Complex Variables: A rigorous study of elementary functions, differentiation and integration of analytic functions, Taylor and McLaurin series, Residue Theorem, and contour integration.
Prerequisite: MATH 412 Or MATH 461
View Book Information

MATS 160  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Materials Science: This course is an introduction to topics in materials science, including the synthesis, fabrication, structures, properties and applications of materials. It covers various types of materials, such as metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers, and composite materials. Projects will be done using laboratory optical and electron microscopes to study the structure of various samples.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142
View Book Information

MATS 260  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Nanomaterials: This course is an introduction to the rapidly developing field of nanomaterials and their applications. Topics cover nanomaterials properties, fabrication, and characterization. Students will work in small groups to carry out projects on nanomaterial imaging of provided specimens, using electron microscopy and/or atomic force microscopy.
Prerequisite: MATS 160 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122) Or instructor consent
View Book Information

MATS 301  (4-3-2)  Polymer Science: This course covers general concepts about polymeric systems including synthesis, characterization, structure development and bulk properties. Applications of polymers including fibers and composites are also covered.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
View Book Information

MATS 311  (4-2-4)  Scanning Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis: This course provides students with cutting-edge electron microscopy research skills using stateof-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA), to study the structure of diverse material or biological samples. It comprises both theories in the lectures and hands-on trainings in the laboratories. Upon completion of the course, the students are trained to utilize the microscopy skills for independent research.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122)
View Book Information

MATS 321  (3-3-0)  X-Ray Diffraction Analysis: This course provides fundamental knowledge and analyzing skills in X-ray diffraction method. It covers the physics of X-ray generation, characteristics and safety issues; crystal geometry and Bragg diffraction; and various applications of XRD for materials research, including crystal structure determination, precise lattice parameter measurement, qualitative and quantitative phase analyses, crystal size and stress measurement.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122)
View Book Information

MATS 360  (4-3-2)  Introduction to Electronic Materials: This course is an introduction to the fundamental properties of semiconductors used in electronic, optoelectronic, and photovoltaic fields. The emphasis will be on material electronic and optical properties, which are intertwined with crystal structure and chemical composition of such materials. Laboratory activities will be carried out in the form of problem-solving through computer simulations of material properties, as well as material electric and optical characterization. Students will have hands-on measurements of resistivity of silicon, photoconductivity, and quantum efficiency spectroscopy of optical-electron conversion in solar cells and optical sensors.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122)
View Book Information

MATS 460  (4-3-2)  Electronic Materials and Processing: This is an in-depth course that focuses on electronic and optoelectronic materials. It discusses the materials science of semiconductor processing, with emphasis on elemental (silicon and germanium) and III-V compound (gallium arsenide) semiconductors and related materials. The course includes the thermochemistry of semiconductors, the dynamics of defect formation, and the processing and process control to achieve desired materials properties. The course discusses the principles of design and production of novel materials to obtain electronic devices with superior performances; in essence, the science of how to obtain nanostructured electronic and opto-electronic materials.
Prerequisite: MATS 360
View Book Information

MEDI 200  (2-2-0)  Medical Terminology: A comprehensive study of the language of medicine, including the use of the terms in the various areas of medical science.
View Book Information

MGMT 311  (3-3-0)  Principles of Management: A study of the theory and process of management principles and basic organization behavior. Emphasizes major managerial functions such as planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, as well as the role of the manager in a changing environment. Explains ethical issues, managerial decision making, leadership behaviors, and managing a diverse workforce and provides an introduction to international management.
Prerequisite: ECON 211 Or ECON 212 And ACCT 211
View Book Information

MGMT 325  (3-3-0)  Quantitative Methods for Business: This course provides an introduction to management science topics and modeling in the decision making process. It covers the quantitative tools for managerial decision making and focuses on areas such as linear programming, inventory control, PERT/CPM, simulation, decision analysis, queuing theory. Computer software used for solving these problems.
Prerequisite: BADM 216 And MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 335  (3-3-0)  Operations Management: This course provides an introduction to the process of producing goods and providing services, with class work oriented toward the analysis and solution of practical problems using quantitative techniques. The focus will be on areas, such as, product and production design, operation strategy, project management, quality assurance and international management issues, capacity decisions, plant layout, supply chain management, forecasting, inventory management scheduling, and aggregate planning.
Prerequisite: BADM 216 And MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 340  (3-3-0)  Project Management: A study of the planning and control of IT projects and the control and optimization of time/costs will be discussed. Different models of project control under certainty and uncertainty will be presented.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And BADM 216
View Book Information

MGMT 350  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurship: A study of the creation, growth, or acquisition of business through entrepreneurial efforts, the nature of entrepreneurship process, and organization of growth oriented acquisitions.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311 And FINC 311 And MKTG 311
View Book Information

MGMT 410  (3-3-0)  Human Resource Management: A study of personnel administration, including the objectives, organization, functions and role of personnel management in the operation of business enterprises, with attention to key problems in the area of employee selection, hiring, and placement; training; wage and salary administration; promotion, transfer, and separation; personnel services; and labor relations.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 415  (3-3-0)  HR Staffing and Development: This course provides the student with insight into the theories and techniques of the key Human Resource Management (HRM) functions of employee selection and employee training and development. Selection is viewed as establishing the employment relationship while training is viewed as addressing skip gaps between employees' actual and desired performance. Strategies are explored for measuring job performance requirements in order to effectively recruit, select, and train employees to meet organizational and individual objectives. Legal, ethical, and global issues in human resources staffing and development are explored throughout the course. This course covers core material essential for managers and for every HRM professional.
View Book Information

MGMT 420  (3-3-0)  Organizational Behavior: The study of human behavior at the individual, group and organizational level including discussion and case studies related to motivation, perception, job design, group behavior, communication, interpersonal conflict, ethics, performance, motivation, and leadership.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 421  (3-3-0)  Quality Management: Quality has become the responsibility of everyone and has been applied by manufacturer and services alike to achieve competitive advantage. This course examines the concept of quality and develops skills in the use of quality tools. Primary focus will be on the management of quality by all the disciplines in an integrated manner within the organization, statistical quality control, total quality management, international quality standards, Japanese concepts of quality, and related topics.
Prerequisite: BADM 216 And MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 425  (3-3-0)  International Business Management: A survey of the theoretical and institutional complexities of international business operations, with emphasis on the special knowledge and skills essential to personnel engaged in the planning and administration of business enterprises and governmental organizations with overseas relationships.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 435  (3-3-0)  Group and Interpersonal Dynamics: This course is conducted in a learning group setting where students experience first hand the dynamics that occur in a task-oriented group while reading and learning about the theory of group development. This course should be taken concurrently with MGMT 470 Strategic Management or MIS 330 Systems Analysis or another course where the student is involved in a team project. The class will explore key issues that underlie group life such as inclusion, influence and intimacy. Leadership and how it emerges within the group will be a key aspect of the learning. The course also includes self assessment exercises and feedback from the group that increases students' awareness of their own styles in interacting with others, including influence style, conflict management, decision making style, communicating and listening styles.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311
View Book Information

MGMT 450  (3-3-0)  Small Business Management: The process of managing a small business including planning, marketing, production, finance, organization, personnel, and pragmatic issues in real situations.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311 And FINC 311 And MKTG 311
View Book Information

MGMT 460  (3-3-0)  Corporate Entrepreneurship: This course addresses the emerging practice of corporate entrepreneurship or Intrapreneurship, broadly defined as the application of entrepreneurial capabilities of the development of new venture within an existing firm. Thus, this course will provide insights into the innovation process in corporations and the unique problems and opportunities that managers and corporate entrepreneurs face in translating innovative ideas into successful results, from opportunity recognition to new venture creation.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311 And MKTG 311 And FINC 311
View Book Information

MGMT 470  (3-3-0)  Strategic Management: A capstone course focusing on the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in previous undergraduate business administration courses. Text and lecture will cover external and internal environmental analysis, business and corporate level strategy, industry analysis, functional strategy, implementation, control, and global business. Case analysis and presentation will combine and enhance learning acquired from readings and Internet searches.
Prerequisite: BADM 215 And MGMT 311 And FINC 311 And MKTG 311
View Book Information

MGMT 490  (3-3-0)  Leadership and Communication: This course is intended to develop the leadership and communication skills that students need to be transformational leaders in their professional career. The course covers theories and dimensions of leadership effectiveness. Through various role playing and case analysis activities, the course measures students' leadership competencies in four areas: developing the vision, sharing the goals, gaining support, and delivering success. The course places emphasis on proper leadership communication, interpersonal skills, cultural literacy and cross-cultural leadership communication, conducting meetings, high-performing team leadership, and public speaking. To this end, all students are required to join a chapter of Toastmaster International and participate actively in all meetings during the course of the semester.
Prerequisite: This is a capstone course for an interdisciplinary degree program; senior standing is required
View Book Information

MIS 211  (3-3-0)  Business Software Applications: This course provides a hands-on approach to learning business software applications. Topics in this course include spreadsheet and database software application development, web design, internet search and e-collaboration through white boarding, messaging, and discussion boards. These software environments and tools are extensively used in organizations to analyze situations and solve problems.
View Book Information

MIS 212  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Computer Programming: This course will introduce students to basic concepts of programming using Visual Basic with emphasis on business applications. The topics for the course will include VB programming, computer concepts in relation to management, the use of Integrated Development Environment (IDE), flowcharts, algorithms, decision making, control structures, modules, developing simple forms, writing procedures, using array.
View Book Information

MIS 300  (3-3-0)  Information Systems Theory and Practice: This course provides an understanding of systems and development concepts, information technology, and application software. This course explains how information and technology are used in organizations to enable improvements in business processes, support decision-making, and contribute to the achievement of competitive advantage. The course focuses on topics such as databases, data warehouses, decision-making, SCM, electronic commerce, system acquisition, and ethical issues. MS Office software will be used to demonstrate IT solutions for business situations.
Prerequisite: BADM 214 Or CSC 100
View Book Information

MIS 320  (3-3-0)  Database Management Systems: This course covers information systems design and implementation within a database management system environment. Students will construct a physical system using database software to implement the logical design. Different available software will be discussed.
Prerequisite: MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 321  (3-3-0)  Advanced Database Management: This course will cover more advanced topics in database design concepts and provides additional instruction on multi-sharing databases. It completes the SQL and will introduce the Oracle.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And MIS 320
View Book Information

MIS 322  (3-3-0)  Enterprise Resource Planning: The concepts of integrated information systems and total systems are the main core of this course. Introduction of different software will be a part of this course.
Prerequisite: MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 323  (3-3-0)  Data Warehousing and Data Mining: In this course the concepts of database of databases i.e. the data warehouse will be presented. Different algorithms for data mining will be presented.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And MIS 320
View Book Information

MIS 330  (3-3-0)  System Analysis and Design: This course provides an understanding of the system analysis and development. It introduces different systems development methodologies and explains the SDLC (Systems Development Life Cycle) by leading students through detailed steps of Planning, Analysis, Design and Implementation. It provides the details for all activities for planning and analysis phase and prepares the students for the second course (MIS 331). Computer tools will be used in construction of the systems.
Prerequisite: MGMT 311 And MIS 320
View Book Information

MIS 331  (3-3-0)  Systems Development: This course continues the materials on MIS 330 and concentrates on the last two phases of systems development life cycle i.e. design and implementation. Students will use Visual Basic Application and Microsoft Macros to write codes to enhance the applications. Some concepts of Object Oriented Design will be introduced in this course. CASE Tools will be used to facilitate different tasks on Systems Development Life Cycle
Prerequisite: MIS 430 And CSC 102 And MIS 320 And MIS 330
View Book Information

MIS 332  (3-3-0)  Object-Oriented Programming and Design: This course is about the object oriented technology and modular design of the systems and related programming issues.
Prerequisite: CSC 102 And MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 340  (3-3-0)  Project Management: The concepts of planning and control of projects and mainly the IT projects will be discussed. The control and optimization of time/costs will be discussed. Different models of project control under certainty and uncertainty will be presented.
Prerequisite: BADM 216 And MGMT 311 And BADM 214 And MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 409  (3-3-0)  Web Development: This course introduces Hyper Text Markup (HTML), Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and Java Script languages to build dynamic web pages. Students will learn how to implement web pages with links, images, image maps, forms, multimedia content, and dynamic pop-up windows, scroll messages, and validating forms in web pages.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 with a grade of C or better
View Book Information

MIS 410  (3-3-0)  Supply Chain Management: In supply chain, the suppliers connect to customers through a series of processes e.g. purchasing, production, storage, sales, transportation and distribution. Each of these business processes and business units interface with others by sending outputs and receiving inputs preferably over an electronic supply chain network. Modeling of these units and optimization of flows together with other issues such as human factors, cultural issues, security factors, automation and other related topics will be discussed.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And BADM 216
View Book Information

MIS 411  (3-3-0)  Excel Analytics: This course introduces modeling concepts in the Excel environment. Students will learn how to implement several accounting and financial models using formulas, functions, and tools to manipulate and display information in spreadsheets. Data visualization for trends discovery and dashboard reporting will also be emphasized.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 Or ACCT 300 with a grade of C or better
View Book Information

MIS 412  (3-3-0)  Business Analytics: This course provides an introduction to the field of business analytics, which has been defined as the extensive use of big data, statistical and quantitative analysis, exploratory and predictive models, and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions. Various data visualization techniques using Excel 2013 are discussed. Linear regression model, time series analysis, and forecasting models are addressed in detail. Different data mining techniques such as cluster analysis, association rules, classification, and regression trees are covered in depth using XLMiner or SAS Enterprise Miner. Students actively participate in the delivery of this course through case and project presentations.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 Or ACCT 300 with a grade of C or better
View Book Information

MIS 415  (3-3-0)  Social Media and the Digital Economy: This course is an introduction to social media (and related tools) and explores its impacts on the business world. Students will understand how social media is used and learn about current web technologies, strategies for integrating web-enabled capabilities in the enterprise, and their impact on consumers. Students will apply their knowledge of social media technologies by creating, managing, promoting, and extending web content and applications.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 with a grade of C or better
View Book Information

MIS 420  (3-3-0)  Management Support Systems: This course will focus on decision making processes under semi-structured situations. Different theories and practices related to decision theory will be covered using several teaching methodologies. Databases, user interfaces, knowledge bases, and modeling concepts will be discussed and students will learn several tools for aiding decision makers in various phases of decision making. Students will be introduced to business intelligence technologies that support business analytics and will learn how to implement data mining model(s) for prediction. Decision modeling software will be used to demonstrate model implementations
Prerequisite: MGMT 325 And MIS 320
View Book Information

MIS 421  (3-0-3)  Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems: The concepts of using machines to imitate human behavior and transferring human knowledge and know how of humans to machines are the main themes of this course. Different models, algorithms and software will be discussed.
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And BADM 216
View Book Information

MIS 430  (3-3-0)  Data Communication and Networking: This course provides an understanding of data communications and networking, including networking and telecommunication technologies, hardware, and software. Special emphasis is placed on the analysis, design, and management of networking applications in organizations.
Prerequisite: MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 435  (3-3-0)  Electronic Commerce: This course introduces emerging online technologies and trends and their influence on the electronic commerce marketplace. Students will learn various revenue models and how to market on the Web, various legal and ethical issues, important security issues, and how to plan for electronic commerce. This course also introduces the current Web design concepts and techniques that will help students develop a real electronic commerce site.
Prerequisite: MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 440  (3-3-0)  New Topics In MIS: Information technology is a very dynamic field that changes very quickly. The new concepts introduced in this area will be presented in this seminar course.
Prerequisite: MIS 300
View Book Information

MIS 450  (3-3-0)  Advanced SQL: This course provides students with advanced SQL skills that allow them to write effective queries against single and multiple tables; manipulate data in tables; create database schema objects; create indices and constraints; alter existing schema objects; create and query external tables; and learn to use the advanced features of SQL in order to query and manipulate data within the database. Students also learn to control privileges at the object and system level and will be able to work with date-time functions available in the Oracle Database. In this course, students use Oracle SQL Developer as the main development tool. SQL*Plus will be introduced as an optional development tool. This course is one of three Oracle certification training courses.
Prerequisite: MIS 321
View Book Information

MIS 451  (3-3-0)  Programming with Advanced PL/SQL: This course covers advanced PL/SQL concepts. Students learn to create PL/SQL blocks of application code that can be shared by multiple forms; create reports and data management applications; create anonymous PL/SQL blocks; work with stored procedures and functions; declare variables; trap exceptions; and declare and control cursors. In addition, students learn to develop, execute, and manage PL\SQL stored program units such as procedures, functions, packages, and database triggers. They also learn to manage object dependencies and the recompilation of invalid objects. This course also describes the characteristics and techniques of the manipulation of large objects. Students are introduced to the uses of some of the Oracle-supplied packages. This is one of three Oracle certification training courses.
Prerequisite: MIS 321 and MIS 450
View Book Information

MIS 452  (3-3-0)  Advanced Database Design and Development: The objective of this course is to provide students with the practical database experience necessary for the successful completion of the Oracle PL/SQL Developer Certified Associate Exam. Students will be required to design a database for a business situation, create and manage all objects necessary for implementation, and perform various maintenance operations on that database. This is one of three Oracle certification training courses.
Prerequisite: MIS 321 and MIS 450
View Book Information

MIS 455  (3-3-0)  Business Modeling and Simulation: This is an elective course for MIS majors and for business majors who are interested in learning the process of modeling business situations and developing model applications using popular Excel add-ins such as: Solver optimization, Crystal ball for forecasting, RiskAmp Monte Carlo simulation, TreePlan for decision analysis, and @Risk for risk analysis. This course combines tangible applications in Finance, Marketing and Operations with a modeling philosophy of learning by doing
Prerequisite: MIS 300 And BADM 216 And MGMT 325 And MGMT 325
View Book Information

MIS 498  (3-3-0)  Information Systems Internship: This course involves the application of quantitative and systems skills developed in the academic environment to problems in a real-world operating environment. The participant will receive practical training and experience under the guidance of the staff of a local business or government organization and a faculty supervisor. Available internships are filled on a competitive basis.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of faculty supervisor
View Book Information

MIS 499  (3-3-0)  Management Information Systems Co-Op: MIS Co-op offers students an opportunity to prepare for a career involving the application of information technology by combining academic theory and work experience. Three hours of academic credit are awarded for half-time paid work experience over a 15-week period. The cooperative education staff, the student, the MIS Co-op director, and the employer's co-op supervisor must agree on the employment terms and the learning experience to be gained in a written contract. The academic grade is assigned by the MIS Co-op director based on student reports and reports of the employer's co-op supervisor.
Prerequisite: MIS 300
View Book Information

MKTG 311  (3-3-0)  Principles of Marketing: A study of the principles of marketing; current practices and structures of the market; analyses of marketing functions, institutions, costs, and marketing legislation.
Prerequisite: ACCT 211 And ECON 211 Or ECON 212
View Book Information

