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Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015

CatalogUndergraduateCollege of Arts and SciencesGOVTCourse Descriptions

Government and History Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

FSCN 322  (3-3-0)  Fire Investigations: A course intended to provide the student with advanced technical knowledge on rules of law, fire scene analysis, fire behavior, evidence collection and preservation, scene documentation, case preparation and testifying. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 345  (2-2-0)  Firefighter Fitness and Wellness: This course is applied in nature and is directed at enhancing the physical and mental health of the participant through the application and understanding of the cardio-muscular fitness requirements of the modern firefighter. It also provides an overview of the ramifications of emergency worker stress and potential coping strategies that can be utilized to cope with work induced stress. This course will enable the participant to design a personal and/or work-team fitness regime. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 350  (3-3-0)  Fire Prevention Organization and Management: This course examines the factors that shape fire risk and the tools for fire prevention, including risk reduction education; codes and standards; inspection and plans review; fire investigation; research; master planning; various types of influences; and strategies. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration Majors only.
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FSCN 360  (3-3-0)  Applied Fire Service Ethics: Ethics in the provision of fire, rescue, and emergency medical services are challenging and complex. No other government services are granted the same degree of public trust. This course increases student proficiency in making ethical decisions in the provision of emergency service. Students will discover how to consider problems in terms of their ethical implications. Students will also learn a model for making ethical decisions. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 377  (3-3-0)  Fire-Related Human Behavior: An exploration of the dynamics of human behavior in fire incidents. The functions and implementation of prevention practices, program, codes, and ordinances are stressed. The concepts of risk, personal invulnerability, role, and group dynamics are examined in relation to design aspects of buildings and mitigation of the effects of fire on modern society. Discussion deals with proper ways of conducting post-fire interviews and emphasizes the psychological effects of communications during emergencies. Open to Fire and Emergency Servijces Administration majors only.
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FSCN 390  (3-3-0)  Fire Dynamics: This course is an examination of the dynamics within the context of firefighting and its application to fire situations. Course includes the examination of fire, including combustion, flame spread, flashover, and smoke movement; applications to building codes; large-loss fires; and fire modeling through a consideration of the physics and chemistry of fire and combustion. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 400  (3-3-0)  Political and Legal Foundations of Fire Protection: An examination of the legal, political, and social aspects of the government's role in public safety, including the American legal system, fire department operations, employment and personnel issues, fire officials' roles, and legislative and political influence. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 402  (3-3-0)  Managerial Issues in an All Hazards Environment: This course examines regulatory issues, hazard analysis, multiagency contingency planning, response personnel, multiagency response resources, agency policies, procedures and implementation, public education and emergency information systems, health and safety, command post dynamics, strategic and tactical considerations, recovery and termination procedures, and program evaluation. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 412  (3-3-0)  Advanced Fire Administration: This course examines organizational and leadership tools for fire service administrators, including community approaches to administration, core skills, planning and implementation, leading change, and community management. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 421  (3-3-0)  Incendiary Fire Analysis and Investigation: This course examines technical, investigative, legal, and managerial approaches to the arson problem, including principles of incendiary fire analysis and detection, environmental and psychological factors of arson, gang-related arson, legal considerations and trial preparations, managing the fire investigation unit, intervention and mitigation strategies, and shaping the future. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
Prerequisite: FSCN 322 Or permission of program director
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FSCN 422  (3-3-0)  Applications of Fire Research: An examination of the rationale for conducting fire research, various fire protection research activities, and research applications, including fire test standards and codes, structural fire safety, automatic detection and suppression, life safety, and firefighter health and safety. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 430  (3-3-0)  Fire Service Personnel Administration: Basic and advanced concepts and processes of designing, implementing, and administering the personnel functions of fire service organizations. Emphasis is placed on human resource planning, job classification, job analysis, equal opportunity organizations and resources, affirmative action, recruitment, retention, development, performance evaluation, and assessment centers. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 440  (3-3-0)  Fire Service Organizational Dynamics: An exploration and examination of organizational dynamics, including organization culture as it applies to the American fire service. Knowledge gained through this course will assist the fire service administrator in solving complex organizational challenges. The focus will be on the many varieties of theories about public organizations; the consideration of the relationship between theory and practice; and the development of a coherent, integrated understanding of fire service organizations. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 441  (3-3-0)  Topics in Fire Department Management: A course designed to cover contemporary topics of interest in the area of fire department administration. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 455  (3-3-0)  Community Risk Reduction for Fire and Emergency Services: This course provides a theoretical framework for the understanding of the ethical, social, organizational, political, and legal components of community risk reduction, as well as a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk reduction plan. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
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FSCN 490  (6-0-0)  Fire Service Internship: An experience that offers an opportunity to apply content learned in the classroom to complete a project in management or investigation in the workplace. Open to Fire and Emergency Services Administration majors only.
Prerequisite: Completion of a majority of Core Curriculum requirements and permission of program director.
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GEOG 110  (2-2-0)  Environmental Literacy: An introductory course on the impact human beings have on the environment as well as the basic relationship between our environment and environmental policy. The course will discuss local, regional, and global environmental issues such as food resources, water resources, and energy resources. The focus will be on the transition to university life and campus resources that support sustainability for students as members of the campus community.
