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Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014

CatalogUndergraduateCollege of Arts and SciencesENGLCourse Descriptions

English Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

ENGL 108  (4-3-2)  English Grammar and Usage: This course introduces students to issues of grammar and usage within an integrated literacy program that includes reading, writing and speaking. Standard grammatical and rhetorical conventions are examined to assess their current significance for acceptable social expression, especially in academic prose.
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ENGL 110  (3-3-0)  English Composition I: A course designed to give extensive practice in the writing process, with emphasis on expository forms appropriate to everyday personal, business, and academic writing. When taken for 4 credits two lab hours are included.
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ENGL 120  (3-3-0)  English Composition II: A course that continues practice in the composing process, with emphasis on argumentation and research. The course involves gathering, analyzing, and documenting information from secondary sources. When taken for 4 credit hours two lab hours are included.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 211  (3-3-0)  World Literature I: A study of major works of the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance, focusing on representative genres.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 212  (3-3-0)  World Literature II: A comparative study of major works of the Enlightenment, the Romantic Age, the period of Realism and Naturalism, and the Modern World.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 220  (3-3-0)  African-American Literature I: An historical and critical exploration of African American writers' contributions to American fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction, beginning with writers of the 1700s and continuing through 1900.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 222  (3-3-0)  History of the English Language: An historical study of the nature of the language from its beginnings to the present.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 223  (3-3-0)  African-American Literature II: A continuation of an historical and critical exploration of African American writers' contributions to American fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction, beginning with the 1900s and proceeding to the present.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 230  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Linguistics: An introduction to the inductive method of studying language, exploring the phonological, morphological, and syntactical aspects of language, dialectical variations, graphemics, sound, spelling, linguistic changes, bilingualism, field linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, uses of linguistics, and related topics.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 231  (3-3-0)  Advanced Grammar: A reinforcement of students' skills in grammatical analysis, focusing on the major theories of grammar and on the study of language acquisition in light of current research.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 232  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Film and Visual Literacy: This course will introduce students to basic concepts in film and other visual media such as video and Internet imaging. The course introduces students to formal vocabulary and methodology for developing the ability to consider visual texts critically. Through understanding and application of the basic concepts of film language, students will learn how elements such as editing, lighting, and composition within the frame, cinematography, and sound combine to constitute filmic discourse. In order to understand development in these categories, consideration will be given to film history.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 240  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Literature: An introduction to the major genres of literature, with intensive work in developing the critical skills of reading, evaluating, and interpreting literary works and in writing critical papers about literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 250  (3-3-0)  Women in Literature: This course examines the roles of women in literature as characters readers, and writers. Included in the readings are short stories, novels, novellas, essays, poetry, and drama, all by women and about women. The course will provide a historical overview of women's writing and will focus on the challenges of women writing, the creation and treatment of women's lives in literature, the form and content of women's writing, and the literary and feminist theories that discuss women's place in history and society by investigating the evolving conditions of women. Also the course examines how women represent themselves and what their expectations and hopes are for their own and daughters' futures.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 253  (3-3-0)  Images of Women: This course introduces students to traditional and nontraditional images of women as they have appeared in film, music, art, and literature of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. This course will encourage students to interrogate images of women in the popular culture of the present day.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 271  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism: This course will introduce students to contemporary trends in literary theory and criticism against the historical background, which contemporary theory is often a reaction against.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110
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ENGL 300  (3-3-0)  Children's Literature: An introduction to works of children's literature from a variety of ethnic origins and genres including folklore, myths, epics, biographies, fiction, poetry, and informational books.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 301  (3-3-0)  Adolescent Literature: A study of literature for and about the adolescent, examining reading programs and approaches to literature genres and modes characteristic of the literature, and essential elements of literary works for the adolescent.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 310  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Folklore: An introduction to the forms, aesthetic characteristics, and social contents of oral literatures and folk traditions, folktales, legends, myths, folksongs, proverbs, riddles, customs, and beliefs.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 311  (3-3-0)  English Literature I: A survey of the literature of England from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 312  (3-3-0)  English Literature II: A continuation of the survey of English literature, extending from the Romantic period to the present. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 320  (3-3-0)  The Renaissance: A study of the prose and poetry of representative authors of the Renaissance, including dramatists other than Shakespeare.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 321  (3-3-0)  American Literature I: A survey of the major writers of America from the earliest efforts at colonization through the Civil War.