MKTG 312  (3-3-0)  Entrepreneurial Marketing: This course clarifies key marketing concepts, methods, and strategic issues relevant for start-up and early-stage entrepreneurs. Topics addressed include: (1) Marketing issues facing entrepreneurs today; (2) Identification and evaluation of marketing opportunities; (3) Achieving competitive advantages given limited marketing resources, and (4) Major marketing/sales tools that are useful in an entrepreneurial setting. This course is cross listed with ENTR 312.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 322  (3-3-0)  Advertising: A study of the principles of advertising, advertising media, and special problems of small business concerns, including appropriations and planning related to the development of advertising and the economic significance of advertising to both the consumer and the advertiser.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 325  (3-3-0)  Personal Selling: An overview of skills and knowledge involved in personal selling. Emphasis on learning the different techniques for developing personal selling presentations, prospecting for customers, managing customer accounts, and the use of IT in the personal selling role. The course is designed for the student to gain a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for sales, especially the interpersonal communication process.
Prerequisite: A "C" or better in MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 330  (3-3-0)  Retailing: A survey of retailing and its role in distribution, focusing on problems of administrative organization, store location, layout, buying, pricing, merchandising, sales promotions, and current trends in retailing.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 331  (3-3-0)  Consumer Behavior: A survey of the theories of consumer behavior, with contributions from the social sciences and their applications to the marketing discipline.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 333  (3-3-0)  Digital Marketing Media: This course focuses on understanding digital media and will examine the strategic use of digital media platforms and tools for developing and implementing effective marketing strategies. Students will obtain hands-on experience with creating, executing, and managing a digital media marketing plan. Students will be assigned individual and team projects to emphasize learning.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 412  (3-3-0)  Sales Management: A study of the functions of a sales department within the marketing organization, including the recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, supervising, compensating, and evaluating sales personnel.
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 421  (3-3-0)  International Marketing: A survey of the structure, techniques, problems, and general environment of marketing abroad, including the organization, promotion, financing, legal aspects, and operations of the multinational corporation
Prerequisite: MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 460  (3-3-0)  Marketing Research: The application of scientific methods of obtaining information to structuring marketing policies and techniques, with emphasis on the role of research in the solution of marketing problems.
Prerequisite: BADM 216 And MKTG 311
View Book Information

MKTG 470  (3-3-0)  Marketing Management: A study of the organization and coordination of the total marketing program, including marketing segmentation, the marketing mix, and the operating environment. Students analyze firm's marketing strategies, competitive strategies, and industry trends, and conduct an external situational analysis for the development of future oriented strategies and tactics to direct a company's marketing efforts.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Marketing
View Book Information

MKTG 490  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Marketing: A capstone course for seniors in marketing, with course content and activities centering on special topics that may include management or marketing activities, special research topics, or other marketing issues relevant to the business environment.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Marketing
View Book Information

MSCI 101  (1-1-0)  Military Organizations: Introduction of time management for students transitioning to college. An overview of the U. S. Army concentrating on the historical development of ROTC and related customs, courtesies, and traditions of uniformed service. Laboratory periods concentrate on leadership development, physical training, and selected presentations. Fall.
View Book Information

MSCI 102  (1-1-0)  Basic Leadership and Management: An introductory course in leadership and management using case and situational studies to emphasize individual and group needs, group dynamics, and the decision making process. Laboratory periods concentrate on leadership development, physical training, and selected presentations. Spring.
View Book Information

MSCI 201  (3-3-0)  Studies in Decision Making: A study in progressive leadership concentrating on leadership models, personality, and perceptual process. Contemporary and historical leadership problems (case studies) are analyzed from a leader's perspective. Laboratory periods concentrate on leadership development, physical training, and selected presentations. Fall.
View Book Information

MSCI 202  (3-3-0)  Land Navigation and Tactics: An introductory course in land navigation and rifle squad organization, capabilities, and tactics. Laboratory periods concentrate on leadership development, physical training, and selected presentations. Spring.
View Book Information

MSCI 221  (3-3-0)  Leader's Training Course: An intensive practical application of leadership and military skills to satisfy basic course
View Book Information

MSCI 301  (3-3-0)  Unit Level Command Response: A study in leadership from the perspective of the Second Lieutenant, concentrating on the coordination and execution of administrative and tactical command decisions. Laboratory periods concentrate on leadership development, physical training, and selected presentations. Fall.
View Book Information

MSCI 302  (3-3-0)  Terrain Analysis: An integrated course of academics and military skills combining advanced land navigation with squad-level tactics. Laboratory periods concentrate on leadership development, physical training, and selected presentations. Spring
View Book Information

MSCI 321  (3-3-0)  Applied Military Leadership: An intensive practical application of leadership and military skills for Advanced Course students. Five-week summer program conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington for all Advanced Course cadets from colleges and universities throughout the United States. Summer.
View Book Information

MSCI 401  (3-3-0)  Basic Officer Course Prep: Studies in military subjects which will prepare an individual for those duties and responsibilities of a newly commissioned officer. These subjects include Military Leadership, Small Unit Administration, Human Self-Development, Leadership Aspects of Contemporary Issues, Unit Readiness, Company Administration, Effective Written Communications, Awards and Decorations, and Fundamentals of Management. Fall.
View Book Information

MSCI 402  (3-3-0)  Advanced Leadership and Management: Studies in Military Staff organization and procedures to include topics essential to newly commissioned officers. These subjects are: Customs and Traditions of the Service, Ethics and Professionalism, Written and Oral Communications, Personnel and Training Management, Military Justice, Law of War, International Law, U.S. Army Logistics, Maintenance Management, and Soviet Army Indoctrination. Students prepare and present military science instruction to military science classes. Spring.
View Book Information

MSCI 421  (1-0-3)  Physical Education and Training: This course is designed to introduce the student to physical fitness and the regulatory components of the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Information on various topics contributing to a fit lifestyle (such as nutrition and hydration, the benefits of aerobic and anaerobic exercise, running selection, etc.) will be interwoven throughout the course. The course will involve calisthenics, introduction to various sports, swimming, weight lifting, running, and road marching.
Prerequisite: MSCI 301 Or MSCI 302
View Book Information

MSCI 422  (1-0-3)  Physical Education and Training: This course is designed to sustain the student's physical fitness in accordance with the regulatory components of the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Information on various topics contributing to an above average fitness level (muscular strengthening and endurance, nutrition and hydration, the benefits of total body fitness, distance running/road marching techniques, etc.) will be interwoven throughout the course. The course will involve calisthenics, negotiation of obstacle courses advanced water survival, leadership/ confidence building exercises, preparation and execution of lesson plans, organization and execution of physical fitness training administration of APFT, and evaluation techniques.
View Book Information

MSCI 423  (1-0-3)  Physical Education II: This course is designed to introduce the student ot physical fitness and the regulatory components of the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Information on various topics contributing to an above average fitness level (muscular strengthening and endurance, nutrition and hydration, benefits of total body fitness, distance running/road marching techniques, etc.) will be interwoven throughout the course. The course will involve calisthenics, negotiation of obstacle courses, advance water survival, leadership/confidence building exercises, preparation and execution of lesson plans, organization and execution of physical fitness training, administration of APFT and evaluation techniques.
View Book Information

MUSI 100  (3-3-0)  Basic Musicianship: A study of the rudiments of music, including basic rhythmic and pitch notation; major and minor scales; intervals; primary triads; rhythmic drills; and sight singing and ear training activities. Also includes keyboard and computer applications of concepts studied. Must complete and/or test out to be admitted as a music major.
View Book Information

MUSI 101  (2-2-0)  Class Piano for Non-Majors: A laboratory-style course designed for the non-music major giving the student a basic understanding of music reading, keyboard harmony, and technique.
View Book Information

MUSI 102  (1-1-0)  Basic Piano Skills: A class piano course giving the non-piano major a basic understanding of keyboard harmony and technique, with the first year of instruction devoted to practicing the five-finger major hand positions, memorizing several short compositions, sight reading, and combining staccato and legato playing. Must complete and/or test out to be admitted as a music major.
View Book Information

MUSI 110  (1-1-0)  Choir: A course focusing on selections from all periods and styles of music, including pop, spiritual, and gospel music, with a study of vocal techniques, choral diction, and performance styles and practice. Includes choral performances at various University and community activities, with tours planned to many areas in North Carolina and other states. Open to all students who enjoy singing.
View Book Information

MUSI 111  (1-1-0)  Chamber Ensemble: This course gives students the opportunity to engage more actively in the music-making process through participation in a chamber ensemble, which is defined as a small group of musicians (normally two to eight people) performing music without a director/ conductor.
View Book Information

MUSI 115  (1-1-0)  Percussion Ensemble: This course offers the student percussionist practical experience in the playing of percussion instruments in a chamber music setting. This course will explore traditional, contemporary, and world music for percussion ensemble. Open to all students following audition and permission of the instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 118  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Music Tech I: This course will enable students to develop facility with a range of music technology hardware; and software, and learn procedures for operating those elements. This course will feature uses of technology in K-12 music education settings. Various methods and software applications available for use in public schools as well as their relative merits will be investigated. Additionally, this course provides a foundation for students to develop their creative capacities. Course topics will include student-based performance (sequences, warm-ups, accompaniment, transposition, scoring), composition (sequencing, arranging, scoring), administrative functions (grading, communications, research, databases, financial management), logistics (lab set-up, funding), and resources. Students should have previous experience with Windows or Mac interfaces and familiarity with the internet.
Prerequisite: MUSI 100
View Book Information

MUSI 120  (1-1-0)  Brass Ensemble: A course in the performance of small ensemble compositions written for various combinations of brass and wind instruments. Open to all students following audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 125  (1-0-2)  Trumpet Choir: A course in the performance of small ensemble compositions written for trumpet choir. Open to trumpet students following audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 130  (1-1-0)  Woodwind Ensemble: A course in the performance of small ensemble compositions written for various combinations of woodwind instruments. Open to all students following audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 140  (1-1-0)  Jazz Ensemble: A major performing organization of the university, with practice including instruction in improvisation and arranging, and with a varied repertoire that includes music from jazz to fusion and popular styles. Open to all students following audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 150  (1-1-0)  Opera Workshops: Study and performance of scenes, acts, and/or operas from both the standard repertoire and operas of primarily historical interest. Open to all students. Audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 152  (3-3-1)  Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training I: A study of the basic elements of harmony: primary and secondary triads in root position and all inversions; seventh chords; major, minor, and chromatic scales; introduction to part-writing procedures; rhythmic drills; and sight singing and ear training activities. Includes keyboard and computer applications of concepts studied.
Prerequisite: MUSI 100
View Book Information

MUSI 155  (2-3-0)  Exploration in Music Education: An introduction to teaching music in the public schools required of all music education majors. Students are introduced to the K-12 National Music Standards, NC Standard Course of Study, and North Carolina licensing procedures. Through reading, writing, field experiences, and discussions, students consider the implications of a particular philosophy of music education, various styles of teaching/learning, and music knowledge and skills, as well as dispositions necessary to become an excellent music teacher. Issues related to music assessment, classroom management, and different types of school settings are considered.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 159  (3-3-0)  Beginning Jazz Improvisation: A user-friendly course of study in the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic practices associated with the art of jazz improvisation, including the theoretical background associated with it and the stylistic and idiomatic considerations as well. Students learn through a “hands-on” approach; they are called upon to improvise jazz in actual playing situations on a weekly basis. Students also learn through the study of jazz harmony and theory and through analysis of classic jazz recordings made famous by the masters of the craft.
View Book Information

MUSI 160  (1-1-0)  Orchestra: A course in the performance of small ensemble compositions written for various combinations of string instruments. Open to all students following audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 165  (0-1-0)  Music Seminar/ Recital Hour: A series of weekly workshops, clinics, master classes, presentations, and performances presented to students taking applied lessons and senior recital. Students gain practical performance experience during the scheduled music seminar/ recital hours. Students are required to attend additional student ensemble, senior recital, and Fine Arts Series events. Concurrent registration in applied lessons or senior recital is required with MUSI 165 registration. Course taken for Pass/ Fail credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 167  (1-1-0)  Applied Brass: A sequence of courses focusing on diagnoses and recommendations for proper brass/wind playing habits, with emphasis on embouchure development, tonal studies, scales, and arpeggios. Minimum of five hours practice per week required. Freshman year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 169  (1-1-0)  Applied Organ: A sequenced study of organ manual and pedal techniques, with practice works including easy preludes and offertories, studies by Gelason, Nilsen, etc.; Bach's Little Preludes and Fugues; and hymn playing and service playing. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. Freshman year sequence.
View Book Information

MUSI 171  (1-1-0)  Applied Piano: A first-year sequence of courses in piano devoted to acquiring a firm technical foundation through the use of various drills and exercises, with beginning repertoire including pieces on the level of the Clementi Sonatinas, Op. 36, the Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach, and Bach's Two-part Inventions. Includes practice with major and minor scales played in contrary and parallel motion. Freshman year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit
View Book Information

MUSI 173  (1-1-0)  Applied Percussion: A sequence of courses for the percussionist focusing on basic technique, sound production, exercises and etudes with emphasis on indefinite pitch and related instruments, keyboard percussion, and timpani. Freshman year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 175  (1-1-0)  Applied Strings: A sequence of courses featuring diagnoses and recommendations for proper string playing habits, with practice emphasis on bowing and fingering methods, positions, scales, arpeggios, tone, and vibrato. Freshman year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 177  (1-1-0)  Applied Voice: A sequence of courses in voice focusing on the study of vowels and the fundamentals of tone production, correct breathing and posture, and the performance of early secular and sacred songs. Freshman year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 179  (1-1-0)  Applied Woodwinds: A sequence of courses focusing on diagnoses and recommendations for proper woodwind playing habits, with emphasis on embouchure development, tonal studies, scales, and arpeggios. Freshman year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 191  (1-0-5)  Marching Band: A major performing organization of the university, playing in parades, at miscellaneous events, and at football games both at home and in other states. Open to all students following audition and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 192  (1-0-5)  Concert Band: A major performing organization of the university, playing varied styles and genres of music in concerts, both locally and in other cities. Open to all students following audition and permission of the instructor.
View Book Information

MUSI 193  (1-0-2)  Pep Band: The FSU Pep Band is an important performing organization of the university, playing recruitment concerts at high schools, official university functions, as well as home and selected away basketball games. This 1-credit course is open to all students following audition and instructor permission. Preference is given to those who have performed with the FSU marching band in the fall semester. This course can be repeated for credit. This course cannot be used for an ensemble credit requirement by music majors/ minors.
View Book Information

MUSI 201  (1-1-0)  Piano Skills I: A course giving the non-piano major a basic understanding of keyboard harmony and technique, with the first year of instruction devoted to practicing the five-finger major hand positions, memorizing several short compositions, sight reading, and combining staccato and legato playing.
Prerequisite: MUSI 102
View Book Information

MUSI 202  (1-1-0)  Piano Skills II: A study of primary chords in all keys, the major and minor harmonic scales and major and minor arpeggios in two octaves; four-part chordal textures; and sight reading using chord symbols.
Prerequisite: MUSI 201
View Book Information

MUSI 210  (3-3-0)  Music Appreciation: An introduction to the basic materials and ideas of music, stressing the relationship of music to society, culture, and philosophy; introducing musical instruments and the contributions of important composers; and studying characteristics of style and form in various types of music. Recital attendance required.
View Book Information

MUSI 218  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Music Technology II: This course develops student proficiency in MIDI sequencing and in the use and integration of music notation, digital audio, and digital video software. Students will design multimedia projects, study electronic recording equipment, and construct music projects and interactive lessons appropriate for k-12 music instruction. Students will integrate digital multimedia files into presentations, music lessons, and class projects. This course will center on intermediate level competence in music technology. The recording studio, music instruction, and music notation are the global objectives for this course.
Prerequisite: MUSI 118
View Book Information

MUSI 225  (3-3-0)  A History of Jazz in American Culture: Using both a socio-cultural and historical perspective, this course explores the major forms of African-American folk music indigenous to the United States. These forms of African American folk music (ragtime, blues, and gospel) contain elements of musical expression rooted in the aesthetic make-up of jazz. Students will explore and analyze the development of jazz music in relation to its cultural context.
View Book Information

MUSI 241  (1-1-0)  Class Strings: A study of the basic concepts of playing and teaching the bowed string instruments, focusing on basic performance skills on each of the instruments (violin, viola, violoncello, and double bass), as well as on information about techniques for organizing, recruiting, and teaching string classes and orchestras in the public schools.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 242  (1-1-0)  Class Woodwinds: A practical introduction to the woodwind family, with emphasis on techniques for playing the flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, and saxophone, as well as on the characteristics and functions of each woodwind instrument and on the basic skills needed to offer instruction on woodwind instruments in the public schools.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 251  (1-1-0)  Class Voice I: A course featuring group instruction in the fundamentals of singing, with emphasis on breath control, posture, and tone production, and with additional attention to developing a beginning vocal repertoire. Course intended for music education majors with instrumental and/or keyboard concentrations only.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 252  (1-1-0)  Class Voice II: A continuation of techniques started in MUSI 251, including new material such as basic diction, consonant and vowel production, and the extension of vocal and dynamic range through exercises and repertoire. Course intended for music education majors with voice concentration only.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 260  (3-3-0)  African-American Music: A study of traditional African music and its interaction with western musical styles, with emphasis on the development of the blues, spirituals, gospel music, jazz idioms, and more recent African-American styles, and with attention to the work of major black composers and performers in both the concert and commercial areas.
View Book Information

MUSI 262  (1-1-0)  Diction: A study of the enunciation, pronunciation, and articulation of languages applicable to performances of vocal literature written in English, French, Italian, German, and Latin.
View Book Information

MUSI 267  (1-1-0)  Applied Brass: A sequence of courses for the brass player focusing on the continuing development of playing habits, with an emphasis on embouchure development, technique development and solo literature. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 167
View Book Information

MUSI 269  (1-1-0)  Applied Organ: A sequence of courses in organ technique and repertoire, including the Bach's Little Preludes and Fugues and Orgelbuchlein; Brahms's Choral Preludes; works by Vierne and Widor; hymns; and other standard works. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required.
Prerequisite: MUSI 180 And MUSI 169
View Book Information

MUSI 271  (1-1-0)  Applied Piano: A sequence of courses in piano technique and repertoire on the level of Beethoven's Sonatas Op. 49, Nos. 1, 2; Bach's Two and Three-part Inventions; Chopin's Mazurkas, and Waltzes; and Bartok's Mikrokosmos, Volumes III and IV. Included practice with major and minor scales played in contrary and parallel motion. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 171
View Book Information

MUSI 273  (1-1-0)  Applied Percussion: A sequence of courses for the percussionist focusing on intermediate techniques, sound production, exercises, etudes, and solo literature with emphasis on indefinite pitch and related instruments, keyboard percussion, and timpani. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 173
View Book Information

MUSI 275  (1-1-0)  Applied Strings: A sequence of courses in technical studies and the development of a recital repertoire for strings. Performance in student recitals and a minimum of ten hours practice per week required. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 175
View Book Information

MUSI 277  (1-1-0)  Applied Voice: A continuation of studies in tone production and other principles of singing, with emphasis on various vocalists and on English, Italian, and French songs. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
View Book Information

MUSI 279  (1-1-0)  Applied Woodwinds: A sequence of courses in technical studies and the development of a recital repertoire for woodwinds. Performance in student recitals and a minimum ten hours practice per week required. Sophomore year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 179
View Book Information