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GEOG 210  (3-3-0)  Principles of Geography: An introductory study of the physical and cultural elements of the surface of the earth, emphasizing the geographic relationships and surveying the interaction between human beings and their physical environment.
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GEOG 220  (3-3-0)  World Regional Geography: A geographical study of the world by realms or regions and of the basic relationship between the physical and cultural elements within the major realms of the world, with a detailed study of some selected regions.
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GEOG 250  (3-3-0)  Basic Map Reading: An introductory map-reading course, with emphasis on map interpretation techniques and on the most commonly used types of maps and their interpretations.
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GEOG 260  (3-3-0)  Population Geography: A study of the patterns of population distribution on the surface of the earth, emphasizing patterns of population growth, density, and movement and alterations related to changes in selected socioeconomic and cultural phenomena.
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GEOG 270  (3-3-0)  Human Beings and the Environment: An examination of the interaction between human beings and the environment on the surface of the earth, with attention to specific types of ecosystem degradation and to solutions of resulting problems.
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GEOG 300  (3-3-0)  Medical Geography: The geographic study of human ecology and health on the surface of the earth, with an analytical study of the world patterns of disease distribution and their cultural/environmental interactions, as well as alterations of disease patterns because of developments in various cultures.
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GEOG 310  (3-3-0)  Economic Geography: A geographic analysis of the distribution of economic activities on the surface of the earth, with emphasis on present-day patterns and trends of production, distribution, and utilization of the world's major commodities.
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GEOG 311  (3-3-0)  Cartography: A study of principles and techniques of constructing maps and other graphic devices, emphasizing the construction of map projections and their uses, problems of scales, the interpretation of contour maps, lettering and sketching techniques, and graphic presentation of statistical materials.
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GEOG 312  (3-3-0)  Advanced Cartography: A study of advanced principles and techniques of map and graphic construction and interpretation.
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GEOG 313  (3-3-0)  Aerial Photo Interpretation: A study of the basic principles of aerial photographic mapping and the interpretation of aerial photos in terms of both physical and cultural/human geography, with emphasis on detecting and identifying the natural/physical and human/cultural elements of the geographic complex on the surface of the earth from the perspective of space.
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GEOG 314  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Remote Sensing: An introductory study of remote sensing, emphasizing its application to environmental and land use analyses of the earth.
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GEOG 316  (3-3-0)  Computer Cartography: An introduction to the cartographical uses of computers and computer graphics, with emphasis on applications of computer mapping to geographic phenomena and problems.
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GEOG 317  (3-3-0)  Computer Techniques in Geography: A course emphasizing computer usage and techniques applicable to studies of the geographical phenomena on the surface of the earth and to the study of geography as an academic subject.
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GEOG 320  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Geographic Information Systems: An introductory course covering the theory and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) This course includes an overview of general principles of GIS and practical experience in its use.
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GEOG 321  (3-3-0)  Geography of the Soviet Union: A study of the physical features, natural resources, population distribution, and human/cultural geography of the Soviet Union across time.
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GEOG 322  (3-3-0)  Geography of Latin America: A regional study of the physical environmental conditions, natural resources, economic development, and social and political conditions of Latin American countries.
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GEOG 325  (3-3-0)  Applied Geographic Information Systems: Students will learn to apply geospatial technologies, particularly GIS, to real world problems by creating detailed maps and interpreting relationships based on space (connectivity, containment, etc.). Students will work with advanced concepts such as tools, behavior, and scripting and symbol creation and apply the results to spatial problems.
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GEOG 330  (3-3-0)  Geography of Africa: A geographic study of the continent of Africa, with differentiating descriptions of its countries and regions, its distinctive character in comparison with other continents, and its current problems and developments.
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GEOG 340  (3-3-0)  Cultural Geography: An examination of human experience as it occurs in different natural settings, with analyses of symbolic and material elements of culture, focusing on those areas with landscape and environment manifestations and using specific case studies to determine how processes such as innovation, diffusion, and cultural change function.
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GEOG 350  (3-3-0)  Physical Geography: An examination of the physical systems and features of the earth, with emphasis on detailed analyses of systematic functions and interrelations of the geophysical processes of the earth's physical/natural environment.
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GEOG 360  (3-3-0)  Climates: A study of world climatic patterns with emphasis on the classification and distribution of various types of climates on the surface of the earth and their influence on human beings.
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GEOG 370  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Meteorology: An introductory study of the atmospheric phenomena of weather, emphasizing analyses of the weather elements, weather production processes, and techniques of weather forecasting.
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GEOG 400  (3-3-0)  Introduction to City and Regional Planning: A study of the principles, concepts, and reality of city and regional planning from the past to the present, with emphasis on urbanization and planning, and on analyses of current urban problems and forces responsible for urban and regional growth.
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GEOG 411  (3-3-0)  Industrial Geography: A study of manufacturing regions and major industries of leading industrial nations of the world, with attention to factors relating to the nature, location, and development of manufacturing industries.
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GEOG 412  (3-3-0)  Ecology: A geographic study of the ecological system of the earth and the relationship of earth's organisms to their environment, with special attention to the effects of human activities on the ecosystem.
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GEOG 420  (3-3-0)  Conservation of Natural Resources: A study of conservation practices related to natural resources of the earth, emphasizing techniques for preserving the earth's waters, soils, forests, grasslands, animals, and human resources.
