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Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017

CatalogUndergraduateCollege of Arts and SciencesCHEMCourse Descriptions

Chemistry and Physics Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

ASTR 101  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Astronomy I: The Solar System: A general introductory course in astronomy that covers celestial motions of the earth, sun, moon, and planets; nature of light; ground and space-based telescopes; comparative planetology; the earth and the moon; terrestrial and gas planets and their moons; dwarf planets, asteroids, and comets; planetary system formation; extrasolar planets; and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). Although this is not a lab course, telescopic observations and student-led inquiry are incorporated into the course, with emphasis on the investigation of nearby space , including the sun, moon, and planets, and with laboratory exercises illustrating the scientific methods and techniques used in gathering information about the planets, moons, and other objects in the Solar System.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 126
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ASTR 101L  (1-0-2)  Introduction to Astronomy Lab I: Rocket Science: This laboratory course features activities that are designed to enhance student understanding of the practice of modern astronomy as well as to enhance hands-on STEM competency. The organizing principle of this lab is “rocket science,” a recapitulation of the intellectual quest that has enabled humans to journey amongst the planets. Activities will include telescope design, a study of electromagnetic radiation, using telescopes at the FSU Observatory, and launching rockets. The course will also incorporate an examination of the prospects for the continuation of this enterprise indefinitely into the future, this incorporating sustainability into the course.
Corequisite: ASTR 101
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ASTR 102  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Astronomy II: Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology: A course designed to provide students with a follow-up examination of astronomy, reinforcing a theoretical and practical understanding of the scientific process and an enthusiasm for its utilization in the solution of relevant challenges that they may expect to face in their own lives. Relevant scientific principles will be utilized throughout the course, including mechanics and the nature of light. Coverage will include the sun; stellar observables; star birth, evolution, and death; novae and supernovae; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; the Milky Way galaxy; normal galaxies; active galaxies and quasars; dark matter; dark energy; cosmology; the early universe; the possible multiverse; and the prospects for the existence of life elsewhere in the universe.
Prerequisite: ASTR 101
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ASTR 102L  (1-0-2)  Introduction to Astronomy Lab II: Our Place in Space: In this course, students will learn how to use robotic telescopes in the Chilean Andes and around the world, and use these telescopes to observe planets, dwarf planets, moons, asteroids, binary and variable stars, supernovae, star-forming regions, star clusters, and galaxies. Through these observations, students will explore the following topics: the seasons, the Galilean revolution, the cosmic distance ladder, the Great Debate, dark matter, Hubble’s Law, and dark energy.
Corequisite: ASTR 102
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ASTR 213  (3-3-0)  Life in the Universe: The aim of this course is to convey the detailed conceptual ideas associated with the important and topical question of the formation of life in the universe. The course will discuss all the environmental circumstances that seem to encourage the start of any life form and investigate the current state of our knowledge of life outside of the earth. This course addresses fundamental questions regarding the prospects of life elsewhere in the universe and the best ways to search for evidence of such life. These questions are looked at from a multidisciplinary viewpoint, which includes astronomy, biology, chemistry, and geology. However, other issues, including historical, cultural, and philosophical perspectives, are also included.
Prerequisite: ASTR 101
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ASTR 214  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Astronomy: A Cosmic Perspective on the Sustainability of Human Civilization: This course provides an overview from a cosmic perspective of the challenges facing humanity in the development of a sustainable lifestyle on Earth. We survey the history of humanity’s impact on the Earth’s mineral and biological resources, and consider problems posed by the exponential rise of some of these impacts. Limits to growth are explored, as are the reduction of impacts that can occur with human behavior more aligned with the finite nature of the Earth’s resources. The prospects of human colonization of other bodies in the solar system, galaxy, and universe are examined.