MUSI 281  (3-3-1)  Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training II: Further study of harmonic elements with emphasis on analysis of primary and secondary triads, seventh chords, and cadences in the content of compositions representing the major historical style periods. Introduction to small forms, nonharmonic tones and melody harmonization. Continuation of part-writing principles, sight singing, ear training, keyboard activities, and computer application of concepts studied.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 285  (3-3-0)  World Music Cultures: A survey of predominantly non-western traditional musical cultures, including ethnic origins of folk and traditional music in the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. This course analyzes the various characteristics of global music culture, including the relationship of music to language, ceremony, and cultural practices such as storytelling and dance. The course is open to all students, and no prior knowledge of music is necessary. Students will listen to musical selections, attend selected events, and write essays about these experiences.
View Book Information

MUSI 292  (3-3-1)  Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training III: Further study of harmonic materials of previous theory courses, including nonharmonic tones, principles of harmonic progression, and part-writing procedures involving more complex harmonies. Introduction of secondary dominants, elementary modulation, and small forms such as phrases, periods, and phrase groups. Creative work, keyboard harmony, sight singing, ear training, analysis, and computer assignments will provide opportunities for application of theoretical concepts studied
Prerequisite: MUSI 281
View Book Information

MUSI 341  (1-1-0)  Class Brass: A study of basic concepts, techniques, and information related to offering instruction on the brass instruments - trumpet, French horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba - in the public schools.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 342  (1-1-0)  Class Percussion: A study of basic concepts, techniques, and information related to offering instruction in total percussion, including snare drum, keyboard percussion, timpani, accessory percussion, drum set, world percussion, and electronic percussion in the public schools.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 350  (3-3-0)  Band Pedagogy: This course is design to provide the students the fundamentals and techniques of how a band works administratively and pedagogically.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 351  (3-3-0)  Music History I: A survey of the development of music from antiquity through the seventeenth century.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 352  (3-3-0)  Music History II: A survey of the development of music from the culmination of the Baroque era in the early eighteenth century to the present day, with emphasis on performance practices and on works of major composers of the late Baroque and Rococo periods; the Viennese Classical School; the Romantic, Post-Romantic, and Impressionist periods; and the twentieth century.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 354  (2-2-0)  Form And Analysis: A study of standard musical forms and structures and the principles upon which they are organized. The course aims to sensitize students to the musical events, including cadences, changes in tonality, meter, texture, and timbre, etc. that indicate important points in a composition's design.
Prerequisite: MUSI 352 And MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 360  (3-3-0)  Trumpet Pedagogy I: The development of advanced skills in pedagogy for teaching trumpet. The course will emphasize solo and orchestral literature for trumpet.
Prerequisite: MUSI 341 and/or two semesters of MUSI 267
View Book Information

MUSI 367  (1-1-0)  Applied Brass: A sequence of courses for the brass player focusing on the continuing development of playing habits, with an emphasis on embouchure development, technique development and recital repertoire. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 267 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 369  (1-1-0)  Applied Organ: A sequence of advanced courses in organ literature, including works of Bach, Buxtehude, Handel, Mendelssohn, Franck, Widor, etc., and incorporating elements of church service playing, hymn playing, and anthem accompaniment, as well as orders of liturgical services and other special services. Performance from memory. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required.
Prerequisite: MUSI 280 And MUSI 269 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 370  (3-3-0)  Percussion Pedagogy I: The development of advanced skills in pedagogy for teaching percussion. The course emphasizes solo and orchestral literature for the snare drum (rudimental and concert), keyboard percussion (two and four mallet), Timpani, and Accessory Percussion.
Prerequisite: MUSI 342 and/or two semesters of MUSI 273
View Book Information

MUSI 371  (1-1-0)  Applied Piano: A continuation of technical piano studies, focusing on compositional form and performance style in works from the various historical periods, including the Bach's Preludes and Fugues from the Well-Tempered Clavier; Haydn's Sonatas; Chopin's Nocturnes; Brahms' Intermezzos; and Bartok's Mikrokosmos, Vol. V, or Sonatina. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 271 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 373  (1-1-0)  Applied Percussion: A sequence of courses in technical studies and recital repertoire development for percussion instruments, especially the marimba and the tympani. Performance in student recitals and a minimum of ten hours practice per week required. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 273 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 375  (1-1-0)  Applied Strings: A sequence of courses in technical studies and recital repertoire development for strings. Performance in student recitals and a minimum of ten hours practice per week required. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 275 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 377  (1-1-0)  Applied Voice: A comprehensive study of English, Italian, French, and German songs. This course is intended to help students build a repertoire for the senior recital. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required.
Prerequisite: MUSI 277 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 379  (1-1-0)  Applied Woodwinds: A sequence of courses in technical studies and recital repertoire development for woodwinds. Performance in student recitals and a minimum of ten hours practice per week required. Junior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 279 And Sophomore Qualifying Exam
View Book Information

MUSI 380  (1-1-0)  Applied Brass: A sequence of advanced courses in organ literature, including works of Bach, Buxtehude, Handel, Mendelssohn, Franck, Widor, etc., and incorporating elements of church service playing, hymn playing, and anthem accompaniment, as well as orders of liturgical services and other special services. Performance from memory. Junior year sequence.
View Book Information

MUSI 381  (3-3-1)  Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training IV: A study in advanced harmonic materials, including diminished seventh, Neapolitan sixth, borrowed, and augmented sixth chords, as well as ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords. Introduction to binary, ternary, and composite forms; continuation of part-writing activities, harmonic analysis, sight singing and ear training exercises, keyboard harmony, and computer assignments. Introduction to twentieth-century harmonic practices such as whole tone scales, atonality, serialism, etc.
Prerequisite: MUSI 292
View Book Information

MUSI 391  (1-2-0)  Conducting (Elementary): The development of manual techniques, score studies, and listening skills related to the conducting of instrumental and vocal ensembles.
Prerequisite: MUSI 152
View Book Information

MUSI 394  (1-1-0)  Choral Conducting: A course developing the oral, visual, and aural skills necessary to conduct vocal ensembles, including mixed choirs, female choirs, and male choirs, as well as the skills and proficiency to read scores of compositions such as madrigals, motets, anthems, oratorios, and cantatas.
Prerequisite: MUSI 281 And MUSI 391
View Book Information

MUSI 396  (1-1-0)  Instrumental Conducting: A course developing the aural, visual, and oral skills necessary to conduct instrumental ensembles, including marching bands, concert bands, and jazz ensembles, and to increase proficiency in score reading.
Prerequisite: MUSI 281 And MUSI 391
View Book Information

MUSI 420  (1-1-0)  Choral Literature: A study of choral literature from 1450 through the twentieth century, including such activities as listening to and analyzing works.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 430  (1-1-0)  Keyboard Literature: A survey of music written for solo stringed keyboard instruments from the early Renaissance to the early decades of the twentieth century. Major works of the master composers will be studied and heard, and students will become familiar with the important keyboard genres, which comprise these composers' work.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 431  (2-2-0)  Orchestration: A study of methods and techniques for arranging compositions for band and orchestral ensembles, with special attention to transposition techniques and to basic compositional principles.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 440  (1-1-0)  Woodwind Literature: A study in the listening, analysis, and evaluation of woodwind solo and ensemble music, in the evaluation of materials for technique development, and in the evaluation and selection of musical scores for band and symphonic performances.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 441  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials (Elementary): A study of curriculum, materials, and procedures for music instruction in elementary and intermediate grades.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 460  (3-3-0)  Trumpet Pedagogy II: : The continued development of advanced skills in pedagogy for teaching trumpet. The course emphasizes trumpet ensemble literature and related chamber literature with trumpet.
Prerequisite: MUSI 360
View Book Information

MUSI 462  (2-2-0)  Music Composition: A study in musical composition that includes writing pieces in basic binary and ternary song forms, variations, and sonata-allegro and rondo forms, with emphasis on integrating materials learned in harmony, counterpoint, and orchestration.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 467  (1-1-0)  Applied Brass: Senior recital preparation, with emphasis on the development of advanced techniques for brass performance. Senior recital repertoire approval by instructor and music faculty committee required in second semester course. Senior year sequence. Senior recital preparation, with emphasis on the development of advanced techniques for brass performance. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit. Senior year sequence.
Prerequisite: MUSI 367
View Book Information

MUSI 469  (1-1-0)  Applied Organ: Continued study and practice of repertoire works, with emphasis on larger and more difficult compositions from the general literature and on the satisfactory public performance of a memorized composition in larger form. Senior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required.
Prerequisite: MUSI 380 And MUSI 369
View Book Information

MUSI 470  (3-3-0)  Percussion Pedagogy II: The continued development of advanced skills in pedagogy for teaching percussion. The emphasis will be on the area of percussion ensemble literature and related chamber literature with percussion.
Prerequisite: MUSI 370
View Book Information

MUSI 471  (1-1-0)  Applied Piano: A sequence of courses in piano study to develop and refine performance techniques and to begin preparations and repertoire practice for the senior recital, with selections chosen from such works as Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier (selections); Bach's French Suites; Mozart or Beethoven's Sonatas; Chopin's Preludes or Nocturnes; Bartok's Mikrokosmos, Vol. VI, Allegro Barbara or Suite, Op. 14; or other works. Senior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 371
View Book Information

MUSI 473  (1-1-0)  Applied Percussion: A sequence of courses for the percussionist focusing on senior recital preparation with emphasis on the development of advanced techniques for percussion. Senior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 373
View Book Information

MUSI 475  (1-1-0)  Applied Strings: Senior recital preparation, with emphasis on the development of advanced techniques for strings. Senior recital repertoire approval by instructor required in second semester. Senior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 375
View Book Information

MUSI 477  (1-1-0)  Applied Voice: In-depth studies of vocal techniques and the literature from Baroque to Contemporary periods, with emphasis on preparations for the senior recital. Senior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 377
View Book Information

MUSI 479  (1-1-0)  Applied Woodwinds: Senior recital preparation, with emphasis on the development of advanced techniques for woodwinds. Senior recital repertoire approval by instructor required in second semester. Senior year sequence. MUSI 165 Music Seminar/Recital Hour required. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: MUSI 379
View Book Information

MUSI 491  (2-2-0)  Vocal Literature: A survey of vocal music from the Renaissance to the 20th century, including listening, singing, and analyzing music.
Prerequisite: MUSI 381
View Book Information

MUSI 499  (1-0-1)  Senior Recital: A performance program of at least fifty minutes, consisting of works representing various styles and periods.
Prerequisite: MUSI 351 And MUSI 352 And MUSI 381 And MUSI 400-level of applied courses (instrumental, keyboard, or voice)
View Book Information

NSCI 110  (4-3-2)  Comprehensive Physical Science: The course is designed to present major basic concepts of physics and chemistry with particular emphasis on relevant applications to day to day activities. Lab experiments and class activities will help in developing critical thinking and analytical skills.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

NSCI 120  (4-3-2)  Modern Biology: An introductory course covering basic biological concepts that provides the student with a comprehensive survey of biological sciences. Some important areas which will be investigated are: cell structure and reproduction, energy relationships at the cellular level, genetics, DNA, evolution, ecology, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animal organ systems.
Prerequisite: NSCI 110
View Book Information

NURS 300  (3-3-0)  Transition to Professional Nursing: This course focuses on the role of the professional nurse and provides an overview of the delivery of professional nursing practices and role transition. Advanced theoretical concepts will be examined using the nursing process as a framework.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the RN BSN Nursing program
View Book Information

NURS 310  (3-3-0)  Transcultural Nursing: This course is designed to assist the nurse to expand his/her view of man. Man is defined as functioning, whole unit with integrity and uniqueness who uses symbols to communicate with the environment. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts of culture, belief systems, health and caring, and how these concepts affect the nursing care delivery system.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

NURS 320  (3-2-1)  Health Assessment Across the Life Span: This course prepares the RN to BSN student to conduct comprehensive health assessments. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition, processing and interpretation of data collected from clients of all ages. A physical, psychological, socio-cultural, and spiritual approach is used to assess the client and to incorporate consideration of the client's needs, state of wellness, developmental level, and response to life experiences. The campus laboratory experience consists of practice with clients.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

NURS 321  (3-2-3)  Health Assessment: This course prepares the pre-licensure student to conduct comprehensive health assessments. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition, processing and interpretation of data collected from clients of all ages. A physical, psychological, socio-cultural, and spiritual approach is used to assess the client and to incorporate consideration of the client's needs, state of wellness, developmental level, and response to life experiences.
Prerequisite: Admission to the upper division
View Book Information

NURS 324  (3-3-0)  Pathophysiology: This course prepares the pre-licensure student to approach complex situations systematically. Emphasis will be placed on the integration and application of pathophysiological concepts to the holistic human in time of physical stress. This course utilizes the nursing process as the basis for examining persons with pathologies requiring multiple dimensions of nursing care.
Prerequisite: NURS 321 And NURS 326 And NURS 365
View Book Information

NURS 325  (3-3-0)  Pathophysiology: This course prepares the RN to BSN student to approach complex situations systematically. Emphasis will be placed on the integration and application of pathophysiological concepts to the holistic human in time of physical stress. This course utilizes the nursing process as the basis for examining persons with pathologies requiring multiple dimensions of nursing care.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

NURS 326  (4-2-6)  Concepts Basic to Nursing: Introductory clinical course designed to introduce the student to conceptual threads and skills fundamental to the practice of nursing. The clinical component of the course allows the student to apply fundamental concepts and evidenced based clinical nursing skills to the long term care setting under the supervision of a clinical faculty.
Prerequisite: Admission to the upper division
View Book Information

NURS 330  (3-3-0)  Gerontological Nursing: This course examines the process of aging. Physical, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual aspects of aging are examined within the context of the family and society. Advanced theoretical concepts of aging will be examined using the nursing process.
Prerequisite: NURS 300
View Book Information

NURS 350  (6-6-0)  Adult Health I: This course focuses on theoretical, physiological, and pathological concepts used to address the health care needs of adult and elderly clients. Building on the foundations of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, students will examine the impacts of altered health states and plan nursing care for clients experiencing specific basic health alterations. Topics include the nursing management of patients who are experiencing selected basic health alterations related to fluid, electrolyte, acid-base imbalances, infection, respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, integumentary, sensory, hematological, renal/urinary, endocrine, and altered cell growth disorders.
Prerequisite: NURS 321 And NURS 326 And NURS 365. Co-requisite: NURS 350L And NURS 324
View Book Information

NURS 350L  (3-0-9)  Adult Health I Clinical: This course is the clinical component of NURS 350. Students will have dedicated clinical experiences in peri-operative units, as well as acute and long term care settings. Principles and practices of intravenous therapy are applied to the adult client in this course. Students will also be exposed to clinical laboratory experiences including refinement of psychomotor skills and simulation activities. The clinical course allows the application of nursing skills, knowledge, and critical thinking necessary for safe effective nursing care within a controlled setting.
Prerequisite: NURS 321 And NURS 326 And NURS 365. Co-requisite: NURS 350 And NURS 324
View Book Information

NURS 360  (3-3-0)  Pediatric Nursing: This course explores the physiological alterations of clients with acute and chronic health care needs. Building on the foundations of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, students will examine the impact of and plan nursing care for pediatric clients experiencing acute and/or chronic alterations. Utilizing the nursing process and nursing management, psychosocial and physiological adaptations will be examined in the context of social justice, cultural competence, and equity of health care.
Prerequisite: NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 360L
View Book Information

NURS 360L  (2-0-6)  Pediatric Nursing Clinical: This course is the clinical component of NURS 360. Students will have dedicated clinical experiences in community based and acute pediatric settings. Students will also be exposed to clinical laboratory experiences including refinement of psychomotor skills and simulation activities related to pediatric nursing. The clinical course allows the application of nursing skills, knowledge, and critical thinking necessary for safe effective nursing care of pediatric populations.
Prerequisite: NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 360
View Book Information

NURS 361  (3-3-0)  Obstetrics and Women's Health: This course introduces nursing concepts related to women's health, pregnancy and care of the newborn. The unique needs of reproducing families will be explored. Building on the foundation of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, the student will explore nursing care for women with reproductive concerns as well as nursing care during preconception, perinatal, postpartum, and neonatal periods. Tasks of pregnancy, psychosocial adaptation, biological-behavioral concepts in obstetric nursing care within the context of social justice, cultural competence, and equity will be addressed.
Prerequisite: NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 361L
View Book Information

NURS 361L  (2-0-6)  Obstetrics and Women's Health Clinical: This course is the clinical component of NURS 361. Students will have dedicated clinical experiences in a variety of community and obstetrical settings. Students will also be exposed to clinical laboratory experiences including refinement of psychomotor skills and simulation activities related to obstetric nursing. The clinical course allows the application of nursing skills, knowledge, and critical thinking necessary for safe effective nursing care of women with reproductive issues and obstetric populations.
Prerequisite: NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 361
View Book Information

NURS 365  (3-3-0)  Pharmacological Concepts: Survey of pharmacology and pharmacotherapy in health care. The student will explore pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of different classes of drugs, legal responsibilities, and safe drug administration.
Prerequisite: Admission to the upper division
View Book Information

NURS 400  (3-3-0)  Nursing Research and Theory (RN to BSN): This course is designed for the RN to BSN student and focuses on the cognitive and professional skills of nursing research and theory. The cognitive skills emphasized include critical thinking, problem solving, research critique, and theory utilization in professional nursing practice. The professional skills include valuing research as a basis for professional nursing practice.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 And STAT 202
View Book Information

NURS 401  (2-2-0)  Nursing Research and Theory (Pre-licensure): This course is designed for the pre-licensure student and focuses on the cognitive and professional skills of nursing research and theory. The cognitive skills emphasized include critical thinking, problem solving, research critique, and theory utilization in professional nursing practice. The professional skills include valuing research as a basis for professional nursing practice.
Prerequisite: STAT 202 And NURS 321 And NURS 326
View Book Information

NURS 401S  (1-1-0)  Nursing Research and Theory Seminar: This is a seminar course in which students apply concepts through an evidence based project that focuses on the cognitive and professional skills of nursing research and theory. The cognitive skills emphasized include critical thinking, problem solving, research critique, and theory utilization in professional nursing practice. The professional skills include valuing research as a basis for professional nursing practice.
Prerequisite: STAT 202 And NURS 321 And NURS 326 And NURS 401 (can be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

NURS 405  (3-3-0)  Psychiatric Nursing: This course introduces nursing concepts related to psychiatric/mental health. The unique needs of clients with mental-health issues are explored. Building on the foundation of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, the student will examine client responses to stressors across the life span. Tasks of biological-behavioral concepts in psychiatric nursing care, and cultural impacts will be addressed.
Prerequisite: NURS 324 And NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 405L
View Book Information

NURS 405L  (2-0-6)  Psychiatric Nursing Clinical: This course is the clinical component of NURS 405. Students will have dedicated clinical experiences in in-patient, outpatient as well as community based psychiatric/mental health settings.
Prerequisite: NURS 324 And NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 405
View Book Information