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GEOG 421  (3-3-0)  Geography of the South: An analytical study of the physical, historical, economic, social and cultural environment of the present day southern United States, acquainting students with the geography of the South and with the distinctive and changing character of the South.
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GEOG 430  (3-3-0)  Geomorphology: An examination of the geomorphological processes and factors creating and affecting the development of the natural landscape of the earth.
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GEOG 431  (3-3-0)  Political Geography: A study of the geographical nature of political states, emphasizing their organization, power, and boundaries, and the geographic influences on their internal and external relations, with additional attention to concepts of geopolitics and associated contemporary problems.
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GEOG 440  (3-3-0)  Urban Geography: A geographical survey of the internal and external spatial relationships of cities and city systems, with special emphasis on patterns of growth, distribution, and functioning within and among cities in various parts of the world, particularly in the United States.
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GEOG 480  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Geography: Research in geographic thought and concepts and their practical applications, with emphasis on quantitative and empirical analyses of some specific problems of physical and cultural/human elements of the earth's environment from perspectives of geographic research.
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GEOG 490  (3-3-0)  Geography Internship: The internship offers students the ability to apply subject matter learned in the classroom to real world settings. Students gain experience in the workforce and can use the skills acquired in this course in future employment opportunities.
Prerequisite: GEOG 320 Or Permission of instructor
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HIPO 300  (3-3-0)  Contemporary African American Politics: A study of selected issues related to African-Americans living in America, with emphasis on contemporary political organizations and activities of African-Americans.
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HIPO 310  (3-3-0)  Political History of Contemporary China: A study of political development in China from the Revolution of 1911 through the consolidation of power by Mao Tse-tung in the postwar period and continued through successive leaders to the present.
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HIPO 341  (3-3-0)  Constitutional Law and History: A study of basic principles of the constitutional system, with particular emphasis upon cases that deal with the framework of the American federal system.
Prerequisite: POLI 210
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HIPO 342  (3-3-0)  Civil Rights and Constitution: A study of constitutional principles and their applications as they affect individual civil rights.
Prerequisite: POLI 210
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HIPO 440  (3-3-0)  Modern Ideologies: A study of the principal modern political ideologies: capitalism, communism, fascism, and socialism.
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HIST 100  (3-3-0)  Social Institutions: An historical survey of the development of the basic social institutions such as family, religion, politics, economics, the arts, and education presented as a case study of the African-American experience from past civilizations in Africa to contemporary American society.
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HIST 110  (3-3-0)  World History to 1600: An historical survey of the development of civilizations in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas from their beginnings to 1600, with attention to the governmental, social, religious, economic, political, intellectual, and aesthetic movements and activities that contributed to their development. Offered every semester.
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HIST 120  (3-3-0)  World History since 1600: An historical survey tracing the continuing development of civilization from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present day, with attention to the governmental, social, religious, economic, political, intellectual, and aesthetic movements and activities that contributed to their development, with special consideration of the movements, ideologies, revolutions, and wars that helped to shape modern history. Offered every semester.
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HIST 210  (3-3-0)  African-American History: A study of African-American social, economic, cultural and political history, with emphasis on the contributions of African-Americans to the social, cultural, economic, and intellectual life of American society and with attention to the role of African-Americans in the exploration, settlement, and development of America, the experience of slavery, and the struggle for civil rights. Offered every semester.
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HIST 211  (3-3-0)  The United States to 1865: A survey of American history from the colonial period through the Civil War. Offered every semester.
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HIST 212  (3-3-0)  The United States since 1865: A survey of American history from the era of Reconstruction to the present. Offered every semester.
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HIST 270  (3-3-0)  An Introduction to Africa in the World: This course seeks to explore the distinguishing features of the peoples and topography of Africa. Moreover, efforts will be made to assay the interactions of these peoples with the outside world in a way that will reveal the truth about them rather than to recycle myths and prejudices.
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HIST 301  (3-3-0)  The Era of Civil War and Reconstruction: A study of the War Between the States, with an examination of the forces that led to the outbreak of the conflict between North and South, the ramifications of the Union victory, and the problems of reconstruction following the war.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 302  (3-3-0)  Modern America 1914 to Present: A study of the United States as a modern industrial nation and as a world power, particularly since 1945.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 311  (3-3-0)  Early Modern European History, 1600-1789: A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Europe from the late Reformation to the outbreak of the French Revolution.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 312  (3-3-0)  Modern European History, 1789 to the Present: A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Europe from the French Revolution to the present.
Prerequisite: HIST 311
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HIST 321  (3-3-0)  American Social History: A study of the daily life, institutions, intellectual developments, and artistic achievements in America from the Agrarian Era, 1607-1861, through the Urban Industrial Era, 1861 to the present.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 322  (3-3-0)  Ethnic Minorities in American Urban History: A study of the impact of urban life on the history of minority groups in the United States, with special emphasis on the relationships between the urban social order, the condition of minority groups since 1900, and the contributions of minority groups to the American city.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 323  (3-3-0)  Oral History: A study of basic oral history techniques, including interviewing, transcribing, and writing a narrative based on the materials produced.