Prerequisite: ASTR 101
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BICH 411  (3-3-0)  Biochemistry I: An introductory course that provides a theoretical basis for the major principles in biochemistry. The course includes an historical perspective of biochemistry, and a study of the four major biological macromolecules: proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Three major areas of biochemistry will be emphasized: (1) acid/base equilibria; (2) structure and function of bio-molecules; and (3) biological information flow. In addition to lectures and discussions, problem sets will be assigned to equip students with an understanding of basic biochemical principles and to promote critical thinking and problem solving skills.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And (CHEM 220 Or CHEM 223)
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BICH 412  (3-3-0)  Biochemistry II: A study of bioenergetics, biosynthesis of major biological macromolecules, and metabolic pathways in animals, plants, and microbes. Emphasis will also be placed on methods of purification and analysis of biological macromolecules and applications of basic biochemical principles to living systems. In addition to lectures and discussions, problem sets will be assigned to equip students with an understanding of basic biochemical principles and to promote critical thinking and problem solving skills. The course content will be correlated with the laboratory exercises in the co-requisite Biochemistry laboratory (BICH 421).
Prerequisite: BICH 411 Or BICH 421
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BICH 421  (1-0-1)  Biochemistry Laboratory: The application of biochemical principles and techniques to the separation, purification, and analysis of biological substances, and to the investigation of metabolic activity.
Prerequisite: BICH 411 And BICH 412 (may be taken concurrently)
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CHEM 101  (4-3-2)  Introduction to Chemical Principles: A one semester course directed at non-chemistry majors that provides an introduction to general chemistry, and the fundamentals of biological chemistry. The course with its laboratory activities introduces states of matter, atoms and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, mole concept, gas laws, pH and acid-base chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 129
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CHEM 102  (4-3-2)  Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry: A one semester course directed at non-chemistry majors that provides an introduction to organic chemistry and principles of biochemistry. This course with its laboratory activities, introduces hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, amino acids, nucleic acids, protein, fat, carbohydrate, and discusses the chemistry involved in metabolic pathways and energy production.
Prerequisite: CHEM 101
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CHEM 105  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Chemical Principles Lecture: This one-semester course is designed for non-chemistry majors as an introduction to basic chemistry principles. The course introduces states of matters, atoms and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, mole concept, gas laws, pH and acid-based chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 129. Corequisite: CHEM 105L
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CHEM 105L  (1-0-2)  Introduction to Chemical Principles Laboratory: This one-semester laboratory course is designed for non-chemistry majors. It introduces how to safely and effectively conduct independent laboratory experiments, review data and construct graphs, physical and chemical properties, law of conservation of energy, electronic configuration of elements, molecular geometry, types of chemical bonds, chemical reactions, concentrations of solutions (e.g. molarity), and ideal gas law.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 Or MATH 129. Corequisite: CHEM 105
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CHEM 106  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry Lecture: This course is designed for non-chemistry majors as an introduction to organic chemistry and principles of biochemistry. It introduces hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, amino acids, nucleic acids, protein, fat, carbohydrate, and discusses the chemistry involved in metabolic pathways and energy production.
Prerequisite: CHEM 105 And CHEM 105L. Corequisite: CHEM 106L
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CHEM 106L  (1-0-2)  Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory: This one-semester laboratory course is designed for non-chemistry majors. It reinforces the fundamental facts, theories, and laws of chemistry through laboratory experiences. Laboratory activities introduce synthesis and reactions of hydrocarbons, organic functional groups, amino acids, nucleic acids, proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. Safe laboratory techniques and the writing of quality laboratory reports are emphasized. Laboratory component of CHEM 106.
Prerequisite: CHEM 105 And CHEM 105L. Corequisite: CHEM 106
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CHEM 120  (3-3-0)  The Atom and Bonding: A non-mathematical study of atomic structure, elementary nuclear theory, the periodic table, bonding, valence, hybridization, and molecular and crystal structure. Corequisite: MATH 123.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently)
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CHEM 130  (4-3-3)  Stoichiometry: The study of stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, and the balancing of chemical equations, with laboratory activities investigating mole-mass relationships, gas laws, and measurement of thermochemical phenomena.