NURS 406  (3-3-0)  Community Health Nursing: This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to assist culturally diverse populations and aggregates in the community to achieve an optimum level of wellness. Special emphasis will be placed on advanced theoretical concepts related to health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, and development processes.
Prerequisite: NURS 360 And NURS 360L And NURS 361 And NURS 361L And NURS 401 And NURS 405 And NURS 405L And NURS 451 And NURS 451L. Co-requisite: NURS 406L
View Book Information

NURS 406L  (2-0-6)  Community Health Nursing Clinical: This course is the clinical component of NURS 406. This course provides students with the opportunity to apply community nursing concepts to individuals, families and communities through faculty and preceptor guided clinical experiences.
Prerequisite: NURS 360 And NURS 360L And NURS 361 And NURS 361L And NURS 401 And NURS 405 And NURS 405L And NURS 451 And NURS 451L. Co-requisite: NURS 406
View Book Information

NURS 410  (2-2-0)  Nursing Leadership: This course is designed for the pre-licensure student to analyze the role of the professional nurse as a leader in the profession and health care delivery. The course will focus on nursing leaders as vanguards of the profession and the role of the nurse leader in health care delivery systems. Advance theoretical concepts will be examined using the nursing process as a framework.
Prerequisite: NURS 360 And NURS 360L And NURS 361 And NURS 361L And NURS 401 And NURS 405 And NURS 405L And NURS 451 And NURS 451L
View Book Information

NURS 411  (3-3-0)  Nursing Leadership Perspectives and Trends in Contemporary Nursing Practice: This course is designed to analyze the role of the professional nurse as a leader in the profession and health care delivery. The course will focus on nursing leaders as vanguards of the profession and the role of the nurse leader in health care delivery. Advanced theoretical concepts will be examined using the nursing process as a framework.
Prerequisite: NURS 300
View Book Information

NURS 421  (3-3-0)  Nursing and Women's Health: This course is designed to focus on the current health care challenges and issues of women's health and implications for professional nursing practice. Women's roles in a complex society will be examined to facilitate increased self awareness as consumers and providers in the health care delivery system.
Prerequisite: NURS 300
View Book Information

NURS 430  (5-3-2)  Contemporary Supportive Community Nursing: This course is designed to provide the opportunity for the RN to BSN student to assist culturally diverse populations and aggregates within the community to achieve an optimal level of wellness. Special emphasis will be placed on advanced theoretical concepts related to health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, and developmental processes. The process of professional role development will be fostered through both independent and interdependent clinical experiences.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 And NURS 400 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

NURS 450  (3-3-0)  Professional Nursing Issues in Practice: This course is designed to promote student responsibility and accountability for professional nursing practice by strengthening professional nursing roles and behaviors.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 And NURS 310 And NURS 320 And NURS 325 And NURS 400 And NURS 411 And NURS 330 Or NURS 421
View Book Information

NURS 451  (6-6-0)  Adult Health II: This course is an expansion of Adult Health I and focuses on theoretical, physiological and pathological concepts used to address complex and multi-system health needs of adults and the elderly who are experiencing selected complex health alterations. Topics include the nursing management of clients experiencing selected complex health alterations related to fluid, gastrointestinal, renal/ urinary, endocrine, reproductive, sensory-neural, hematological, and neurological disorders. Additionally, the course will include the care of the critically ill as well as concepts of emergency care and disaster planning.
Prerequisite: NURS 324 And NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 451L
View Book Information

NURS 451L  (3-0-9)  Adult Health II Clinical: This course is the clinical component of NURS 451. Students will have dedicated clinical experiences in acute care settings including critical care units. Students will also be exposed to clinical laboratory experiences including refinement of psychomotor skills and simulation activities related to adult health. The clinical course allows the application of nursing skills, knowledge, and critical thinking necessary for safe effective nursing care of adults.
Prerequisite: NURS 324 And NURS 350 And NURS 350L. Co-requisite: NURS 451
View Book Information

NURS 480  (3-0-9)  Senior Practicum: This practicum course is the capstone experience that includes synthesis of nursing cognates and general education. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to integrate clinical and theoretical learning from previous nursing courses through a role-transition clinical experience. In consultation with the instructor, students plan, coordinate, implement, and evaluate a unique senior project using the nursing process with a focus on a professional nursing role. The purpose is for students to function in one of the professional nursing roles and further the transition from student nurse to professional nurse.
Prerequisite: NURS 300 And NURS 310 And NURS 320 And NURS 325 And NURS 400 And NURS 411 And NURS 430 And NURS 330 Or NURS 421
View Book Information

NURS 481  (2-2-0)  Capstone Theory: This capstone course is designed as a synthesis of theoretical nursing concepts through the use of case studies, application exercises and simulation activities.
Prerequisite: NURS 360 And NURS 360L And NURS 361 And NURS 361L And NURS 401 And NURS 405 And NURS 405L And NURS 451 And NURS 451L. Co-requisite: NURS 481L
View Book Information

NURS 481L  (3-0-9)  Capstone Clinical: This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to comprehensively apply and integrate synthesized theoretical and clinical experiences from previous nursing courses into a capstone experience. This course provides student with the opportunity to comprehensively apply clinical concepts through faculty and preceptor guided clinical experiences.
Prerequisite: NURS 360 And NURS 360L And NURS 361 And NURS 361L And NURS 401 And NURS 405 And NURS 405L And NURS 451 And NURS 451L.Co-requisite: NURS 481
View Book Information

PEDU 100  (1-1-0)  Individual Physical Education Activities: Special activities designed for students with physical disabilities or verified health problems that prevent their participation in vigorous physical education.
View Book Information

PEDU 101  (1-2-0)  Swimming (Coed): An introductory course in the fundamentals of swimming, with instruction provided at the beginning swimmers level of the Red Cross Program.
View Book Information

PEDU 102  (1-2-0)  Dance: A course for beginning dancers, emphasizing movement as a medium of expression in the development of dance technique, locomotor skills, and creativity.
View Book Information

PEDU 103  (1-2-0)  Jogging: This activity course is designed to improve student understanding of the component parts of fitness (muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility and body composition) and their relationship to his/her individual needs.
View Book Information

PEDU 106  (1-2-0)  Beginning Soccer: This course is designed to teach students the fundamental skills and strategies of soccer. The students will understand and become familiar with the rules and regulations, consequently enhancing self-confidence and satisfaction in teaching and participating in soccer.
View Book Information

PEDU 107  (1-2-0)  Weight Training: This course is designed to familiarize students with weight training and body conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on proper lifting techniques, weight training for conditioning, body building, and power lifting.
View Book Information

PEDU 110  (1-2-0)  Softball: The study and practice of the fundamentals of softball, including rules, playing strategies, team offense and defense, and techniques of base running, catching, throwing, and batting.
View Book Information

PEDU 111  (1-2-0)  Stunts, Tumbling and Trampoline: The study and practice of fundamentals for performing beginning stunts and tumbling exercises safely and skillfully.
View Book Information

PEDU 112  (1-2-0)  Golf: The study and practice of beginning golf, with emphasis on terminology, rules, customary courtesies, and appropriate use of the following clubs: mid-irons, short-irons, putter, and woods.
View Book Information

PEDU 120  (1-2-0)  Tennis and Badminton: The study and practice of fundamentals involved in singles and doubles play in tennis and badminton, including rules, techniques, and skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 121  (1-2-0)  Archery and Table-Tennis: A practical study of the historical development, rules, techniques, and basic skills of archery and table tennis.
View Book Information

PEDU 122  (1-2-0)  Volleyball: A practical study of the fundamentals of volleyball, including the historical development of the game and the rules and techniques of serving, setting, volleying, and scoring basic to playing the game.
View Book Information

PEDU 130  (1-2-0)  Basketball: A practical study of the fundamentals of basketball, including the rules and historical development of the game, techniques of passing, dribbling, shooting, and conditioning, playing strategies, and team offense and defense.
View Book Information

PEDU 131  (3-3-0)  Theory of Physical Education: A study of the philosophical, historical, biological, sociological, and psychological foundations of physical education.
View Book Information

PEDU 132  (1-2-0)  Bowling: A practical study of the rules, performance skills, and techniques for beginning bowling.
View Book Information

PEDU 140  (1-2-0)  Conditioning Exercise: A practical study of conditioning exercises, individual and group, for improving health and fitness, posture, and appearance.
View Book Information

PEDU 141  (1-2-0)  Racquetball: This course introduces the beginner to the basic skills of racquetball, including scoreboard and backhand drives, grips, footwork, and serves. Safety considerations as well as rules and terminology are covered. Basic strategy is presented involving the return of service, use of ceiling and rear wall, and passing and kill shots. The course prepares the beginner for play in singles, doubles, and cutthroat.
View Book Information

PEDU 200  (1-2-0)  Swimming I: A course for physical education majors who already swim, emphasizing the following skills: a fully-coordinated crawl stroke, back stroke, open turn, treading water, surface turns, underwater swimming, back float, and standing front dive. (For physical education majors).
View Book Information

PEDU 201  (1-2-0)  Swimming II: A course in swimming emphasizing the following swimming strokes and skills: breast stroke, inverted breast stroke, trudgen crawl, side stroke, American crawl, butterfly, and fundamental diving skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 202  (2-2-0)  Individual and Dual Sports: A practical introduction to the individual and dual sports of archery, camping, and indoor and outdoor games, with emphasis on the knowledge base of each sport, teaching techniques and methods, playing strategies, mechanical analyses, and skill development.
View Book Information

PEDU 204  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Individual and Dual Sports: A practical introduction to the individual and dual sports of tennis, golf, badminton, archery, camping, and recreating sports with emphasis on the knowledge base of each sport, the methods and techniques of teaching each, playing strategies, mechanical analyses, and skill development.
View Book Information

PEDU 210  (2-2-0)  Team Sports I: Soccer and Volleyball: A course in team sports, focusing on development of sport skills in flag/ touch football, volleyball, and soccer. This includes learning techniques for the acquisition and retention of neuromuscular skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 212  (1-1-0)  Gymnastics and Stunts: A course in the development of physical coordination, strength, and related teaching techniques through practice sessions on the trampoline, parallel bars, side horse, and mats.
View Book Information

PEDU 214  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Team Sports: A course in team sports, focusing on the development of sport skills in track and field, flag/ touch football, volleyball, soccer, basketball, and softball. This course includes the learning of methods and techniques for the acquisition and retention of neuromuscular skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 290  (2-3-0)  Modern Dance: A course focusing on the development of kinetic awareness in sequences and movements, with emphasis on a practical knowledge of locomotor and non-locomotor movements related to modern dance basic to enhancing dance techniques, locomotor skills, and creativity.
View Book Information

PEDU 300  (1-2-0)  Practicum in Phy Education: A practical course in physical education incorporating supervised experience in the development of teaching skills and leadership abilities appropriate to classroom settings, with emphasis on arranging equipment, organizing groups for skills practice, measuring and marking play areas, and selecting and administering skills tests.
View Book Information

PEDU 302  (2-2-0)  Motor Learning: A study of the physiological and psychological variables associated with motor performance and skill acquisition and retention, with special attention to theories and principles of psychomotor skills learning, research studies and relevant issues related to motor learning, and the role of physical movement in the acquisition of knowledge and skills in non-motor subject matter areas.
View Book Information

PEDU 310  (2-2-0)  Rhythms and Movement Concepts for Physical Education: A practical study of the rhythmic structures of dance movements and their promotion of motor skill development. The course will also explore the development of physical coordination, strength, and related teaching techniques of floor gymnastics.
View Book Information

PEDU 311  (3-3-0)  History and Principles: An introduction to the philosophical, historical, biological, sociological, and psychological foundations of physical education and sports, sports curriculum development, and motor learning theories.
View Book Information

PEDU 320  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials of Teaching Health Education and Physical Education: An introduction to methods and materials basic to elementary school health and physical education programs.
View Book Information

PEDU 321  (3-3-0)  Early Childhood Physical Education K-6: An in-depth experience in the teaching of physical education activities to preschool and primary children.
View Book Information

PEDU 322  (3-3-0)  Physical Education in Middle Grades 6-9: An introduction to methods and materials basic to developing programs and teaching physical education activities appropriate to children in the Middle Grades.
View Book Information

PEDU 331  (3-3-0)  Kinesiology: A study of the musculature and bone structure of the human body and their relationship to physical movement, joint mechanisms, leverage, and muscle actions.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 210
View Book Information

PEDU 341  (3-2-0)  Basketball Theory: An exploration of theories of basketball, with additional emphasis on organization and supervision of programs, motivation, evaluation, ethics, philosophy, planning, drills, and offensive and defensive skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 342  (3-3-0)  Track Theory: An introduction to the theories and practices of teaching and coaching specific track events, with emphasis on research and performance techniques, track and field meet administration, and rules of the sport.
View Book Information

PEDU 351  (3-2-0)  Football Theory: An exploration of theories of football, with additional emphasis on organization and supervision of programs, motivation, evaluation, ethics, philosophy, planning, drills, and offensive and defensive skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 360  (3-3-0)  Theory and Practice in Elementary Physical Education: A practical study of the place of physical activities in the total development of elementary age students (K-6), with emphasis on methods and materials for incorporating in the curriculum such activities as movement education, rhythms, mimetics, relays, combatives, selftesting, games of low organization, and singing games.
View Book Information

PEDU 361  (2-2-0)  Sport Officiating: A study of the rules and mechanics for officiating at various seasonal sports, with practical experience in officiating at university intramural programs and in observing and evaluating officials in regularly scheduled contests.
View Book Information

PEDU 362  (3-3-0)  Lifesaving and Water Instruction: A course to provide students with the knowledge and skills to save their own lives or the life of another in the event of an emergency. Major emphasis will be placed on personal safety, self rescue, rescue training skills, and back injury problems. Instruction and participation in swimming for the development of advanced skills and techniques will include methods and materials for teaching all levels of swimming.
Prerequisite: PEDU 201
View Book Information

PEDU 411  (3-3-0)  Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education: A study of the organization and administration of programs in health and physical education, including such topics as philosophy, program planning, course evaluation, staffing, facilities and equipment management, athletic activities, budgeting and finance, and public relations.
View Book Information

PEDU 421  (3-3-0)  Measurement and Evaluation: A study of measurement and evaluation in health and physical education, including the selection and administration of appropriate tests and the use of fundamental statistical procedures to calculate and interpret results.
View Book Information

PEDU 431  (3-3-0)  Adapted Physical Education: A study of principles and methods for adapting health and physical education programs to handicapping conditions. These principles and methods will be demonstrated by evaluations of physical, perceptual motor, and postural fitness levels, and the design, implementation, and evaluation of an active diversified adapted program. A 25 clock hour laboratory experience is required.
View Book Information

PEDU 440  (3-3-0)  Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education: A study of and an introduction to measurement and evaluation in health and physical education, including the selection and administration of appropriate tests and the use of fundamental statistical procedures to calculate and interpret results.
View Book Information

PEDU 442  (3-3-0)  Modern Dance Theory: A course incorporating the analysis and practice of skills, the exercise of creative processes, and the acquisition of knowledge involved in modern dance.
View Book Information

PEDU 450  (4-4-0)  Physiology of Exercise and Kinesiology: This course explores the study of the musculature and bone structure of the human body and their relationship to physical movement, joint mechanisms, leverages and muscle action. This course will also emphasize the physiological effect of exercise on the various body systems with emphasis on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. The use of laboratory techniques in monitoring physiological parameters will also be visited.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
View Book Information

PEDU 452  (3-3-0)  The Intramural Sports Program: A practical study of the organization and administration of public and collegiate sports programs.
View Book Information

PEDU 460  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Physical Education K-12: A course for physical education majors emphasizing the importance of physical activity in the total development of the elementary and secondary student, with attention to the methods and materials, objectives and characteristics of activities appropriate to students in grades K-12, and to techniques for evaluating movement, locomotor, and non-locomotor skills.
View Book Information

PEDU 462  (3-3-0)  Physiology of Exercise: A study of the physiological effects of exercise on the various body systems, with emphasis on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems, and on laboratory techniques for monitoring physiological parameters.
Prerequisite: PEDU 331
View Book Information

PEDU 463  (3-3-0)  Athletic Injuries: A practical study of the principles and applications basic to the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.
View Book Information

PEDU 471  (3-33-0)  Research Methodology: A critical analysis and investigation of the current research methods applicable to health and physical education and the changing academic climate.
View Book Information

PEDU 472  (3-3-0)  Sports in Contemporary American Society: An interdisciplinary course introducing the social, economic, ethical, moral, and recreational aspects of sports in contemporary society, with special examination of such topics as aggression in sports, the roles of blacks and women in sports, exploitation in sports, and the entertainment value of sports.
View Book Information

PEDU 482  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Coaching: A practical study of problems specifically related to coaching, such as recruiting, acquiring a thorough grounding in game rules and playing techniques, organizing practices, and side-line coaching.
View Book Information

PEDU 483  (3-3-0)  Supervision of Health and Physical Education: An analysis of current supervisory practices relative to physical education programs in city, county, and state school systems, with emphasis on program planning, fiscal management, and laws pertaining to the conduct of health and physical education programs.
View Book Information

PEDU 492  (3-3-0)  Wrestling: A course focusing on the basic skills, tactics, strategies, rules and regulations involved in wrestling.
View Book Information

PHIL 110  (3-3-0)  Critical Thinking: An introduction to the basic elements of argumentation, focusing on the analysis, evaluation, and development of claims and arguments in the sciences, the humanities, the social sciences, the applied sciences, and everyday life experiences. The course will strengthen the student’s abilities to analyze, evaluate, and develop claims and arguments.
View Book Information

PHIL 120  (3-3-0)  Moral Principles and Contemporary Moral Issues: This course reviews moral principles and theories and applies them to such contemporary ethical issues as abortion, war, capital punishment, discrimination, poverty, and the environment. Analyzing and evaluating the variety of moral arguments brought to bear on such issues is a major focus of the course.
View Book Information

PHIL 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Philosophy: An analytical study of ancient and modern philosophical problems in metaphysics, the philosophy of religion, epistemology, ethics, and political philosophy, with emphasis on encouraging critical approaches to theoretical and practical issues.
View Book Information

PHIL 211  (3-3-0)  Introduction to World Religions: An examination of the religions of the world, including the nature of religious beliefs, spiritual beings and powers, myths, rituals, ethics, religious claims and arguments, and the impact of religions on culture, politics, society, and the daily lives of believers. Traditional African religions, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, religions of Meso America, religions of Native Americans, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, and Sikhism will be addressed.
View Book Information

PHIL 212  (3-3-0)  African-American Philosophy: This course is a critical examination of the following concepts and issues pertaining to the African-American experience in historical and contemporary periods: oppression, resistance, justice, liberation, separatism, integration, affirmative action, identity, self-respect, race, class, gender, the universality of Western Philosophy, and cultural features of philosophy. These concepts and issues will be addressed through an analysis of writings by major figures such as: Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Alain Locke, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, William Jones, Cornel West, Angela Davis, Leonard Harris, Lucius Outlaw, and Bernard Boxill.
View Book Information

PHIL 220  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Logic: An introduction to techniques of correct reasoning in informal contexts, to Aristotelian and mathematical logic, and to practical applications of logic, for example, in addressing contemporary issues and in completing the logic sections of national examinations such as the GRE, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT, and PRAXIS.
View Book Information