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HIST 331  (3-3-0)  History of Modern East Asia: A study of modern China from the decline of the Manchu Dynasty in the mid-nineteenth century through the events of Tienanmen Square, and of modern Japan from the Meiji Restoration through its post-World War II development as a leading industrial nation.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 340  (3-3-0)  American Diplomatic History: A study of American diplomacy from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on U.S. foreign relations in the twentieth century. Offered on request.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 350  (3-3-0)  History of Latin America: A study of the political, economic, and social institutions and problems of contemporary Latin American nations.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 351  (3-3-0)  Ancient History: A study of the origins, development, and contributions of the ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman civilizations, through the fall of the Roman Empire.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 352  (3-3-0)  North Africa and the Middle East: A study of Islamic civilization and culture in areas of the southern and eastern rims of the Mediterranean Sea spanning the time period from the seventeenth century to the present day.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 353  (3-3-0)  History of Mexico: An introduction to the social, cultural, economic, and political history of Mexico, primarily since independence (1808), with a background on the colonial and Pre- Colombian periods.
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HIST 362  (3-3-0)  American Military Experience: The evolution of the American military profession from colonial times to the post-World War II era, with attention to such topics as American military concepts, strategies tactics, doctrines, and technology, and the influence of military experience on American society.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 370  (3-3-0)  Africa South of the Sahara: A study of ancient, medieval, colonial, and modern civilizations and nations in sub-Saharan Africa, with attention to issues relating to African heritage and to the rise of contemporary African nations and cultures.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 371  (3-3-0)  Renaissance and Reformation: A study of the rise of individualism and humanistic thought after 1300, the fragmentation of religious and political authority in Europe, the Reformation, and the religious wars through the Treaty of Westphalia.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 372  (3-3-0)  History of Women in the Western World: A survey of the changes in the status of women in Western society from ancient to contemporary times, with special attention given to intergroup differences and to minority women.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 375  (3-3-0)  Women In Africa: This course explores women's history by region as it has changed over time under pre-colonial, colonial, and independence governments. Topics include customs of female circumcision, bride wealth, and multiple wives; changes in the control over women's labor and women's roles in politics; and in the effect of structural adjustment on women.
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HIST 380  (3-3-0)  Medieval Europe: A study of Europe from the fourth through the fourteenth centuries, with special emphasis on the characteristics of medieval political organization and socioeconomic life, the formative influence of the Church, and the cultural legacy of the Middle Ages.
Prerequisite: HIST 110 And HIST 120
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HIST 390  (3-3-0)  North Carolina History: A study of the history of the Tar Heel state from its origins to the present. Offered every year.
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HIST 400  (3-3-0)  History of the South: A study of the development of the southern United States since 1820, with special emphasis on race relations and on industrial growth in the region in the mid-twentieth century.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 410  (3-3-0)  Survey of American Urban History: A study of the forces that have shaped the development of the American city from the colonial era to the present time, with special attention given to the social, economic, political, and cultural effects of urban life on city dwellers.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 430  (3-3-0)  Twentieth Century Europe: A study of contemporary European issues originating from the two world wars, including the social and political upheavals of the twentieth century, with emphasis on the role of eastern Europe in the decade of the 1990┐s.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
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HIST 431  (3-3-0)  Russia to 1917: A study of politics and society in Imperial Russia and the collapse of the empire in the Revolution of 1917.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
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HIST 432  (3-3-0)  History of the Soviet Union: A study of the Soviet system and Soviet foreign policy from the Revolution of 1917 through its collapse in 1989.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
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HIST 441  (3-3-0)  History of England: A study of the development of modern England from the English Revolution to the present, with emphasis on the rise and fall of the British empire and the evolution of the Parliamentary system.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
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HIST 442  (3-3-0)  History of Modern Germany: A study of German history through five periods: before unification (1815-1870), under Bismarck, under Wilhelm II, between the wars, and since 1945.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
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HIST 450  (3-3-0)  History of Terrorism and Insurgency: A study of the terrorism phenomenon throughout history, culminating in the present threat posed by transnational terrorism. Special attention is given to subjects including: different forms of historical terrorism, such as political and religious; asymmetrical warfare; the terrorism-media relationship; and anti- and counter- terrorism.
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HIST 451  (3-3-0)  French Revolution and Napoleon: A study of the collapse of the Ancient Regime, including an examination of the causes and effects of its demise; Napoleon's attempt to establish a new order in Europe under French hegemony; the Congress of Vienna.
Prerequisite: HIST 311
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HIST 460  (3-3-0)  Problems in American History: A study of selected issues in American history.
Prerequisite: HIST 211 And HIST 212
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HIST 470  (3-3-0)  Colonialism and Neo-Colonialism: A study of the political, economic, and strategic interests of the Great Powers in colonies and former colonial possessions during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312 And HIST 331 Or HIST 370
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HIST 480  (3-3-0)  Problems in European History: A study of selected problems and issues in the history of Europe.
Prerequisite: HIST 311 And HIST 312
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HIST 490  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Selected Topics: In-depth studies in selected areas of special interest, with supervised research and directed readings required. (For History or Social Science majors and minors.)
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HIST 491  (3-3-0)  Methods of Historical Research: An introduction to conventional methods of historical research and to new techniques in oral history, family history, and quantitative history. For History or Social Science majors and minors.