Prerequisite: CHEM 120 And MATH 123
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CHEM 141  (3-4-0)  General Chemistry I Lecture: The first course of a two semester sequence in introductory chemistry that studies measurement and uncertainty, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry, types of reactions, solution concentrations, gas laws, thermochemistry, electronic configuration, periodic properties of the elements, and chemical bonding (including molecular geometries). The course includes a mandatory one-hour non-credit recitation period per week.
Prerequisite: MATH 129 Or MATH 131
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CHEM 142  (1-0-3)  General Chemistry I Laboratory: This laboratory course that accompanies CHEM 141 introduces laboratory techniques, physical properties, stoichiometry, gas laws, and types of chemical reactions. Safe laboratory techniques and the writing of quality laboratory reports will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: MATH 129 Or MATH 131
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CHEM 161  (3-4-0)  General Chemistry II Lecture: The second part of a two semester (one year) course in college level chemistry. The course investigates kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. The course has an additional mandatory one-hour non-credit recitation period per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And MATH 130 Or MATH 131
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CHEM 162  (1-0-3)  General Chemistry II Laboratory: This continuation of the General Chemistry I Laboratory (CHEM 142) investigates solution properties, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and qualitative and elementary quantitative analysis.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And MATH 130 Or MATH 131
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CHEM 200  (2-1-2)  Chemical Literature: Search and Analysis: This course introduces the methods of online chemical literature search and provides training on how to critically evaluate scientific literature. Students will research a relatively narrow topic under the guidance of a faculty mentor, present the topic through oral presentations and written literature reviews, and participate in scheduled departmental seminars.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 with a C or higher
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CHEM 205  (4-4-0)  Chemical Process Principles: An introduction to material and energy balance principles for chemical systems. Topics include fluid density, flow rate, chemical composition variables, pressure, and temperature. Students will be able to approach problems from a chemical engineering standpoint, including problems involving recycle, bypass, and reactive processes.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 241, PHYS 211, and CHEM 211 and 212 or CHEM 223 and 224
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CHEM 211  (3-3-0)  Analytical Chemistry Lecture: A one semester course that investigates the principles of quantitative analytical chemistry and how these principles are applied in chemistry and related disciplines. Lecture and laboratory concentrate on tools, experimental error, statistics, quality assurance, calibration methods, systematic treatment of equilibrium, acid-base titration, EDTA titration, redox titration, gravimetric analysis, introduction to electroanalytical and spectrometric methods, concepts of analytical separation and application of Excel in analytical chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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CHEM 212  (2-0-6)  Analytical Chemistry Lab: A one-semester analytical chemistry laboratory course that investigates the principles of quantitative analytical chemistry and how the principles and techniques of classical methods (e.g., gravimetric, titrimetric, and redox) of analysis and some of the most common instrumental methods (e.g., spectrometric and separation techniques) are applied in chemistry and related disciplines. Laboratory experimentations will involve the use of these analytical techniques in the determination of substances in a variety of sample matrices.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162.
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CHEM 220  (4-3-3)  Principle of Organic Chemistry: A one-semester course in which the chemistry of the hydrocarbons (including aromatics) and monofunctional alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids (and their derivatives), and amines is surveyed. The course will conclude with an introduction to the chemistry of polyfunctional biomolecules. The laboratory will consist of the techniques used in the purification, isolation, and identification by physical properties of organic compounds and conclude with the utilization of these techniques in the preparation of organic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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CHEM 223  (3-3-0)  Organic Chemistry I Lecture: A study of the nomenclature, synthesis, reactions and reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopy of hydrocarbons alkylhalides and alcohols, with laboratory exercises introducing techniques of isolation, purification, characterization, and synthetic methods in organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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CHEM 224  (1-0-3)  Organic Chemistry I Lab: A study of laboratory exercises introducing techniques in isolation, purification, characterization, and synthetic methods in organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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CHEM 225  (4-4-0)  Organic Chemistry II Lecture: A course investigating the nomenclature, synthesis, reactions and reaction mechanisms, and methods for analysis of functionally substituted organic compounds, with laboratory activities extending the topics started in CHEM223 and emphasizing syntheses and technical writing.