PHIL 230  (3-3-0)  Political and Social Philosophy: An introduction to traditional and contemporary social-political thought and its relationship to practice, with emphasis on the interdependence of economic and sociopolitical issues and on the African viewpoint and its relationship to other world views.
View Book Information

PHIL 310  (3-3-0)  Philosophy of Religion: A course examining the claims of religion from a logical point of view and covering such topics as traditional arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, evolution, knowledge and belief, religion and morality, religious experience and verification, and existentialism.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 315  (3-3-0)  Philosophy of Mind: This course addresses such key, perennial issues in the philosophy of mind as the nature of mind; the relationship of mind to body; the origin of mind; and the evolutionary function and value of mind. Because these issues have been traditionally addressed by philosophy and psychology, and more recently investigated by the empirical methods of neuroscience, it is appropriate and necessary that the course be interdisciplinary among these fields.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 320  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Ethics: A philosophical exploration of the basis of the good life, involving approaches to the problems of moral belief and practices.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 330  (3-3-0)  Ancient and Medieval Philosophy: A study of major philosophical developments from the ancient Greeks through the medieval period, emphasizing Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas. Students will develop skills in the analysis, development, and evaluation of claims and arguments connected with the ancient and medieval period.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 340  (3-3-0)  Modern Philosophy: This course provides a study of major philosophical developments of the modern period, with emphasis on the arguments of the rationalists and empiricists. Students will develop skills in the analysis, development, and evaluation of claims and arguments of the modern period.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 360  (3-3-0)  Existentialism: This seminar in philosophy provides a study of Existentialism as a response to the philosophical problems unique to the post-industrial societies as articulated by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, et al. Focusing primarily on such major existential themes as choice, responsibility, identity, freedom, and alienation, the students will explore the common concern of these thinkers about human existence and the conditions and quality of the life of the individual.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 370  (3-3-0)  Philosophy of Science: This course provides a philosophical exploration of issues in the philosophy of science and technology, and of problems of scientific belief and practice. Topic areas include the value of science; the nature of scientific activities; science and myth; generalization and related inductive reasoning; causal reasoning; scientific theories; science and society; change in science; and, scientific explanation. Students will develop skills in the analysis, development, and evaluation of scientific claims and scientific arguments.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHIL 430  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Philosophy: Individual or group study and critical discussion of selected philosophical issues.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
View Book Information

PHYS 110  (2-2-0)  Basic Physics: An introduction to fundamental concepts of measurements, dimensions and units, scalars and vectors, forces and free-body diagrams, work and energy, with attention to the improvement of problem solving and computational skills.
Prerequisite: MATH 123
View Book Information

PHYS 111  (4-3-2)  General Physics I: An introductory study of the phenomena and concepts of classical physics, emphasizing mechanics, wave motion, fluids, temperature, and heat, with laboratory exercises providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: MATH 124 Or MATH 129 Or MATH 130
View Book Information

PHYS 112  (4-3-2)  General Physics II: A continuation of PHYS 111, emphasizing the principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and physical optics, with laboratory exercises providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to the topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: PHYS 111
View Book Information

PHYS 113  (2-2-0)  General Physics III: A continuation of PHYS 112, emphasizing the concepts and principles of modern physics, including special relativity, quantum physics, nuclear and high energy physics. Conceptual demonstrations of essential principles will be an integrated feature of this course.
Prerequisite: PHYS 112
View Book Information

PHYS 121  (4-3-2)  College Physics I: A calculus-based introductory study of Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, thermodynamics, and related concepts, with special emphasis on problem-solving and with laboratory experiences providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently) And MATH 142
View Book Information

PHYS 122  (4-3-2)  College Physics II: A continuation of PHYS 121, emphasizing the principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and physical optics, with laboratory exercises providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in lectures.
Prerequisite: PHYS 121
View Book Information

PHYS 123  (2-2-0)  College Physics III: A continuation of PHYS 122, emphasizing the principles of special relativity, quantum physics, nuclear and high energy physics. Demonstrations of essential principles will be an integrated feature of this course.
Prerequisite: PHYS 122
View Book Information

PHYS 211  (4-3-2)  Mechanics: An intermediate-level concentration in mechanics dealing with vector analysis, central force problems, rotational motion, and time, position, and velocity dependent forces, steady state and time varying forced oscillations and the Lagrangian method. Laboratory exercises complement theoretical concepts covered in the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 331 (may be taken concurrently) And PHYS 121 And MATH 242
View Book Information

PHYS 212  (4-3-2)  Heat: An intermediate-level concentration in thermodynamics dealing with the laws of thermodynamics, open and closed systems, kinetic theory of gases, heat engines, and statistical mechanics with laboratory exercises complementing theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 And PHYS 122
View Book Information

PHYS 301  (4-3-2)  Electronics for Scientists: An introduction to the foundations of electronics for students of the sciences, with specific consideration of the properties of semi conducting elements. The course emphasizes various types of electronic circuits and devices such as amplifiers, and other solid state devices, using linear and digital circuits. Construction and analysis of electronic circuits and devices, with experimental demonstrations of their uses, are essential components of the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently) And PHYS 112 Or PHYS 123 And MATH 142
View Book Information

PHYS 302  (4-3-2)  Biophysics: An introduction to the basic principles of electricity, mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, and acoustics to living organisms and the biosphere. Beginning with the subatomic level, the basic knowledge of physics is used to understand the structure and function of macro-molecules, cellular organelles, the processes occurring within the cell, and behavior of organisms in the environment. The treatment of biological phenomena will be based on physical principles with appropriate mathematics when necessary.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently) And PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122
View Book Information

PHYS 311  (4-3-2)  Electricity and Magnetism I: An intermediate-level presentation of the principles and theories of electricity and magnetism, with applications of Maxwell equations and boundary value problems and with laboratory exercises complementing theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 331 And PHYS 122 And PHYS 211
View Book Information

PHYS 312  (4-3-2)  Electricity and Magnetism II: An intermediate-level presentation of the principles and theories of electricity and magnetism, with emphasis on boundary value problems, collision processes, radiation, and relativity.
Prerequisite: PHYS 311
View Book Information

PHYS 390  (3-3-0)  Fire Dynamics: An examination of fire dynamics within the context of firefighting and its application to fire situations, including combustion, flame spread, flashover, and smoke movement, as well as applications to building codes, large-loss fires, and fire modeling.
View Book Information

PNUR 210  (2-2-0)  Introduction to Professional Nursing: An introductory nursing course that covers the history of nursing, theoretical foundations of nursing, the roles of the professional nurse, professional behaviors, and an introduction to the nursing process and critical thinking.
View Book Information

POLI 150  (3-3-0)  North Carolina Government and Politics: This course is concerned with the evolution and empirical foundation of North Carolina government and politics. It investigates issues related to community power and decision-making, political leadership, the relationship between North Carolina citizens and their government, citizen participation, and civic engagement and moral issues in political lives.
View Book Information

POLI 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Political Science: The study of the basic principles and concepts of political science with emphasis on the nature and function of political systems. Various approaches to the study of politics and the relationship of political science to other social sciences will be examined.
View Book Information

POLI 210  (3-3-0)  Principles of American Government: An introduction to the historical background, purposes, and functions of political institutions, especially the structures and activities of the American system - federal, state, and local.
View Book Information

POLI 220  (3-3-0)  Principles of Public Administration: A study of basic concepts of administration including the following topics: the growth of administration as an art and a science; the relationship of administration to the political process; administrative organization and processes; the political power of bureaucracies; and the responsibility of public servants.
View Book Information

POLI 230  (3-3-0)  Ethics and Global Affairs: The course will challenge students to apply theoretical discussions in a practical way to international ethical problems. It will examine great normative questions of international relations and challenge students to consider what those questions mean for how students conduct themselves as global citizens. Normative questions involve considerations of right and wrong, where the “rightness” and “wrongness” of the action is measured by some conception of the good.
View Book Information

POLI 240  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Political Statistics: This course is designed for students to integrate empirical analyses and research methods with the substance of political and social research. Statistical techniques and applications have been chosen for their relevance to political science and policy analysis. This approach should make the study of statistics more meaningful and valuable to those who are uncertain about the role of statistical analysis in the social sciences.
View Book Information

POLI 301  (3-3-0)  Organizational Theory: An analysis of organizational theories, incorporating the traditional political, environmental, behavioral, bureaucratic, and decision-making approaches and applying them to studies of modern organizations, with additional attention to current research on contemporary issues demonstrating the continuing development of organizational theory.
View Book Information

POLI 311  (3-3-0)  Political Parties and Pressure Groups: A study of the history, structure, and functions of American political parties and pressure groups, their relationship to democratic government, and their techniques of political action.
View Book Information

POLI 312  (3-3-0)  Public Leadership and Management: A course focusing on leadership styles, human motivations, and basic problems of management, including decision-making, communications, and public relations.
View Book Information

POLI 320  (3-3-0)  State and Local Government: An examination of the framework of state and local governments in the United States and an evaluation of their contributions to federal systems, with special attention to North Carolina's governmental structure and contributions.
View Book Information

POLI 321  (3-3-0)  Public Personnel Management: A study of the theory, practice, and organization of the public personnel system in the United States, including the essentials of personnel training, classification, compensation, promotion, testing, employee relations, and employee organizations.
View Book Information

POLI 330  (3-3-0)  Public Financial Management: A study of the practices and problems of modern fiscal management, with special emphasis on budgeting concerns and techniques, budget management for planning and control, and budget review as an analytical tool at the national, state, and local levels of government.
View Book Information

POLI 331  (3-3-0)  Politics and Urban Planning: A study of approaches to urban planning in the light of political realities in the nation, the state, and the community.
View Book Information

POLI 332  (3-3-0)  The Legislative Process: A study of the evolution, structure, functioning processes, and dynamics of American legislative institutions, with emphasis on the interrelationships among the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches and outside groups in the law-making process.
View Book Information

POLI 350  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Africa: A course examining characteristics of governments and politics in the developing nations of Africa, with attention to such concerns as colonialism, independence movements, and the problems of nation building.
View Book Information

POLI 351  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Europe: A comparative analysis of the organization, functioning, and processes of governments and politics in the Soviet Union and selected European countries.
View Book Information

POLI 352  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Asia: A course analyzing the organization, functioning, and processes of governments and politics in China, Japan, and other Asian nations.
View Book Information

POLI 400  (3-3-0)  Administration of Urban Government: A study of the organization and management characteristics of various types of government entities in urban areas, including municipal government, county government, and governmental structures for other special districts.
View Book Information

POLI 401  (3-3-0)  Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations: A course focusing on changing relationships of local, state, and federal agencies, the expanding role of regional planning boards, and recent developments in the sharing of federal tax revenue with non-national governments.
View Book Information

POLI 402  (3-3-0)  Public Policy Formulation: A course covering approaches to decision-making in government and administration, including policy formulation within administrative agencies and departments and within the larger context of the overall political process.
View Book Information

POLI 410  (3-3-0)  The American Chief Executive: A study of the origin, background, and evolution of the Office of the President of the United States, with a review of the president's powers in the areas of politics, administration, legislation, and foreign affairs.
Prerequisite: POLI 210
View Book Information

POLI 411  (3-3-0)  Public Opinion and Propaganda: A study of the development of attitudes and beliefs, the nature of public opinion and propaganda, the methodology of public opinion polling, and the strategies and techniques for influencing public opinion through the uses of propaganda, mass media, and communications.
View Book Information

POLI 412  (3-3-0)  Administrative Law: An investigation of administrative law, its powers and procedures, the liabilities of administrative agencies and officers, and governmental activities in the regulation of agriculture, industry, and labor.
View Book Information

POLI 420  (3-3-0)  Research Methods in Public Management: A review of basic concepts, ideas, approaches, methods, and materials used to study administrative institutions, including simulation techniques, surveys, mathematical statistics, cybernetics, content analysis, and computers.
View Book Information

POLI 422  (3-3-0)  American Foreign Policy: A study of American foreign policy decision-making with assessments of the effectiveness of foreign policies.
View Book Information

POLI 430  (3-3-0)  International Politics: A study of the interplay of political forces in the international community, with emphasis on war-time diplomacy, peace treaties, and alignments of nations in times of peace and conflict during the postwar period.
View Book Information

POLI 431  (3-3-0)  International Organization: A study of the basic concepts, historical backgrounds, evolution, and functioning of international governmental and administrative systems, with primary emphasis on the United Nations.
View Book Information

POLI 432  (3-3-0)  International Law: A review of the rules and practices governing nations in peace and war; the nature, sources, evolution, and functioning of various schools of international law; principal law-making and adjudicatory agencies; international personalities; treaties; jurisdictions over person and place; diplomatic and consular interactions; peace settlements; war and neutrality.
View Book Information

POLI 440  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Government Planning: A study of concepts, fundamentals, and methods of planning, focusing on the significance of planning to public administration and public policy, with special consideration of Program Planning Budgeting Systems (PPBS), Management by Objectives (MBO), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), Planning, Management, and Evaluation (PME), and Zero Base Budgeting (ZBB).
View Book Information

POLI 441  (3-3-0)  Citizen Participation in Policy Making: A study of citizens┐ involvement in political activities and in government policy making, with analyses of citizen initiated and government sponsored efforts to increase popular input, and assessments of the effects of citizen participation on policy making related to specific issues and to the performance of governments.
View Book Information

POLI 442  (3-3-0)  Public Policy Analysis: A study of the methods and techniques used in determining the effectiveness of public programs, with emphasis on the development of appropriate systems for conducting evaluations and with the use of case studies for practical exercises in policy analysis.
View Book Information

POLI 450  (3-3-0)  History of Political Theory: A survey of political theories and their practical applications from the days of ancient Greece to the sixteenth-century theorist, Jean Bodin.
Prerequisite: POLI 200
View Book Information

POLI 460  (3-3-0)  History of Political Theory II: A continuation of the study of political theories from Thomas Hobbes to the present.
Prerequisite: POLI 200
View Book Information

POLI 461  (3-3-0)  American Political Ideas: A study of the political ideas of leading American political leaders and public officials, with particular attention to the influences of these ideas upon American governmental systems.
Prerequisite: POLI 210 And POLI 200
View Book Information

POLI 470  (3-3-0)  Government Internship: Supervised experience in the application of principles and techniques to various areas of public service, with supervision and evaluation under the direction of the instructor in cooperation with administrators of selected public agencies in the state, and with requirements including one-hour a week in lectures and conferences and at least nine hours a week on assignment at public agencies.
View Book Information

POLI 471  (3-3-0)  Research Seminar: Practical experience in applying the research methods introduced in POLI 420 to in-depth studies of selected topics, incorporating computer technology for data gathering, analyses, and interpretation.
Prerequisite: POLI 420
View Book Information

POLI 480  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Intensive independent studies of selected topics, requiring the preparation and presentation of assigned topics for critical review.
View Book Information

POLI 481  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar - Selected Problems in Public Management: An analysis of problems in public management created by or associated with technological advancements, environmental changes, urbanism, the civil rights movement, ethics and values, private rights, and changing expectations.
View Book Information

POLI 490  (3-3-0)  Advanced Reading and Research: Supervised reading and research in areas of special interest.
View Book Information

POSC 101  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Law Enforcement: A study of the philosophy and history of law enforcement, including its legal limitations in a democratic republic; a survey of the primary duties and responsibilities of the various law enforcement agencies; a delineation of the basic processes of justice; an evaluation of law enforcement's current position; and an orientation relative to law enforcement as a vocation. Students who have completed CRJC 201 may not take this course.
View Book Information

POSC 102  (3-3-0)  Highway Traffic Administration: An examination of the U.S. transportation system, including a study of complementary agencies that contribute to the effectiveness of operations within the system through the organization and administration of traffic flow regulations, traffic laws, traffic control, accident investigations, traffic courts, and regular operational analyses, with additional attention to the social, economic, and political impacts of the transportation system, including the complementary agencies in their contributory roles.
View Book Information

POSC 111  (3-3-0)  Criminal Law: A presentation of the basic concepts of criminal law and an evaluation of the merits of rules of law and order in our system of government. Students who have completed CRJC 300 may not take this course.
View Book Information

POSC 210  (3-3-0)  Criminal Investigation: An introduction to the fundamentals of investigation, including procedures and techniques for conducting crime scene searches; recording, collecting and preserving evidence; identifying, using, and protecting sources of information; conducting interviews and interrogations; preparing cases and making court presentations; and investigating specific criminal offenses. Students who have completed CRJC 210 may not take this course.
View Book Information

POSC 221  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Criminalistics: A general survey of the methods and techniques used in modern scientific investigations of crimes, with emphasis on practical applications of demonstrated laboratory techniques and the use of available scientific equipment. Students who have completed CRJC 221 may not take this course.
View Book Information

POSC 230  (3-3-0)  Criminal Evidence: POSC 230 (3-3-0) Criminal Evidence (CRJC 230); A study of the kinds and degrees of evidence and the rules governing the admissibility of evidence in court. Students who have completed CRJC 230 may not take this course.
View Book Information

POSC 232  (3-3-0)  Police Organization and Administration: An introduction to the principles of police organization and administration, with special attention to the service functions; e.g., personnel management, police management, training, communications, records, property maintenance, and miscellaneous services.
View Book Information

POSC 241  (3-3-0)  Crime Scene Technology: A review of processes governing the search for physical evidence, with emphasis on the location, reproduction, identification, collection, and preservation of evidence, and of the transportation of evidence to the crime laboratory, with laboratory situations providing practical experiences in applications of techniques and procedures studied.
View Book Information

POSC 251  (3-3-0)  Criminal Procedures: A review of criminal procedures from incident to final disposition and a survey of the principles of constitutional, federal, state, and civil laws relative to law enforcement.
View Book Information

POSC 262  (3-3-0)  Police Community Relations: A course in the development and use of community relations programs to aid and support the police, corrections programs, and the criminal justice system as a whole in their promotion of an orderly society. Students who have completed CRJC 262 may not take this course.
View Book Information

POSC 400  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Criminal Interrogation and Confessions: A study of criminal interrogations and confessions, including such aspects as warning the subject, the Fourth Amendment Right of Privacy, the attitude of the interrogator, the classification of suspects for interrogation, tactics at interrogations, the interrogation of witnesses who may later become suspects, psychological tools to be used in extracting a confession from an unwilling suspect, procedures for reading suspects their rights and for informing them of those rights, the laws governing the admissibility of confessions in court, the use of trickery and deceit, and the latest laws- both federal and state-regarding, confessions and interrogations.
Prerequisite: POSC 101 Or CRJC 101 And CRJC 300
View Book Information

PSCI 111  (4-4-0)  Physical Science I: An introduction to the principles, concepts, and ideas of the physical sciences (physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography), including lectures, discussions, and laboratory sessions devoted to physics and chemistry, with opportunities for making observations, developing problem-solving techniques, and using reasoning skills in guided applications of the scientific method.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

PSCI 112  (4-4-0)  Physical Science II: A continuation of the principles, concepts, and ideas begun in Physical Science 1, including lectures, discussions, and laboratory sessions devoted to astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography, with opportunities for making observations, developing problem-solving techniques, and using reasoning skills in guided applications of the scientific method.
Prerequisite: PSCI 111
View Book Information