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INTL 200  (3-3-0)  Intelligence and National Security: This course focuses on the concept, framework and applications of U.S. Intelligence and its role in the creation and implementation of national security policies.
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INTL 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Intelligence Analysis: Research, Methods and Writing: This specialized course concentrates on the analytical production of strategic intelligence and serves as an introduction to the craft of intelligence analysis.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 220  (3-3-0)  Intelligence Operations: This course covers human Intelligence (HUMINT), covert action and counterintelligence, as well as, the organizations, missions, and functions of international intelligence and security services.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 300  (3-3-0)  Law Enforcement Intelligence: This course examines the role of Intelligence in the production of public policy and Law Enforcement implementation.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 310  (3-3-0)  Corporate Intelligence: This course combines the study of traditional “corporate espionage” with the intelligence and counter-intelligence requirements inherent in protecting and managing intellectual property and national security information found in the industrial sector.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 320  (3-3-0)  Intelligence and Military Operations: This course introduces the principles of Intelligence support for military operations including definitions and problems of strategic, operational and tactical intelligence; various aspects of military operations; and significant past, present and future events, operations and implications involving intelligence and military operations.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 330  (3-3-0)  The History of Intelligence: This course explores the principles of the history of Intelligence. Topics include definitions and problems of the history of Intelligence; various aspects of the history of Intelligence; and significant past, present and future events, operations and implications involving the history of Intelligence.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 400  (3-3-0)  Advanced Intelligence Analysis: Research, Methods and Writing: This advanced course serves as follow-on to the introductory analysis course and provides for the application of knowledge and further skill development of the analytical tradecraft. Special topics include analytical research, methodologies and writing.
Prerequisite: INTL 210
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INTL 410  (3-3-0)  Ethics and Intelligence: This course will examine the pertinent role of ethics in the business of Intelligence within the context of national security. Ethical theories, the role of ethics, protection of individual civil rights, ethical dilemmas posed by several current challenges and ways to make ethics a larger part of the national security dialogue will be addressed.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 420  (3-3-0)  Anthropological Issues in Intelligence: This course investigates the historical and contemporary cultural, religious, and social distinctions between the world's peoples as these variables bear on the Intelligence function.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 430  (3-3-0)  Strategic Intelligence Issues: Exploring a number of vital and current issues relative to strategic Intelligence, this advanced course is intended to assess intelligence requirements and develop strategies for the successful use of intelligence in U.S. foreign and security policy in the first decades of the twenty-first century.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 440  (3-3-0)  Emerging International Security Threats: This course surveys a suite of emerging international threats which pose serious security risks to international development, stability and progress. The purpose is to assess the future international security environment in order to help develop government policy, strategy and plans for dealing with emerging security threats like genocide; organized crime; narcotics trade; human trafficking; weapons proliferation; environmental, energy, health and financial perils; regional issues; and other related topics.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 450  (3-3-0)  International Terrorism: This course focuses on a wide range of relevant topics from the historical background and roots to the sociological, economic, and psychological aspects of International Terrorism and to the actual operational factors and policy implications.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 460  (3-3-0)  National Security Policy: This course will focus on U.S. national security and related-policy and the domestic and global factors affecting implementation.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 462  (3-3-0)  International Weapons Proliferation and Weapons of Mass Destruction: This course explores worldwide proliferation of weapons and military hardware with special attention given to weapons of mass destruction.
Prerequisite: INTL 200
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INTL 470  (3-3-0)  Internship: This course is designed for students to serve an external internship. As an intern, the students will be supervised in an experience in the application of principles and techniques to various areas of public service.
Prerequisite: INTL 400
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INTL 480  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: This course serves as a capstone class for students completing the Intelligence Studies program. It requires students to integrate and apply knowledge gained from the overall program curriculum. As part of the Senior Seminar, the students will research, write and present the findings and results of a topic that has significance to the profession of Intelligence Studies.
Prerequisite: INTL 400
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INTL 490  (3-3-0)  Advanced Readings and Research: This course allows students to conduct intensive, independent research studies of selected topics. The student will research, write and present the findings and results of the research.
Prerequisite: INTL 400
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PHIL 110  (3-3-0)  Critical Thinking: An introduction to the basic elements of argumentation, focusing on the analysis, evaluation, and development of claims and arguments in the sciences, the humanities, the social sciences, the applied sciences, and everyday life experiences. The course will strengthen the student’s abilities to analyze, evaluate, and develop claims and arguments.
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PHIL 120  (3-3-0)  Moral Principles and Contemporary Moral Issues: This course reviews moral principles and theories and applies them to such contemporary ethical issues as abortion, war, capital punishment, discrimination, poverty, and the environment. Analyzing and evaluating the variety of moral arguments brought to bear on such issues is a major focus of the course.
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PHIL 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Philosophy: An analytical study of ancient and modern philosophical problems in metaphysics, the philosophy of religion, epistemology, ethics, and political philosophy, with emphasis on encouraging critical approaches to theoretical and practical issues.
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PHIL 211  (3-3-0)  Introduction to World Religions: An examination of the religions of the world, including the nature of religious beliefs, spiritual beings and powers, myths, rituals, ethics, religious claims and arguments, and the impact of religions on culture, politics, society, and the daily lives of believers. Traditional African religions, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, religions of Meso America, religions of Native Americans, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, and Sikhism will be addressed.