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 322  (3-3-0)  American Literature II: A survey of the major writers of America from the Civil War to the present. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 323  (3-3-0)  Literature of the Bible: A literary overview of the Bible, with major emphases on the stylistic and formal influences of the Bible in world literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 330  (3-3-0)  The Seventeenth Century: A survey of the metaphysical poets.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 331  (3-3-0)  American English Dialects: A study of dialectical variations in American English, emphasizing the reasons for historical, regional, and social variations in American English.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 335  (3-3-0)  Issues in Professional Writing: This foundation course engages students in applying rhetorical principles, research methods, analytical skills, and technologies to problem-based writing projects that model communications challenges faced by professional writers in complex, real-world settings. Students will consider political, cultural, ethical, and practical issues relevant to professional writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 340  (3-3-0)  Short Prose Fiction: A study of representative modern British, American, and continental writers of the short story and the short novel, with emphasis upon the techniques of the genre. Course offered as needed.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 341  (3-3-0)  Advanced Composition: A study of rhetorical strategies, sentence combining, editing, logic and persuasion, diction, usage, and research methods.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 342  (3-3-0)  Creative Writing: An introduction to various forms of modern fiction and poetry, with opportunities for the creation of original poetry and fiction.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 343  (3-3-0)  Teaching and Tutoring Writing: A study of composition as a discipline and current issues in the field of teaching and tutoring writing in secondary school English classes. This course emphasizes effective teaching strategies for high school English composition.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 344  (3-3-0)  Business and Professional Writing: This course explores the principle of effective writing in business and administration with special focus on the elements of mechanics, organization, technical style, and documentation. Students will learn various forms of writing commonly used in business communications, such as business letters, memorandums, reports and proposals. The course emphasizes clarity, conciseness, organization, format, style, tone, and correctness.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 345  (3-3-0)  Technical Writing: This course explores effective writing in technical genres, with a focus on adjusting content, organization and style for various audiences including peer, managerial, and lay audiences. Students will examine and produce various technical documents, such as instructions or manuals and reports, and engage in usability testing and revisions of documents.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 346  (3-3-0)  Creative Nonfiction Workshop: This course will introduce students to the art and craft of writing creative nonfiction for publication. Students will focus on three subgenres within the discipline: reportage (editorial writing), the personal essay, and travel writing. The course is conducted as a workshop; thus, students will submit drafts of their work to their classmates, receive verbal and written feedback, and revise accordingly. Towards the end of the course, students will develop a portfolio of their work for grading and submit at least one revised work to a journal or magazine for publication.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 347  (3-3-0)  Writing Children's Literature: This course will provide students with an understanding of how to write for children in different literary genres and with an opportunity to create written manuscripts for children. The course will also consider issues and trends in the children's publishing industry.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 350  (3-3-0)  Modern Poetry: A study of British and American poetry from Whitman, Dickinson, and Hardy to the present, with emphasis on the major poets of the twentieth century.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 360  (3-3-0)  Modern Drama: A survey of works of major playwrights from lbsen and Strindberg to contemporaries such as Pinter and Stoppard.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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ENGL 370  (3-3-0)  Junior Seminar: Directed study on special topics in English conducted by members of the department.
Prerequisite: Junior standing
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ENGL 401  (3-3-0)  Chaucer: A course on The Canterbury Tales and on other works selected from the Chaucer canon, with consideration of literary, social, religious and philosophical backgrounds of the time.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
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ENGL 411  (3-3-0)  Shakespeare: A study of selected major Shakespearean dramas, including comedies, histories, and tragedies, and of Shakespeare's development as a dramatist. Requirement for English majors.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
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ENGL 412  (3-3-0)  Eighteenth Century: A survey of the major English writers from the Restoration - the age of Dryden, of Pope, and of Johnson to the beginning of Romanticism and a study of the rise of the English novel in the eighteenth century.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
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ENGL 420  (3-3-0)  Advanced Reports and Presentation Writing: This course emphasizes the analysis and production of professional reports and presentations. Students will read, analyze, format for printing and transmission, draft, revise and edit reports in multiple formats, for multiple audiences, and for flexible purposes.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
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ENGL 431  (3-3-0)  The Novel: A study of the novel as a literary mode with emphasis on selected major works.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
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ENGL 432  (3-3-0)  Romantic Poetry and Prose: A study of the major British Romantics, with an examination of representative works by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats in their cultural and critical contexts.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Junior Standing
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ENGL 470  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Directed study on special topics in English conducted by members of the Department.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing
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ENGL 480  (3-3-0)  Internship: Supervised practical experience in a professional setting.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120 And Senior Standing
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