PSYC 210  (3-3-0)  General Psychology: An introduction to the study of psychology as a science and the application of the scientific method in the understanding of behavior, with emphasis on such behavioral phenomena as learning, motivation, emotions, memory and problem solving, personality and development, behavior disorders, and psychotherapy.
View Book Information

PSYC 233  (4-4-0)  Statistics for Psychology: A study of basic statistical theory and techniques appropriate to psychology and related fields; introduction to statistical inference and the testing of hypotheses. This course includes a lab which incorporates the use of computer packages for statistical analyses.
Prerequisite: PSYC 210 And MATH 123 Or higher
View Book Information

PSYC 300  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Personal Adjustment: A study of coping mechanisms and adjustment strategies for meeting the everyday demands of life and dealing with special psychological problems, such as stress, depression, anxiety, deviant sexual behavior, sexual dysfunction, and other everyday problems.
View Book Information

PSYC 310  (3-3-0)  Theories of Personality: An investigation of theories concerning the development and functioning of the normal personality, with attention to empirical findings related to individual adjustment or maladjustment.
View Book Information

PSYC 320  (3-3-0)  Theories of Learning: A review of major theories of human and animal learning and motivation, with emphasis on individual and environmental factors affecting learning and performance in various contexts, including experimental and educational settings.
View Book Information

PSYC 331  (3-3-0)  Developmental Psychology: An introduction to developmental psychology, focusing on the period from conception through adolescence, with emphasis on developmental principles and theories in the areas of cognitive, emotional, social, personality, and physical development.
View Book Information

PSYC 332  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Aging: An introduction to adult development and human aging, including a survey of major developmental principles, theories, and current research in the areas of biological, cognitive, social, personality, and emotional development.
View Book Information

PSYC 342  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A survey of the history, theories, and applications of clinical and counseling psychology, with an emphasis on analyses of the various approaches to counseling and therapy.
View Book Information

PSYC 343  (3-3-0)  Multicultural Psychology: A study of the development of ethnic psychology, with emphasis on related theories and research and on the interactions of ethnic Americans with educational, political, religious, and social institutions.
View Book Information

PSYC 345  (3-3-0)  Positive Psychology: This course is designed to provide an introduction to positive psychology. Positive psychology focuses on the scientific study of human strengths and virtues. The course will examine human behavior that is effective, valuable, and results in positive contributions to human development. The format of the course will be didactic, experiential, and interactive.
View Book Information

PSYC 350  (3-3-0)  Industrial and Organizational Psychology: A study of psychological factors influencing performance in work settings, especially group processes, employee motivation, leadership, selection, and training, with additional emphasis on the analysis and design of jobs and organizations.
View Book Information

PSYC 352  (4-3-1)  Research Methodology: A lecture and laboratory course covering the design, analysis, implementation, and interpretation of experimental research in areas of general psychology, such as learning, memory, and perception, and in social psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 233
View Book Information

PSYC 354  (3-3-0)  Writing for Psychology: The course is designed to teach students the basic mechanics of writing in psychology. Topics to be discussed in this course will include orderly and precise presentation of ideas, smoothness and economy of expression, and the preparation of manuscripts according to the standards of the American Psychological Association.
View Book Information

PSYC 360  (3-3-0)  Social Psychology: A study of individual behavior influenced and affected by social factors, with emphasis on socialization, attitude formation, and change, with additional attention to interpersonal attraction, leadership, and other behaviors in group settings.
View Book Information

PSYC 365  (3-3-0)  Health Psychology: An examination of the links between medicine and psychology, including the relevance of biological, personal, cognitive, developmental, social, environmental, and cultural variables to health and illness. Health, illness, health and illness behavior will be studied with the aim of greater understanding of health issues and the individuals┐ relationship to these issues within individual, cultural and cross-cultural contexts.
View Book Information

PSYC 370  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Biopsychology: A study of background and contemporary research relating behavior to biological processes. Data on neural and hormonal systems are summarized and used in examining such complex behaviors as learning, perception, and motivation.
View Book Information

PSYC 380  (3-3-0)  Behavior Modification: A study of applications of learning theories and laboratory findings to behavior problems in educational, clinical, and social settings, with emphasis on empirical research demonstrating the effectiveness of behavior modification and cognitive/behavioral techniques.
View Book Information

PSYC 381  (3-3-0)  Child Psychopathology: A survey of factors affecting psychological development from infancy through adolescence, with emphasis on conceptual models, assessment approaches, and treatment of abnormalities.
Prerequisite: PSYC 331
View Book Information

PSYC 390  (3-3-0)  Psych Tests and Measurements: A survey of the major methods of evaluating and comparing psychological and physical abilities, including methods of measurement, basic statistical concepts relative to evaluation, and applications of psychological testing.
Prerequisite: PSYC 233
View Book Information

PSYC 400  (3-3-0)  History and Systems of Psychology: A survey of the development of psychology in historical and socio-cultural perspective. A review of the major historical and contemporary systems of psychology, and their relation to the philosophy of science and to the selection of problems and methodologies.
Prerequisite: PSYC 352
View Book Information

PSYC 403  (3-3-0)  Psychopharmacology: A study of the effect of pharmacological agents on the brain and behavior. This class fosters a multilayered approach, from the receptor level to system and behavioral level. Every drug and its psycho-physiological effects are discussed in the social context where it occurs.
Prerequisite: PSYC 370
View Book Information

PSYC 420  (3-3-0)  Sensation and Perception: A study of the structures and functions of the sensory systems, with particular attention to perceptual processes influenced and affected by physical factors in the environment and by psychological aspects of the perceiving organism.
Prerequisite: PSYC 370
View Book Information

PSYC 421  (3-3-0)  Cognitive Psychology: A study of theoretical approaches and research findings relevant to the complex processes of thinking, linguistic expression, problem solving, and decision making, with attention to the relation of these processes to intelligence and creativity.
View Book Information

PSYC 422  (3-3-0)  Abnormal Psychology: A survey of disturbances of personality and behavior and of the major viewpoints regarding causes, prevention, and treatment.
View Book Information

PSYC 430  (3-3-0)  Advance Seminar Sex and Gender: This senior seminar will explore how various areas of psychology conceptualize and investigate the relationship between sexuality and gender. The study of gender/sexual relations will be approached from many different perspectives, including individual, social, cultural, historical, and biological. Sources will include journal articles, books, and fictional stories.
Prerequisite: PSYC 352
View Book Information

PSYC 433  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Language: Understanding language is an important part of understanding human behavior. Different areas of scientific study emphasize different aspects of language processing. This class reviews the biological bases of language development, word recognition, meaning and use of language, as well as language production. Combining insights from neuroscience and psycholinguistics, this class has a cognitive emphasis and it requires that the student is familiar with general concepts of Cognitive Psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 421
View Book Information

PSYC 443  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Animal Behavior: This course focuses on understanding the evolution, expression, organization, and modification of animal behavior. Behavioral variation as well as the conservative nature of many behavioral responses will be addressed. The course will consider how the study of behavior in animals other than humans may help us to understand human behavior as well as to better conserve threatened or endangered species.
Prerequisite: PSYC 233 And PSYC 352
View Book Information

PSYC 460  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: A study of selected contemporary topics examining the functional interrelationships of research, theory, and/or application within the various areas of psychology.
View Book Information

PSYC 465  (3-3-0)  Biopsychology Laboratory: The aim of the Biopsychology Laboratory is to introduce students to paradigms for the explanation and study of behavior that are characterized by a focus on the functioning of the nervous system. This lab will examined these functions within the broader framework of the structures of behavior (innate and acquired), as well as functional systems (sensation, perception, motor control and cognition).
Prerequisite: PSYC 370
View Book Information

PSYC 469  (3-3-0)  Advanced Biopsychology: Examines broad range of questions about how the nervous systems are organized, and how they function to generate behavior. These questions are explored using the analytical tools of molecular and cell biology, genetics; questions are explored using the analytical tools of molecular and cell biology, genetics, systems anatomy, and physiology. The student will focus on an advanced understanding of central nervous system processes.
Prerequisite: PSYC 370
View Book Information

PSYC 470  (3-3-0)  Emotions: This course is designed to provide an overview of emotion, focusing on a variety of theoretical perspectives: cognitive, biological, developmental, evolutionary, historical, and social/ cultural. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of the neural and neurohormonal correlates of emotional behaviors and emotional experiences. Emphasis is placed upon the similarity between the emotional behaviors of humans and other species and in determining both normal and abnormal human emotional experiences.
Prerequisite: PSYC 370
View Book Information

PSYC 475  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Evolutionary Psychology: This course is designed to convey the historical antecedents of evolutionary psychology and provide a reasonably thorough and balanced assessment of its methods, potential, and the criticisms leveled against it. This course will include a survey of the areas of research in evolutionary psychology and such topics as the evolution of action and feeling; cooperation; development and family dynamics; and higher cognition.
View Book Information

PSYC 485  (3-3-0)  Individual Topics in Psychology: Systematic review of various topics on issues of psychological relevance, such as stress management, and sexual reinstatement.
View Book Information

PSYC 489  (3-3-0)  Independent Study I: Supervised library, laboratory, and/or field research in psychology on a student's topic of choice (topic determined in consultation with a faculty supervisor).
View Book Information

PSYC 490  (3-3-0)  Independent Study II: Supervised library, laboratory, and/or field research in psychology on a topic of choice of a student.
View Book Information

PSYC 491  (3-3-0)  Independent Study III: Supervised library, laboratory, and/or field research in psychology on a student's topic of choice (topic determined in consultation with a faculty supervisor).
View Book Information

PSYC 492  (3-3-0)  Independent Study IV: Supervised library, laboratory, and/or field research in psychology on a student's topic of choice (topic determined in consultation with a faculty supervisor).
View Book Information

PSYC 493  (3-3-0)  Independent Study V: Supervised library, laboratory, and/or field research in psychology on a student's topic of choice (topic determined in consultation with a faculty supervisor).
View Book Information

READ 300  (3-3-0)  New Literacies of 21st Century: This course is designed to explore the reading process, factors that affect reading development, and the changing nature of literacy in the 21st Century, including an examination of reading comprehension and learning using the internet versus print-based reading environments.
View Book Information

READ 316  (3-3-0)  Corrective and Remedial Reading: A course in the prevention, diagnosis, and correction of reading difficulties.
View Book Information

READ 320  (3-3-0)  Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: A study of methods, materials, classroom procedures, and evaluation techniques for facilitating reading in the content areas in middle and secondary schools. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

READ 370  (3-3-0)  Linguistics and Reading: This course focuses on the purposes of literacy instruction, which includes helping children develop their oral language skills, and describing how reading and writing develop. Emphasis is placed on providing a wide variety of activities for preschoolers to stimulate language development and literacy. Assessing children's progress in literacy is also addressed.
View Book Information

READ 380  (3-3-0)  Practicum in Teaching Reading to Adult Non-Readers: A practical course in assessing the reading needs of adult non-readers and in designing remedial programs to address reading deficiencies.
View Book Information

READ 390  (3-3-0)  Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading: A study of reading problems, materials, methods, and instructional media basic to the effective teaching of reading.
View Book Information

READ 400  (3-3-0)  Practicum in the Correction of Reading and Related Disorders: A clinical experience in diagnosing reading problems and deficiencies of disabled readers, with emphasis on methods of assessing disabled readers, writing reports and lesson plans according to assessed needs, and tutoring.
Prerequisite: READ 390
View Book Information

READ 422  (3-3-0)  Teaching Reading to Culturally Diverse Children: An examination of materials and approaches for teaching reading effectively in a multicultural setting.
View Book Information

READ 441  (3-3-0)  The Psychology of Reading: A study of learning theories related to the process of reading, with emphasis on language development, including linguistic, cognitive, perceptual, and sensory aspects, and the relationship of language development to reading growth and development.
View Book Information

READ 490  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Reading: Analyses of problems, issues, and trends in reading education.
Prerequisite: READ 320
View Book Information

RECR 200  (3-3-0)  Prog Plan-Urban Rec: A course in the development of recreation program activities for all age groups, including consideration of facilities and equipment, group composition, community resources, and leadership techniques, as well as the role of the supervisor in personnel selection, motivation, and evaluation, and in the planning, organization and operation of a comprehensive program.
View Book Information

RECR 203  (3-3-0)  Introduction To Community Recreation: A study of the historical, physiological, social, economic, and philosophical foundations of recreation, with emphasis on the theories, objectives, and principles of public, private and commercial recreation programs.
View Book Information

RECR 300  (3-3-0)  Leadership in Supervised Recreation: Observation of and practical experience in effective supervision of recreation activities and recreation personnel, both professional and volunteer.
View Book Information

RECR 312  (3-3-0)  Organization and Administration in Community Recreation: A study of the administrative practices, organizational structures, principles, and philosophy of community recreation.
Prerequisite: RECR 203
View Book Information

RECR 411  (3-3-0)  Recreational Practice (Internship): An internship experience in recreational practice with public and private agencies.
Prerequisite: RECR 200
View Book Information

RECR 422  (3-3-0)  Camping: An introduction to fundamentals of planning, organizing, and administering camping programs.
View Book Information

RECR 430  (3-3-0)  Therapeutic Recreational Services: A study of recreational activities designed to meet the limitations imposed by handicaps or illnesses.
View Book Information

RECR 431  (3-3-0)  Physical Recreation for the Emotionally Handicapped: An examination of individual and group approaches to physical education for the emotionally disturbed and mentally ill.
View Book Information

RELI 215  (3-3-0)  Introduction to the Bible: A study of important Biblical writings, with special emphasis on the diverse forms of writings in the Bible, the historical contexts in which specific books were produced, and the religious beliefs and values expressed.
View Book Information

RELI 410  (3-3-0)  Soc/Rel: A study of the relationship between religious beliefs and diverse cultural forms, including art, literature, music, politics, and society, with examinations of non-western as well as of western religious traditions.
View Book Information

SOCI 150  (3-3-0)  The Global Society: This introductory course focuses on the global society. Using a variety of techniques, the course introduces students to several of the more pressing global issues and demonstrates their interconnectedness; acquaints students with the main structural features of the global system; equips students to live and work in a globally interdependent world, develops students' ability to work with diverse sets of interest groups on complex issues that cross local and national boundaries; and, by demonstrating the links between global issues and the global society, encourages a recognition of the ethical and social responsibility of global citizenship.
View Book Information

SOCI 210  (3-3-0)  Principles of Sociology: An examination of the basic concepts and principles of sociology, with emphasis on a scientific analysis of culture, personality, social groups and social institutions, social organizations, population trends, and social processes.
View Book Information

SOCI 220  (3-3-0)  Contemporary Social Problems: An analysis of the causes and consequences of current social problems: poverty, urbanization, wars, mental illness, alcoholism, drug addiction, crime and delinquency, environmental concerns, and problems of social institutions.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

SOCI 305  (3-3-0)  Selected Topics in Sociology: Students will examine in-depth a topic of sociological importance chosen by the instructor. Particular attention will be focused on current theoretical and/or methodological explanations of the particular substantive topic. Each student can take up to two different selected topics courses.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 with a C or better or permission of the instructor
View Book Information

SOCI 330  (3-3-0)  Marriage and Family Relations: An analysis of the forms and functions of the family, including changing sex roles, marital choice, procreation, and socialization, with emphasis on the history of American family patterns and the effects of contemporary social changes on the family.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 331  (3-3-0)  Social Statistics: An introduction to techniques for the analysis and interpretation of research data, including descriptive statistics (frequency distributions, centrality, variability and correlation measures) and inferential statistics (sampling theories and tests of statistical hypotheses, including the chi square, t-tests and analysis of variance).
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 And MATH 123 or higher
View Book Information

SOCI 333  (3-3-0)  Introduction to SPSS: An introduction to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, a computer program for data processing and statistical analysis, enabling students without knowledge of programming or without programming aspirations to utilize the computer for scientific research.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 And SOCI 331 Or equivalent Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

SOCI 335  (3-3-0)  Sociological Research Methods: An introduction to the various sociological research methods, with emphasis on research design, questionnaire construction, the construction and use of surveys, uses of available data, methods of collecting and analyzing data, the testing of hypotheses, the drawing of inferences, and the writing of the research report.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 And SOCI 331 Or equivalent
View Book Information

SOCI 340  (3-3-0)  Crime and Delinquency: A study of the nature of crime and delinquency as forms of deviant behavior, including theories of causation relating to both, with considerations of the justice system for each.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 350  (3-3-0)  History of Sociological Thought: A selective and systematic study of major writings in the development of modern sociological thought, with critical examination of the sociological theories of selected writers.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 351  (3-3-0)  Contemporary Social Theory: A study of the major contemporary sociological theories, with critical analyses of the writings of American social theorists.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 360  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Deviant Behavior: A study of the major theories and types of deviant behavior, with critical analyses of society's reactions to such behavior.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 362  (3-3-0)  The Sociology of Religion: A study of the nature of religion, including the societal and cultural dimensions of religion, the role of religion in social change, and the status of religion in contemporary society.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 370  (3-3-0)  The Sociology of The Black Community: A sociological analysis and description of the black community, its socio-historical characteristics, the life styles and socio-cultural patterns within the black community, and the structures and functions of specific social institutions within the black community.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

SOCI 372  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Education: An examination of education as a social institution, the school as a social system, the teacher as an agent of social change, and social programs as complements of programs in education, with emphasis on current social trends, special problems in teaching today, social factors that influence learning, and the role of education in the status attainment process.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 375  (3-3-0)  Comparative Societies: A comparative study of human social life. This course presents students with an overview of the major social, cultural, political, economic, and other organizational differences among human societies and the transformations that have occurred over the millennia. The major theoretical and empirical works in the field are examined.
Prerequisite: ANTH 210 Or SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 380  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Work: A sociological analysis of the division of labor, labor force trends, career patterns and mobility, and occupational cultures and lifestyles.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 390  (3-3-0)  Social Behavior and Interaction: This course provides an analysis of the major scientific propositions, concepts, research methods, and theories developed to explain the behavior of individuals in relation to other individuals, groups, and culture. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between social interaction and the behavior of individuals.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 400  (3-3-0)  The Sociology of Gender Roles: A course examining the social determinants of gender role identity, with emphasis on the relationship between gender role identity and personality, personal and professional relationships, work, religion, and general culture, particularly the culture of the United States.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 410  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Gerontology: An introduction to the field of gerontology, with emphasis on the psychological, biological, and sociological processes of aging.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 412  (3-3-0)  Race and Ethnic Relations: A study of the theories and principles of majority minority relations, with emphasis on the status and problems of selected racial, ethnic, and religious minority groups in the United States and elsewhere.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 422  (3-3-0)  Collective Behavior and Social Movements: A study of human behavior as expressed through group behavior, especially the forces that precipitate change in the social order, such as crowds, mobs, mass behavior, public opinion, social movements, revolutions, and social planning.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 430  (3-3-0)  Demography: A study of the distribution, growth, and characteristics of human populations and their relationship to social organization.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