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PHIL 212  (3-3-0)  African-American Philosophy: This course is a critical examination of the following concepts and issues pertaining to the African-American experience in historical and contemporary periods: oppression, resistance, justice, liberation, separatism, integration, affirmative action, identity, self-respect, race, class, gender, the universality of Western Philosophy, and cultural features of philosophy. These concepts and issues will be addressed through an analysis of writings by major figures such as: Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Alain Locke, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, William Jones, Cornel West, Angela Davis, Leonard Harris, Lucius Outlaw, and Bernard Boxill.
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PHIL 220  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Logic: An introduction to techniques of correct reasoning in informal contexts, to Aristotelian and mathematical logic, and to practical applications of logic, for example, in addressing contemporary issues and in completing the logic sections of national examinations such as the GRE, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT, and PRAXIS.
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PHIL 230  (3-3-0)  Political and Social Philosophy: An introduction to traditional and contemporary social-political thought and its relationship to practice, with emphasis on the interdependence of economic and sociopolitical issues and on the African viewpoint and its relationship to other world views.
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PHIL 310  (3-3-0)  Philosophy of Religion: A course examining the claims of religion from a logical point of view and covering such topics as traditional arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, evolution, knowledge and belief, religion and morality, religious experience and verification, and existentialism.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 315  (3-3-0)  Philosophy of Mind: This course addresses such key, perennial issues in the philosophy of mind as the nature of mind; the relationship of mind to body; the origin of mind; and the evolutionary function and value of mind. Because these issues have been traditionally addressed by philosophy and psychology, and more recently investigated by the empirical methods of neuroscience, it is appropriate and necessary that the course be interdisciplinary among these fields.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 320  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Ethics: A philosophical exploration of the basis of the good life, involving approaches to the problems of moral belief and practices.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 330  (3-3-0)  Ancient and Medieval Philosophy: A study of major philosophical developments from the ancient Greeks through the medieval period, emphasizing Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas. Students will develop skills in the analysis, development, and evaluation of claims and arguments connected with the ancient and medieval period.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 340  (3-3-0)  Modern Philosophy: This course provides a study of major philosophical developments of the modern period, with emphasis on the arguments of the rationalists and empiricists. Students will develop skills in the analysis, development, and evaluation of claims and arguments of the modern period.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 360  (3-3-0)  Existentialism: This seminar in philosophy provides a study of Existentialism as a response to the philosophical problems unique to the post-industrial societies as articulated by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, et al. Focusing primarily on such major existential themes as choice, responsibility, identity, freedom, and alienation, the students will explore the common concern of these thinkers about human existence and the conditions and quality of the life of the individual.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 370  (3-3-0)  Philosophy of Science: This course provides a philosophical exploration of issues in the philosophy of science and technology, and of problems of scientific belief and practice. Topic areas include the value of science; the nature of scientific activities; science and myth; generalization and related inductive reasoning; causal reasoning; scientific theories; science and society; change in science; and, scientific explanation. Students will develop skills in the analysis, development, and evaluation of scientific claims and scientific arguments.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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PHIL 430  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Philosophy: Individual or group study and critical discussion of selected philosophical issues.
Prerequisite: PHIL 110 Or PHIL 210 Or PHIL 220
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POLI 150  (3-3-0)  North Carolina Government and Politics: This course is concerned with the evolution and empirical foundation of North Carolina government and politics. It investigates issues related to community power and decision-making, political leadership, the relationship between North Carolina citizens and their government, citizen participation, and civic engagement and moral issues in political lives.
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POLI 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Political Science: The study of the basic principles and concepts of political science with emphasis on the nature and function of political systems. Various approaches to the study of politics and the relationship of political science to other social sciences will be examined.
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POLI 210  (3-3-0)  Principles of American Government: An introduction to the historical background, purposes, and functions of political institutions, especially the structures and activities of the American system - federal, state, and local.
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POLI 220  (3-3-0)  Principles of Public Administration: A study of basic concepts of administration including the following topics: the growth of administration as an art and a science; the relationship of administration to the political process; administrative organization and processes; the political power of bureaucracies; and the responsibility of public servants.
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POLI 230  (3-3-0)  Ethics and Global Affairs: The course will challenge students to apply theoretical discussions in a practical way to international ethical problems. It will examine great normative questions of international relations and challenge students to consider what those questions mean for how students conduct themselves as global citizens. Normative questions involve considerations of right and wrong, where the “rightness” and “wrongness” of the action is measured by some conception of the good.
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POLI 240  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Political Statistics: This course is designed for students to integrate empirical analyses and research methods with the substance of political and social research. Statistical techniques and applications have been chosen for their relevance to political science and policy analysis. This approach should make the study of statistics more meaningful and valuable to those who are uncertain about the role of statistical analysis in the social sciences.
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POLI 301  (3-3-0)  Organizational Theory: An analysis of organizational theories, incorporating the traditional political, environmental, behavioral, bureaucratic, and decision-making approaches and applying them to studies of modern organizations, with additional attention to current research on contemporary issues demonstrating the continuing development of organizational theory.
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POLI 311  (3-3-0)  Political Parties and Pressure Groups: A study of the history, structure, and functions of American political parties and pressure groups, their relationship to democratic government, and their techniques of political action.
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POLI 312  (3-3-0)  Public Leadership and Management: A course focusing on leadership styles, human motivations, and basic problems of management, including decision-making, communications, and public relations.
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POLI 320  (3-3-0)  State and Local Government: An examination of the framework of state and local governments in the United States and an evaluation of their contributions to federal systems, with special attention to North Carolina's governmental structure and contributions.
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POLI 321  (3-3-0)  Public Personnel Management: A study of the theory, practice, and organization of the public personnel system in the United States, including the essentials of personnel training, classification, compensation, promotion, testing, employee relations, and employee organizations.
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POLI 330  (3-3-0)  Public Financial Management: A study of the practices and problems of modern fiscal management, with special emphasis on budgeting concerns and techniques, budget management for planning and control, and budget review as an analytical tool at the national, state, and local levels of government.
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POLI 331  (3-3-0)  Politics and Urban Planning: A study of approaches to urban planning in the light of political realities in the nation, the state, and the community.
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POLI 332  (3-3-0)  The Legislative Process: A study of the evolution, structure, functioning processes, and dynamics of American legislative institutions, with emphasis on the interrelationships among the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches and outside groups in the law-making process.
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POLI 350  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Africa: A course examining characteristics of governments and politics in the developing nations of Africa, with attention to such concerns as colonialism, independence movements, and the problems of nation building.
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POLI 351  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Europe: A comparative analysis of the organization, functioning, and processes of governments and politics in the Soviet Union and selected European countries.
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POLI 352  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Asia: A course analyzing the organization, functioning, and processes of governments and politics in China, Japan, and other Asian nations.
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POLI 400  (3-3-0)  Administration of Urban Government: A study of the organization and management characteristics of various types of government entities in urban areas, including municipal government, county government, and governmental structures for other special districts.
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POLI 401  (3-3-0)  Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations: A course focusing on changing relationships of local, state, and federal agencies, the expanding role of regional planning boards, and recent developments in the sharing of federal tax revenue with non-national governments.
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POLI 402  (3-3-0)  Public Policy Formulation: A course covering approaches to decision-making in government and administration, including policy formulation within administrative agencies and departments and within the larger context of the overall political process.
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POLI 410  (3-3-0)  The American Chief Executive: A study of the origin, background, and evolution of the Office of the President of the United States, with a review of the president's powers in the areas of politics, administration, legislation, and foreign affairs.
Prerequisite: POLI 210
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POLI 411  (3-3-0)  Public Opinion and Propaganda: A study of the development of attitudes and beliefs, the nature of public opinion and propaganda, the methodology of public opinion polling, and the strategies and techniques for influencing public opinion through the uses of propaganda, mass media, and communications.
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POLI 412  (3-3-0)  Administrative Law: An investigation of administrative law, its powers and procedures, the liabilities of administrative agencies and officers, and governmental activities in the regulation of agriculture, industry, and labor.
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POLI 420  (3-3-0)  Research Methods in Public Management: A review of basic concepts, ideas, approaches, methods, and materials used to study administrative institutions, including simulation techniques, surveys, mathematical statistics, cybernetics, content analysis, and computers.
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POLI 422  (3-3-0)  American Foreign Policy: A study of American foreign policy decision-making with assessments of the effectiveness of foreign policies.
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POLI 430  (3-3-0)  International Politics: A study of the interplay of political forces in the international community, with emphasis on war-time diplomacy, peace treaties, and alignments of nations in times of peace and conflict during the postwar period.
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POLI 431  (3-3-0)  International Organization: A study of the basic concepts, historical backgrounds, evolution, and functioning of international governmental and administrative systems, with primary emphasis on the United Nations.
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POLI 432  (3-3-0)  International Law: A review of the rules and practices governing nations in peace and war; the nature, sources, evolution, and functioning of various schools of international law; principal law-making and adjudicatory agencies; international personalities; treaties; jurisdictions over person and place; diplomatic and consular interactions; peace settlements; war and neutrality.
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POLI 440  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Government Planning: A study of concepts, fundamentals, and methods of planning, focusing on the significance of planning to public administration and public policy, with special consideration of Program Planning Budgeting Systems (PPBS), Management by Objectives (MBO), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT), Planning, Management, and Evaluation (PME), and Zero Base Budgeting (ZBB).
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POLI 441  (3-3-0)  Citizen Participation in Policy Making: A study of citizens┐ involvement in political activities and in government policy making, with analyses of citizen initiated and government sponsored efforts to increase popular input, and assessments of the effects of citizen participation on policy making related to specific issues and to the performance of governments.
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POLI 442  (3-3-0)  Public Policy Analysis: A study of the methods and techniques used in determining the effectiveness of public programs, with emphasis on the development of appropriate systems for conducting evaluations and with the use of case studies for practical exercises in policy analysis.
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POLI 450  (3-3-0)  History of Political Theory: A survey of political theories and their practical applications from the days of ancient Greece to the sixteenth-century theorist, Jean Bodin.
Prerequisite: POLI 200
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POLI 460  (3-3-0)  History of Political Theory II: A continuation of the study of political theories from Thomas Hobbes to the present.