SOCI 440  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Health: An analysis of the social facets of health and illness, the social functions of health institutions and organizations, the relationship of systems of health care delivery to other social systems, and the social behavior of health personnel and the consumers of health care.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 442  (3-3-0)  Urban Sociology: A study of urbanism as a way of life; the growth and development of urban areas; urban social organization; change and problems of contemporary urban life; ecological patterning; urban planning; and problems of control.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 462  (3-3-0)  Social Stratification: A study of classes, castes, estates, status groups, and social mobility, with an examination of theories of social mobility and a comparison of modes of stratification in selected societies.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 470  (3-3-0)  Social Change: A study of the nature and processes of social change. Topics covered include the theories of social change, industrialization and modernization, planned change, and the social impact of change.
Prerequisite: SOCI 210
View Book Information

SOCI 478  (3-3-0)  Internship in Sociology: This course is for sociology majors who wish to acquire pre-professional and supervised field work experience in an agency or organization in the community while applying sociological knowledge and skills. The course offers students an opportunity to acquire complementary knowledge and skills for future careers and/or graduate school and to build community contacts. Students will be supervised and evaluated jointly by faculty and site supervisors.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SOCI 210 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

SOCI 480  (3-3-0)  Sociological Seminar: Readings and discussions on selected problems and issues in sociology, including the various subdivisions within sociology, with particular attention to the relationship between theory and research and an examination of sociology as a profession.
Prerequisite: Graduating seniors in their last semester And SOCI 210 And SOCI 335 And SOCI 350 And (SOCI 351 Or SOCI 390) And or with SOCI 430
View Book Information

SOCI 491  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: Supervised library and/or field research in sociology on a topic of choice of a student.
View Book Information

SPAN 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary Spanish I: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, with emphasis on the basic language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: Placement test score
View Book Information

SPAN 111  (3-3-0)  Elem Spanish: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, with treatment in greater breadth and depth than in Spanish 110. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experiences.
View Book Information

SPAN 112  (3-3-0)  Spanish for the Professions I: This course is designed to prepare students to use elementary Spanish skills in their profession. Emphasis is given to oral skills, vocabulary to interact with colleagues and customers, and the Hispanic cultural particularities related to the workplace. Laboratory practice is required.
Prerequisite: Placement test score
View Book Information

SPAN 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary Spanish II: A continuation of studies in the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples begun in SPAN 110, including further development of the basic language skills, with special attention to improving oral language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 110 Or placement test scores
View Book Information

SPAN 121  (3-3-0)  Elementary Spanish (Honors) II: A continuation of honors studies in the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples begun in SPAN 111, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on increasing proficiency in oral language skills. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experience.
View Book Information

SPAN 122  (3-3-0)  Spanish for the Professions II: This course is a continuation of the studies begun in SPAN 112 that aim to prepare students to use elementary Spanish skills in their profession. Emphasis is given to oral skills, vocabulary to interact with colleagues and customers, and the Hispanic cultural particularities related to the workplace. Laboratory practice is required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 112 Or placement test scores
View Book Information

SPAN 211  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish: Intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with increased emphasis on reading comprehension and writing in Spanish. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 120 Or placement test scores
View Book Information

SPAN 212  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish II: A continuation of intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on idiomatic usages and complex grammatical structures. Laboratory experience required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 211 Or placement test scores
View Book Information

SPAN 230  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish Conversation: This course will focus on speaking and listening skills and develop pronunciation and conversational skills. Students will review grammar and vocabulary as they explore and discuss Hispanic culture. Class is conducted entirely in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 212 Or placement test scores
View Book Information

SPAN 240  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish Composition: This course reinforces communicative written skills learned in intermediate courses and prepares students for courses at or beyond the 300 level. Readings and written compositions focus on cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. It is conducted entirely in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 212 Or placement test scores
View Book Information

SPAN 300  (3-3-0)  Spanish for Business: An intermediate Spanish course focusing on developing communicative (oral and written) skills applicable to business in Hispanic contexts.
Prerequisite: SPAN 212
View Book Information

SPAN 311  (3-3-0)  Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture: This course is a discussion based course focusing on speaking and listening skills and further development of pronunciation and conversational skills. Students will explore and discuss Hispanic culture and current events in the Spanish-speaking world. Class conducted entirely in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 230 Or challenge examination
View Book Information

SPAN 312  (3-3-0)  is Advanced Spanish Composition and Culture: This course focuses primarily on Spanish composition and the practice of different writing styles through the study of Spanish-speaking cultures. Classroom instruction and discussion will be in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 240 Or challenge examination
View Book Information

SPAN 320  (3-3-0)  Advanced Spanish Grammar: A comprehensive and systematic study of Spanish grammar to develop linguistic (phrase, sentence, paragraph structure) accuracy including correct spelling and utilization of appropriate vocabulary.
View Book Information

SPAN 321  (3-3-0)  Spanish Civilization and Culture: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of Spain, with attention to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture of the Spanish people. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
View Book Information

SPAN 322  (3-3-0)  Spanish-American Civilization and Culture: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of Spanish-America, with attention to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture of Spanish American peoples.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
View Book Information

SPAN 331  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish Literature I: A study of representative Spanish literary works from earliest times to 1700. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 321
View Book Information

SPAN 332  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish Literature II: A study of representative Spanish literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 321
View Book Information

SPAN 341  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish-American Literature I: A survey of Spanish-American literature in the context of historical and social backgrounds, covering the period from colonization to independence. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 322
View Book Information

SPAN 342  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish-American Literature II: A continuation of the survey of Spanish-American literature in the context of historical and social backgrounds, spanning the period from independence to the present. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 322
View Book Information

SPAN 350  (3-3-0)  Study Abroad Project: This course is taken while abroad and expands on cultural aspects related to the host country. This course requires contact hours with faculty and a research project written in Spanish or English.
View Book Information

SPAN 411  (3-3-0)  The Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel: A study of Spanish novels from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including works by Galdos, Pereda, Blasco-lbanez, and Pedro de Alcarcon, with attention to the historical and cultural contexts of the readings. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Or SPAN 332
View Book Information

SPAN 420  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Spanish Linguistics I: Phonetics and Phonology: A descriptive and comparative study of the Spanish language and its varieties in Spain and Latin America focusing on the phonetic and phonological components, while establishing contrasts with respective counterparts in the English language, and related pedagogical implications. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
View Book Information

SPAN 421  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Spanish Linguistics II: Morphology, Syntax and Semantics: A comparative study of the morphological, syntactic, and semantic components of the Spanish language while establishing contrasts with respective counterparts in the English language, and related pedagogical implications. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
View Book Information

SPAN 431  (3-3-0)  Drama of the Golden Age: A study of the works of Spain's leading dramatists of the Golden Age: Lope de Vega, Calderon, Tirso de Molina, and Juan Ruiz de Alarcon. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Or SPAN 332
View Book Information

SPAN 441  (3-3-0)  Cervantes: A study of Cervantes, with analytical reading of Don Quixote and of selected Novelas Ejemplares. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 332 Or SPAN 331
View Book Information

SPAN 451  (3-3-0)  Contemporary Spanish: A study of major literary works in Spanish, from the Generation of 1898 to the present, with attention to literary trends and cultural influences that contributed to the shaping of the literature. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 332 Or SPAN 331
View Book Information

SPAN 461  (3-3-0)  Studies in Latin American Prose Fiction: A study of the developments in Latin American drama and poetry, with emphasis on changes occurring in the literature during the twentieth century. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 342 Or SPAN 341
View Book Information

SPAN 471  (3-3-0)  Studies in Latin American Prose Fiction: A study of representative twentieth century novels and short stories by Latin American writers. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 342 Or SPAN 341
View Book Information

SPAN 481  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Current Issues in the Spanish-Speaking World: Critical analysis of specific current topics including Hispanic culture and/or Spanish literature and/or Spanish linguistics. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Senior status and permission of instructor
View Book Information

SPED 320  (3-3-0)  Education of the Exceptional Child: A survey of the abilities and disabilities and the inter-and intra-individual differences of exceptional children, with emphasis on the impact of educational and psychological handicaps and needs of exceptional children as well as on plans and education programs to facilitate the learning of the exceptional child.
View Book Information

SPED 350  (3-3-0)  Mainstreaming Exceptional Students: A comprehensive introduction to mainstreaming exceptional students, with emphasis on the components and regulations involved in designing an Individual Education Program (IEP) for exceptional students, with opportunities for supervised experiences in the Curriculum Learning Resource Center, and with attention to the development of annual goals, short term objectives, and evaluation methods.
View Book Information

SPED 370  (3-3-0)  Current Development Methods/Exceptional Children: A comprehensive methods course directed to the needs of exceptional students, providing training and teaching methods and materials best suited for each area of mild/moderate exceptionality, with emphasis on the implementation of innovative techniques and materials modifications.
View Book Information

SPED 410  (3-3-0)  Classroom Management Strategies for Exceptional Children: A practical course in the theories and applications of disciplinary practice suitable to exceptional children, with emphasis on the developmental stages of discipline, on the development of the teacher as an effective communicator and problem-solver, and on the implementation of appropriate strategies of classroom management.
View Book Information

SPED 415  (3-3-0)  Read Skills-Student Disability: This course is designed to introduce students to the knowledge, skills, and procedures needed to provide effective instruction for students with disabilities who demonstrate persistent reading difficulties. The course presents research-validated teaching principles, techniques, and strategies that will provide a solid foundation on which to build an effective reading instruction program.
View Book Information

SPED 418  (3-3-0)  Math/Write Skill-Student Disab: This course will examine content of the subjects of mathematics and written language, the difficulties of students with mild to moderate disabilities in the two content areas, and research-based best practices for teaching students with disabilities in mathematics and written language.
View Book Information

SPED 420  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Education of the Emotionally Disturbed: An overview of the education of emotionally disturbed students, with emphasis on the psychological, sociological, and educational implications of their education.
View Book Information

SPED 430  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Education of the Learning Disabled: An introductory course analyzing the inter- and intra-individual differences of the learning disabled, with consideration of theories, identification, procedures, teaching strategies and materials, and developmental processes relative to the education of the learning disabled.
View Book Information

SPED 440  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Education of the Educable Mentally Retarded: An introduction to the study of retarded individuals, including characteristics, behavior, general nature, and needs in the home, the community, and the learning environment, with emphasis on identification procedures, teaching and organizational practices, educational methodology and materials, and prevention, as well as on the psychological, sociological, educational, and medical aspects of mental retardation.
View Book Information

SPED 460  (3-2-1)  Diagnosis and Evaluation of Exceptional Children: A survey of the major tests and inventories used in evaluating exceptional children, focusing on broad developmental and interactional types of measurement, basic statistical concepts, the interpretation of scores and the relationship between information gained from tests and inventories and classroom diagnostics-prescriptive procedures.
Prerequisite: SPED 320
View Book Information

SPED 465  (3-3-0)  Meeting the Instructional Needs of Students with Disabilities: This course presents research-validated methods, techniques, and procedures for teaching students with mild to moderate high incidence disabilities in today's inclusive settings, including such methods as use of learning strategies, scaffolded instruction, direct instruction, peer and cooperative learning, and content enhancements.
Prerequisite: SPED 320
View Book Information

SPED 470  (6-0-6)  Student Teaching in Exceptional Education: This is a supervised basic field experience course requiring a concentrated significant teaching experience in an exceptional children's educational setting with one or more types of Specialty Area students. Offered for variable credits (3-6 credits). For most students, the course is six semester-hour credits and requires ten weeks, 300 clock hours of field experience. Students who are already certified in exceptional children should take a three semester-hour non-student teaching field experience. Students who are already certified in a non-exceptional children's area should take a six semester-hour non-student teaching field experience. Students who are currently lateral entry in Special Education should take a three-semester hour non-student teaching field experience.
Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education and permission of instructor.
View Book Information

SPED 480  (3-3-0)  Seminar II Exceptional Student Field Experience: A clinical field experience with an accompanying seminar for teachers of exceptional students, including observations and tutoring as well as discussions of current issues, problems, and questions related to exceptional students.
View Book Information

SPEE 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Speech: An introduction to the development of effective oral communication through instruction in theory and practice of the principles and skills required in common types of speaking situations. Basic skills in audience analysis, research, organization, outlining, utilizing evidence, reasoning, listening, and verbal/nonverbal expression are developed. Various methods of delivery are examined and practiced.
Prerequisite: ENGL 120 (may be taken concurrently)
View Book Information

STAT 202  (3-3-0)  Basic Probability and Statistics: An introduction to the study of probability and statistical inference.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 126
View Book Information

STAT 301  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Probability: An introduction to the mathematical theory of probability, including such topics as random variables, distributions (normal, binomial, Poisson, and related ones), moment generating functions, and applications of probability theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 241
View Book Information

STAT 302  (3-3-0)  Mathematical Statistics: A study of probability distributions of random samples, the theory of point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, and decision theory concepts.
Prerequisite: STAT 301
View Book Information

STAT 315  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Regression Analysis: A course including such topics as simple linear regression: the error model, algebraic derivation of least square estimators, estimating confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, the ANOVA approach to testing, assessing model validity, transformations, residual plots; multiple regression: the general linear model, least square estimation, prediction, residuals; and Logistic regression.
Prerequisite: STAT 202
View Book Information

STAT 400  (3-3-0)  Applied Statistics: A course incorporating the use of statistical software packages and including discussions of such topics as descriptive statistics, statistical inference, inference from a single sample, samples from two populations, one-way analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, multiple regression, two-way analysis of variance, fixed effects models, factorial designs, and hierarchical or nested design.
View Book Information

STAT 401  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Probability: An intermediate-level study of such topics as conditional probability, basic classical theorems, methods of convergence, central limit theorem, and characteristic functions.
Prerequisite: STAT 301
View Book Information

STAT 402  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Statistics: An intermediate-level course including such topics as the axiomatic treatment of the fundamentals of probability and distribution theory, characteristic functions (random variables, convergence, and approximation), and common distributions.
Prerequisite: STAT 301
View Book Information

STAT 412  (3-3-0)  Operations Research: A review of topics pertaining to deterministic and probabilistic models of operations research, including linear programming, queuing theory, inventory models, and Markov chains.
Prerequisite: STAT 301
View Book Information

STAT 415  (3-3-0)  Applied Time Series Analysis: A study of stationary stochastic processes, auto-regressions and ARMA-processes, parameter estimation and model selection for time series, trends and seasonality, forecasting by exponential smoothing and the Box-Jenkins method, linear filters.
Prerequisite: STAT 301 And STAT 315
View Book Information

STAT 421  (3-3-0)  Quality Control: A study of the construction of control charts for variables, attributes, and tolerances; sampling techniques; and current techniques in quality control methodology.
View Book Information

STAT 422  (3-3-0)  Statistical Methods for Research: A course incorporating the use of statistical software packages for the study of probability distributions, measurements of precision and accuracy, control charts, confidence intervals, tests of significance, analyses of variance, multiple correlation and regression, design and analysis of experiments.
Prerequisite: STAT 400
View Book Information

SWRK 220  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Human Services: This course introduces the theoretical concepts, policies, programs, roles, goals, and historical development of human services. The course examines issues, causes, and solutions to human service problems within the fields of social work, criminal justice, psychology, and sociology with emphasis on human relationship skills fundamental to social work
View Book Information

SWRK 230  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Social Work: This course focuses on the historical development of social welfare, social work and various social services. The course focuses on the nature, causes, and extent of major social problems, and provides examples of how people are affected by such problems. Emphasis is placed on various roles of social workers, the generalist method, cultural competence, ecological and systems theory, the strengths perspective, and responses to the needs of the poor, families, and populations at risk such as the elderly, children, sexual minorities, and people of color. Also addressed are changing trends in society and how they affect social work practice
View Book Information

SWRK 310  (3-3-0)  Statistics for Social Workers: This course introduces students to descriptive and rudimentary inferential statistics for social workers. Emphasis is on understanding and calculations of central tendency measures, measures of dispersion and measures relating to the standard normal distribution. It exposes students to the methods of data collection, graphing and summarizing. Students will review basic statistical methods (Descriptive and Inferential Statistics; Measures of Association), and become familiar with basic parametric and non- parametric techniques. Basic design principles will also be introduced.
Prerequisite: MATH 121 And MATH 123 And SWRK 230 And SWRK 320
View Book Information

SWRK 320  (3-3-0)  Social Work Research Methods: Practice Oriented: This course is designed to prepare students to be effective consumers and producers of research, and to evaluate their own practice. They learn to read, critically evaluate, and use the research of others to select interventions that are based on evidence. Within this process, the following will be covered: the scientific method for building knowledge for social work practice, ethical standards for scientific inquiry, qualitative and quantitative research methodology, research designs for developing knowledge and systematically evaluating social work practice and human service programs, and the review and utilization of research findings.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK230 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 330  (3-3-0)  Human Behavior in the Social Work Environment I: Infancy to Adolescence: This course provides an understanding of the developmental stages of the individual from infancy to adolescence, and the relationship between human growth, human development, and the environment. Knowledge and understanding of biological, psychological, and social systems relationships; cultural norms; and the significance of interaction with the family, group, and the community are stressed.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 335  (3-3-0)  Human Behavior in the Social Work Environment II: Young Adulthood to Old Age: This course provides an understanding of the developmental stages of the individual from young adult to old age, and the relationship between human growth, human development, and the environment. Knowledge and understanding of biological, psychological, and social systems relationships; cultural norms; and the significance of interaction with the family, group, and the community are stressed.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230 And SWRK 330 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 340  (3-3-0)  Social Welfare Policy I: Social Welfare History: This course is the first of a two course policy sequence. This course focuses on social welfare legislation and the policies, programs and services that flow from such legislation. Students analyze social welfare policy within the context of the social and political milieu which spawns social welfare legislation. Policy I identifies how values from social to personal influence the formulation of social welfare policy. Consideration of definitions and theories on poverty is viewed from both the USA and a global perspective. Social and economic justice for people from diverse backgrounds and those who may be oppressed are discussed.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 340  (3-3-0)  Social Welfare Policy I: Social Welfare History: This course is the first of a two course policy sequence. This course focuses on social welfare legislation and the policies, programs and services that flow from such legislation. Students analyze social welfare policy within the context of the social and political milieu which spawns social welfare legislation. Policy I identifies how values from social to personal influence the formulation of social welfare policy. Consideration of definitions and theories on poverty is viewed from both the USA and a global perspective. Social and economic justice for people from diverse backgrounds and those who may be oppressed are discussed.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 350  (3-3-0)  Social Welfare Policy II: Policy Analysis and Evaluation: This course is the second course of the two-course policy sequence and extends the foundation of Social Welfare Policy I by having students apply knowledge obtained from the first policy course regarding rudimentary analysis and begin to employ critical thinking skills to evaluate how policy impacts outcomes for clients. Students develop strategies to achieve social change, and social economic justice for families, groups, and communities. Emphasis is placed on understanding poverty and the various ways in which our society has responded to it over time.
Prerequisite: SWRK 230 And SWRK 340 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 360  (3-3-0)  Generalist Social Work Practice I: This course is one of six in the social work practice and methods sequence. It provides students with beginning level knowledge, skills, and values for generalist social work practice with individuals. Students are provided knowledge of the ecological perspective and systems theory with special focus on the problem-solving process.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 365  (3-3-0)  Intervention and Communication Skills: SWRK 365 introduces students to interviewing, intervention, and communication skills. Students must demonstrate an ability to utilize interviewing and documentation skills in helping relationships with individuals and or families. Students learn by doing through role plays, case scenarios, analysis of taped case presentations, and identifying skills used by master social work interviewers.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 370  (3-3-0)  Generalist Social Work Practice II: This is the second of a three-course sequence on generalist social work practice. The course focuses on theory and practice methods with individuals, families, and small groups.
Prerequisite: SWRK 230 And SWRK 330 And SWRK 340 And SWRK 350 And SWRK 360 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 375  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice with Military Families: This course is designed to develop attention to the military as a central component of the program's mission. The course emphasizes the ecological systems perspective and intervention with military families. Content will focus on the specific needs of military families, the dynamics of the family environment in a transient context, problems encountered, and service needs.
Prerequisite: SWRK 230 And SWRK 330 And SWRK 340 And SWRK 350 And SWRK 360 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 380  (3-3-0)  Health and Social Work: Study of the characteristics of health and medical services in social work. Patterns of service delivery, rural, urban, gender, race and ethnic differences, roles, interventions, and issues related to helping clients in health settings will be addressed.
Prerequisite: Junior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 410  (3-3-0)  Generalist Social Work Practice III: Generalist practice with organizations and communities; this course emphasizes theories and strategies for community organization and community development. Students develop an understanding of the definitions, concepts, and roles of communities and community organizations. Major topics include community based planning, advocacy, governance, and residence participation.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And SWRK 230 And SWRK 330 And SWRK 335 And SWRK 340 And SWRK 350 And SWRK 360 And SWRK 370 And SWRK 375 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 415  (3-3-0)  School Social Work: This course provides an overview of school social work as an area of social work practice. Emphasis is placed upon historical development, policies and legislation affecting school social work practice, problems of school age children, and the role of the school social worker in dealing with these problems.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 420  (3-3-0)  Substance Abuse and Social Work Practice: Social work practice regarding methods for prevention, identification, assessment, treatment, and referral of persons with alcohol and other drug –related problems is discussed.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 425  (3-1-6)  Social Work with Families: This course incorporates the study and analysis of problems and concerns faced by social workers working effectively with families, including the integration of social work policy, human behavior, and social work practice. Issues covered include functions and changes in the family and the theoretical framework of family systems theory and ecological theory.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 435  (2-2-0)  Senior Seminar: This seminar course is a bridge between classroom and field. It is a professional development course and requires students to complete a senior portfolio. Understanding that field education is the signature pedagogy for social work, it is essential that students are prepared for and understand the importance of a successful field experience. This undergraduate field seminar provides the opportunity for students to reflect on the application of theory and classroom learning while adapting professional attitudes and behaviors. The seminar environment is for students to process expected field experiences and their capacity to pursue beginning generalist practice. Students will be expected to engage in in-depth self-examination, be open to new ideas and input from others, and continually evaluate their own knowledge, values, and skills.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing And SWRK 230 And SWRK 330 And SWRK 335 And SWRK 340 And SWRK 350 And SWRK 360 And SWRK 370 And SWRK 375 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 440  (3-3-0)  Social Work with People of Color: This course prepares students for generalist social work practice in a multicultural and global society. Utilizing the strengths and empowerment perspectives, emphasis is placed on defining and developing knowledge and skills for culturally competent social work with people of color.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

SWRK 445  (3-3-0)  Cultural Diversity: This practice course exposes students to knowledge of racial/ethnic groups and to provide skills for effective social work intervention with these groups. Theoretical and practice dimensions of social work with oppressed people are addressed in this course. Students are guided in understanding their own cultural and ethnic heritage, increasing their sensitivity to the ethnic reality of culturally diverse groups in this country, as they prepare to work with diverse populations.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing And SWRK 230 And SWRK 330 And SWRK 335 And SWRK 340 And SWRK 350 And SWRK 360 And SWRK 370 And SWRK 375 And a declared social work major
View Book Information

SWRK 465  (10-10-0)  Block Field Practicum: This is a supervised field practicum experience in an approved social work agency which focuses on the development of beginning competency in the application of theory and skills acquired in the professional foundation courses to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities as a beginning generalist. Professional behavior, demonstration of social work ethics, use of the problem solving process, practical application of interviewing and recording skills, use of community resources and knowledge of the agency's fit in the human service delivery system are highlights of the course. Students spend four days per week in a block practicum for a total of 480 clock hours for the semester.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And approval by the Field Coordinator. Open only to social work majors.
View Book Information

SWRK 470  (3-3-0)  Aging and Social Work: Emphasis on the biological, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of aging and service delivery to elders. Examination of the forces and critical issues that impact elders across the life span will be an emphasis.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of faculty
View Book Information

SWRK 475  (2-2-0)  Integrative Seminar: The purpose of the integrative field seminar is to provide the student a forum for the integration of academic learning within an agency-based field placement. Focus is on the common experiences and concerns of field students in their evolution from student to social work practitioner. The seminar includes discussions on selected topics (both instructor- and student-initiated) and agency and case presentations by students. Seminar students have an opportunity to discuss issues related to their learning experiences in the agency. Through facilitated discussions, students learn about social work practice in various settings and assist each other in seeing the similarities and differences in applying social work knowledge, values, and skills from one setting to another.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And approval by the Field Coordinator. Open only to social work majors.
View Book Information

SWRK 480  (3-3-0)  Child Welfare Services: Social work with children and families. Emphasis on child welfare programs, policies and the development of assessment and case planning skills. Methods of protective services, adoption, and foster care are studied.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of faculty
View Book Information

SWRK 490  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Social Work: Detailed investigation of a topic in social work. Topic and mode of study determined by faculty member.
Prerequisite: Senior standing And SWRK 230
View Book Information

THEA 140  (0-0-1)  Theatre Seminar/ Production Practicum for Non-Majors: Performance laboratories in practical training through participation in departmental activities. Students may enroll for no more than one section in a single semester.
View Book Information

THEA 141  (3-3-0)  Production Practicum: This course provides experience in theatrical production and theatre company operations. Emphasis is on portfolio development by way of production work. Work on FSU Theatre Company productions. Students must be enrolled six semesters for the major or in succession for the remaining semesters, if less than six, for a declared a major. If less than six, the remainder must be made up in free electives.
View Book Information

THEA 203  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Theatre: An introduction to the study of drama and to the art and craft of the theatre, with special attention to the role of the theatre in modern society. Work with FSU Theatre Company productions.
View Book Information

THEA 206  (3-3-0)  Acting I: Fundamentals of Acting: A study of the fundamentals and techniques of acting, including creative techniques in scene study from representative plays of the past and present. Work with FSU Theatre Company productions is required.
Prerequisite: THEA 203 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 216  (3-2-2)  Introduction to Costume and Make-up: An introduction to the study of historical costumes and theatrical make-up, with applications to stage productions. Work with the FSU Theatre Company.
Prerequisite: THEA 203 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 230  (3-3-0)  Script Analysis: A study of the play, from page to stage, with emphasis on critical analysis of structure, genre, theme, style, character, language, dramatic event, and point of view of the actor, director, critic, and audience; an introduction to theatre research methods.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 236  (3-1-4)  Stagecraft: A study of the theory and practice of stage production and design, scene construction and painting. Includes lectures, demonstrations, and practical experience by involvement with the FSU Theatre Company.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 237  (3-1-4)  Scene Technology: For stage and studio. Basic theory and practice of scenery and lighting technology for both stage and film/video studio. Lectures and demonstrations are supplemented with practical experience by involvement with the FSU Theatre Company and the Telecommunication Center.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 238  (3-3-4)  Stage Movement: Designed to acquaint students with forms of nonverbal communication and specialized physical activity in theatrical periods and styles. The course includes an analysis of personal body use, studies of theories and techniques of movement designed to improve an actor's physical expressiveness, as well as movement skills such as stage combat, tumbling, period physical styles, and techniques including mask and mime work, yoga, and dance, as well as Alexander, Laban and LeCoq approaches to movement.
Prerequisite: THEA 206
View Book Information

THEA 242  (3-3-0)  Contemporary World Drama: This course introduces students to the literary study of world drama, with particular emphasis on gender and culture. Selected plays from various regions of the world are read (in English translation) with an emphasis on understanding diverse theatrical conventions and how drama expresses and challenges values, ideas, and traditions of a given culture.
View Book Information

THEA 260  (2-1-3)  Performance Laboratory: Designed as a practical lab in improvisation and performance, this course may be taken once per semester up to six times. Credit is offered for participation in the FSU Touring Company, whose principal objectives involve refining drama learning processes through performances made available to the county public schools. Offered each fall and spring. Conditions for admittance into the performance company based upon audition and/or instructor approval.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 301  (0-0-1)  Theatre Seminar: Performance laboratories in practical training through participation in departmental activities. Students may enroll for no more than one section in a single semester.
View Book Information

THEA 302  (3-3-0)  History of Theatre I: An historical survey of the development of the theatre from its origins to 1650, including studies of representative dramas in their cultural contexts, with analyses of the audiences, actors, and patrons; physical conditions and architecture; and the relationship of the theatre to the other arts.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 303  (3-3-0)  History of Theatre II: A continuation of the history of theatre from 1650 to the present.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 305  (3-3-0)  Principles of Design: A study of the history, elements, principles, and functions of design and how they apply to specific design disciplines. Work with the FSU Theatre Company.
Prerequisite: THEA 237 Or consent of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 310  (3-3-0)  Acting for the Media: Instructions and practice in the basics of acting for TV and film; playing to the camera, shooting out of sequence, blocking, and other production considerations. The business of film/TV acting will be explored to define the necessary adjustments of one's acting styles to be a successful actor on camera.
Prerequisite: THEA 203 And THEA 206
View Book Information

THEA 311  (3-3-0)  Oral Interpretation: A study of the principles and techniques required to becoming proficient as an interpretative artist, with special emphasis on interpretations of prose, poetry, and drama, and on preparations for interpretative reading contests and other events.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 315  (3-1-4)  Acting II: Intermediate Acting: Training and practice beyond basic skills learned in a fundamental acting course designed to give practice in applying basic techniques to a more advanced level of performance. Participation with FSU Theatre Company productions is required.
Prerequisite: THEA 206 Or consent of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 320  (3-3-2)  Playwriting: Writing for the stage, including plot construction and character development, and the adaptation of playwriting to other media, with particular attention given to television.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 333  (3-2-2)  Play Directing: A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of play directing, including composition, picturization, movement, rhythm, and pantomimic dramatization, with additional attention to script analysis, casting, rehearsing, and relationships of the director to other theatre practitioners. Work with the FSU Theatre Company.
Prerequisite: THEA 203 And THEA 206
View Book Information

THEA 347  (3-3-1)  Lighting Design and Technology: This course is an applied study of theatre lighting and is designed to train theatre designers and technicians. Emphasis is placed on design and technology, including the mechanics of lighting and lighting control equipment. Work with FSU Theatre Company.
Prerequisite: THEA 337 or instructor consent
View Book Information

THEA 349  (3-3-0)  Devised Theatre: This course is an applied exploration in devised theatre for the stage, culminating in public and/or individual performances. Emphasis on ensemble work.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
View Book Information

THEA 350  (3-3-0)  Shakespeare Studio: This course is an applied exploration in Shakespeare for the stage, culminating in public Shakespeare performances. Emphasis on verse, text, performance, and staging practice.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval
View Book Information

THEA 402  (3-1-4)  Acting III: Period and Styles: A study of periods, styles, and techniques in advanced acting, including creative techniques in scene study from representative plays, specific historical periods, and styles of acting. Areas to be explored include physical characterization, tactical interplay, warming up, and relaxation techniques using Linklater, Rolf, and Alexander techniques to promote physical dexterity as well as vocal strength and flexibility. Work with FSU Theatre Company productions is required.
Prerequisite: THEA 315 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 403  (3-2-2)  Stage Design: History and principles of designing the environment for stage and studio productions. Work with the FSU Theatre Company and TV studio productions where applicable.
Prerequisite: THEA 237 And THEA 305
View Book Information

THEA 404  (3-3-0)  CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) for the Stage: A study of the fundamental principles and application of 3-D design utilizing a DOS based drafting and design program. Special attention will be given to the basic concepts and techniques that can be directly applied to theatrical drafting.
Prerequisite: THEA 237 Or permission of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 411  (3-3-0)  Children's Theatre for School and Community: A study of materials, procedures, and exercises for creative dramatics, choral speaking, puppetry, and formal dramatics. Recommended for prospective and in-service teachers on the elementary level and for community workers with children.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 413  (3-3-0)  Drama Theory and Criticism I: A survey of European theories of the drama and the effect of these theories on criticism, dramaturgy, and production from the classical Greek period through the French Academy.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 414  (3-3-0)  Drama Theory Criticism II: A continuation of THEA 413, beginning with the eighteenth century. Study of the impact that these theories have on criticism, dramaturgy, production, and acting.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 415  (3-3-0)  Theatre Management: A study of the tools of theatre management, with emphasis on box office management, promotion costs, and the responsibilities of production staff. Promotion work with the FSU Theatre Company productions.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 420  (3-3-0)  African American Theatre: A study of the theory and practice of African American Theatre, focusing on its evolution as well as the contemporary African American Theatre.
Prerequisite: THEA 203
View Book Information

THEA 421  (3-0-6)  Play Production: A seminar and laboratory in directing plays, with special emphasis on each student's directing a one-act play for public presentation.
Prerequisite: THEA 333 And permission of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 430  (3-0-6)  Theatre Internship: Practical work experience in selected area in conjunction with professional theatre companies. Available to advanced theatre majors or students in special programs as juniors or seniors who have strongly demonstrated the ability to work independently.
Prerequisite: THEA 203 And THEA 206 And THEA 237 And permission of instructor
View Book Information

THEA 450  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: A study of selected topics in speech and theatre, with completion of a major research and/or production project required.
Prerequisite: Senior standing
View Book Information

THEA 495  (1-0-0)  Special Topics in Theatre: A seminar to demonstrate student proficiency in an area of theatre research agreed upon by the student and the instructor. Topics may come from any area of theatre studies or be combined with production work, but the project must result in a 10-15 page research paper with supporting bibliography. Offered for variable credits (1-6). Prerequisite(s) vary depending on the seminar and instructor.
View Book Information

UNIV 101  (1-0-1)  Freshman Seminar I: The first half of a year-long, interdisciplinary introduction to the university experience, including university history, policies, and resources; reading and study skills; use of electronic mail and the Internet; academic and career planning; money management; and discussions of selected topics in literature, science, business, education, politics, economics, and philosophy. Based on profile examination scores, students may be required to complete additional work in the Reading Laboratory.
View Book Information

UNIV 102  (1-0-3)  Freshman Seminar II: The second half of a year-long, interdisciplinary introduction to the university experience, including university history, policies, and resources; reading and study skills; use of electronic mail and the Internet, academic and career planning; money management; and discussions of selected topics in literature, science, business, education, politics, economics, philosophy, and other topics. Based on profile examination scores, students may be required to complete additional work in the Reading Laboratory.
View Book Information

UNIV 110  (2-0-2)  University Studies: An interdisciplinary introduction to the university experience, with emphasis on reading, discussions, and critical assessments of selected topics in literature, science, business, education, politics, economics, and philosophy. Students are introduced to FSU history, policies, procedures, resources, and support services. This course is required of transfer students who enter the university with fewer than 30 transfer credits.
View Book Information

UNIV 111  (2-2-0)  University Studies for Student Success: An interdisciplinary introduction to the university experience, with emphasis on essential skills such as reading, discussions, note taking, test taking, studying, writing, and researching. Through self-assessment, articles, guided journals, and critical thinking of selected topics in literature, science, business, education, politics, economics, and philosophy, this course will help students make the transition into a university culture, become active learners, and make intelligent choices—academically, personally, and professionally. Students are introduced to FSU policies, procedures, resources, and support services. This course is required for students in academic difficulty.
View Book Information

YORU 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary Yoruba I: The course is an introduction to Yoruba, and is intended for students with no prior knowledge of the language and culture of Yorubaland. It is designed to introduce the learner to the fundamentals of Yoruba ┐ the language, the culture, and the people. The course emphasizes spoken and written Yoruba, as used in present day West Africa.
View Book Information

YORU 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary Yoruba II: A continuation of YORU 110. The course covers materials beyond the elementary ones included in YORU 110. The course emphasizes contemporary spoken and written Yoruba, as used in present day West Africa.
Prerequisite: YORU 110
View Book Information

ZOOL 200  (4-3-2)  General Zoology: A study of concepts of animal biology relative to structure, function, ecology, heredity, and embryogenesis, with emphasis on the evolution and characteristics of major animal phyla, and with two (2) hours of laboratory studies relative to basic concepts of animal biology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And BIOL 160
View Book Information

ZOOL 210  (4-3-2)  Anatomy and Physiology I: A systematic study of the structures and functions of musculoskeletal, neural, and integumentary systems of the human body, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies on the structures and functions of the human body's composite systems.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150
View Book Information

ZOOL 230  (4-3-2)  Anatomy and Physiology II: A systematic study of the structures and functions of the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems of the human body, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies on the structure and function of the human body's composite systems.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 210
View Book Information

ZOOL 310  (3-2-2)  Principles of Genetics: A study of the fundamental concepts and principles of Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and the application of genetic technologies, with two hour laboratory experiments and exercises designed to reinforce and deepen students’ understanding of basic concepts and principles of genetics and to provide an opportunity to obtain hands-on experimental and problem solving skills.
Prerequisite: BOTN 210 And ZOOL 200
View Book Information

ZOOL 350  (3-2-2)  Comparative Anatomy: A comprehensive study of the anatomy of chordates, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of anatomical systems of representative chordates.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
View Book Information

ZOOL 370  (3-3-2)  Vertebrate Physiology: A study of the functions and functional relationships of organs and organ systems of vertebrates, especially humans, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of an introduction to laboratory techniques used for studying the physiology of vertebrates.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
View Book Information

ZOOL 430  (4-3-2)  Animal Development: A study of principles of animal development, including cellular and tissue assembly, embryogenesis, and reconstitutive development, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of descriptive and experimental studies of the development of representative vertebrate embryos.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 370
View Book Information

ZOOL 450  (3-2-2)  Histology and Microtechniques: A study of the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs, embracing both morphological and physiological aspects of normal human structures, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of a introduction to histological techniques employing the use of permanently fixed and stained slides and to the preparation of tissues in a manner suitable for viewing with a compound microscope.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 370
View Book Information

ZOOL 470  (3-2-2)  Introduction to Entomology: A study of the evolution, anatomy, development, ecology, and systematics of insects, the role of insects as vectors of diseases; and the influences of insects on history and culture, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies in insect physiology, morphology, ecology, and behavior, and with an assigned project on the identification of local insects.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 200
View Book Information

ZOOL 485  (3-2-2)  Introduction to Parasitology: A study of the biology of parasites, their host relationships, and their importance to humankind, unicellular and multicellular parasites of human being and other animals, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies involving including both unicellular and multicellular parasites of human beings and other animals.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 200
View Book Information

Fayetteville State University1200 Murchison Road • Fayetteville, NC 28301 • 910.672.1111
Copyright © • A Constituent Institution of The University of North CarolinaContact Us