Prerequisite: POLI 200
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POLI 461  (3-3-0)  American Political Ideas: A study of the political ideas of leading American political leaders and public officials, with particular attention to the influences of these ideas upon American governmental systems.
Prerequisite: POLI 210 And POLI 200
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POLI 470  (3-3-0)  Government Internship: Supervised experience in the application of principles and techniques to various areas of public service, with supervision and evaluation under the direction of the instructor in cooperation with administrators of selected public agencies in the state, and with requirements including one-hour a week in lectures and conferences and at least nine hours a week on assignment at public agencies.
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POLI 471  (3-3-0)  Research Seminar: Practical experience in applying the research methods introduced in POLI 420 to in-depth studies of selected topics, incorporating computer technology for data gathering, analyses, and interpretation.
Prerequisite: POLI 420
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POLI 480  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Intensive independent studies of selected topics, requiring the preparation and presentation of assigned topics for critical review.
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POLI 481  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar - Selected Problems in Public Management: An analysis of problems in public management created by or associated with technological advancements, environmental changes, urbanism, the civil rights movement, ethics and values, private rights, and changing expectations.
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POLI 490  (3-3-0)  Advanced Reading and Research: Supervised reading and research in areas of special interest.
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POSC 101  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Law Enforcement: A study of the philosophy and history of law enforcement, including its legal limitations in a democratic republic; a survey of the primary duties and responsibilities of the various law enforcement agencies; a delineation of the basic processes of justice; an evaluation of law enforcement's current position; and an orientation relative to law enforcement as a vocation. Students who have completed CRJC 201 may not take this course.
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POSC 102  (3-3-0)  Highway Traffic Administration: An examination of the U.S. transportation system, including a study of complementary agencies that contribute to the effectiveness of operations within the system through the organization and administration of traffic flow regulations, traffic laws, traffic control, accident investigations, traffic courts, and regular operational analyses, with additional attention to the social, economic, and political impacts of the transportation system, including the complementary agencies in their contributory roles.
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POSC 111  (3-3-0)  Criminal Law: A presentation of the basic concepts of criminal law and an evaluation of the merits of rules of law and order in our system of government. Students who have completed CRJC 300 may not take this course.
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POSC 210  (3-3-0)  Criminal Investigation: An introduction to the fundamentals of investigation, including procedures and techniques for conducting crime scene searches; recording, collecting and preserving evidence; identifying, using, and protecting sources of information; conducting interviews and interrogations; preparing cases and making court presentations; and investigating specific criminal offenses. Students who have completed CRJC 210 may not take this course.
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POSC 221  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Criminalistics: A general survey of the methods and techniques used in modern scientific investigations of crimes, with emphasis on practical applications of demonstrated laboratory techniques and the use of available scientific equipment. Students who have completed CRJC 221 may not take this course.
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POSC 230  (3-3-0)  Criminal Evidence: POSC 230 (3-3-0) Criminal Evidence (CRJC 230); A study of the kinds and degrees of evidence and the rules governing the admissibility of evidence in court. Students who have completed CRJC 230 may not take this course.
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POSC 232  (3-3-0)  Police Organization and Administration: An introduction to the principles of police organization and administration, with special attention to the service functions; e.g., personnel management, police management, training, communications, records, property maintenance, and miscellaneous services.
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POSC 241  (3-3-0)  Crime Scene Technology: A review of processes governing the search for physical evidence, with emphasis on the location, reproduction, identification, collection, and preservation of evidence, and of the transportation of evidence to the crime laboratory, with laboratory situations providing practical experiences in applications of techniques and procedures studied.
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POSC 251  (3-3-0)  Criminal Procedures: A review of criminal procedures from incident to final disposition and a survey of the principles of constitutional, federal, state, and civil laws relative to law enforcement.
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POSC 262  (3-3-0)  Police Community Relations: A course in the development and use of community relations programs to aid and support the police, corrections programs, and the criminal justice system as a whole in their promotion of an orderly society. Students who have completed CRJC 262 may not take this course.
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POSC 400  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Criminal Interrogation and Confessions: A study of criminal interrogations and confessions, including such aspects as warning the subject, the Fourth Amendment Right of Privacy, the attitude of the interrogator, the classification of suspects for interrogation, tactics at interrogations, the interrogation of witnesses who may later become suspects, psychological tools to be used in extracting a confession from an unwilling suspect, procedures for reading suspects their rights and for informing them of those rights, the laws governing the admissibility of confessions in court, the use of trickery and deceit, and the latest laws- both federal and state-regarding, confessions and interrogations.
Prerequisite: POSC 101 Or CRJC 101 And CRJC 300
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PSCI 111  (4-4-0)  Physical Science I: An introduction to the principles, concepts, and ideas of the physical sciences (physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography), including lectures, discussions, and laboratory sessions devoted to physics and chemistry, with opportunities for making observations, developing problem-solving techniques, and using reasoning skills in guided applications of the scientific method.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently)
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PSCI 112  (4-4-0)  Physical Science II: A continuation of the principles, concepts, and ideas begun in Physical Science 1, including lectures, discussions, and laboratory sessions devoted to astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography, with opportunities for making observations, developing problem-solving techniques, and using reasoning skills in guided applications of the scientific method.
Prerequisite: PSCI 111
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