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
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CHEM 226  (1-0-3)  Organic Chemistry II Lab: A course investigating the nomenclature, synthesis, reactions and reaction mechanism, and methods for analysis of functionally substituted organic compounds with laboratory activities extending the topics started in CHEM 223 and emphasizing syntheses and technical writing.
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
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CHEM 227  (3-3-0)  Chemical Process Systems: Introduction of mathematical and computational tools for analyzing chemical engineering problems. Sequential modular and equation-based simulation of steady-state chemical processes using advanced spreadsheet methods and multivariate root-finding algorithms. Material and energy balances on transient processes and their solution using analytical and numerical methods. Introduction to microscopic material and energy balances using the "shell balance" approach to develop the governing differential equations. Solutions to steady-state boundary value problems in heat conduction and Fickian diffusion.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: Grade of C or better in CHEM 205 And MATH 242; Corequisite: MATH 331 Grade of C or better in CHEM 205 And MATH 242 Grade of C or better in CHEM 205 And MATH 242 Grade of C or better in CHEM 205 And MATH 242
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CHEM 310  (4-2-4)  Instrumental Analysis: Principles of operation and application of modern chemical instrumentation used in analytical chemistry. Topics include statistics, spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electroanalytical, and separation science. Reinforcement of these techniques by practical experience, aspects of sample preparation, standardization, data acquisition and interpretation.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212
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CHEM 311  (3-3-0)  Instrumental Analysis Lecture: One-semester lecture course that introduces modern instrumental methods on qualitative and quantitative analytical chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, chemical separations methods, and electroanalytical chemistry used in biological, materials, environmental, and chemical systems; major to trace components with accuracy and precision; various physical states of matter; chemical speciation.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 with a grade of C or higher
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CHEM 311L  (2-0-4)  Instrumental Analysis Laboratory: One-semester laboratory course designed to provide hands-on experience with modern chemical instrumentation for qualitative and quantitative measurements. Experiments include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, chemical separations methods, and electroanalytical chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 with a grade of C or higher. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 311
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CHEM 313  (3-3-0)  Physical Chemistry I: The first course in a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry that investigates the properties of real gases, the three laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria for single and binary systems, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, the transport properties of matter, the kinetic theory, and the application and derivation of integrated rate laws.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 121 And PHYS 122 (may be taken concurrently)
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CHEM 313L  (1-0-3)  Physical Chemistry I Laboratory: A survey of the experimental methods of physical chemistry to study calorimetry, thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, chemical kinetics, and colligative and transport properties for binary systems.
Prerequisite: CHEM 310 with a C or higher. Corequisite: CHEM 313
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CHEM 314  (3-3-0)  Physical Chemistry II: The second course in a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physical chemistry, that provides an introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications to atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy and investigates statistical mechanics as a bridge between microscopic and macroscopic worlds. Students will also be exposed to molecular reaction dynamics, including collision theory and activated-complex theory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 313
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CHEM 314L  (1-0-3)  Physical Chemistry II Laboratory: A survey of the experimental methods of physical chemistry to study atomic and molecular spectroscopy, molecular structure, chemical dynamics, and the chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles, as well as an introduction to computational chemistry methods.
Prerequisite: CHEM 313 And CHEM 313L with a C or higher. Corequisite: CHEM 314
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CHEM 321  (3-3-0)  Thermodynamics and Equilibrium: A calculus-based study of the three laws of thermodynamics with derivation of equilibrium constants from chemical potential, Raoult’s Law, the phase rule, and equilibrium electrochemistry including the Debye-Hueckle theory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 121 And PHYS 122 (may be taken concurrently)
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CHEM 322  (3-3-0)  Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy: A course investigating the wave-particle dilemma as resolved by the Bohr atom, Dirac wave mechanics, and Eigen values of the Schroedinger equation, with applications to atomic and molecular vibrational, rotational, and electronic spectra.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 122
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CHEM 324  (3-3-0)  Kinetics: A study of change, including the transport properties of gases and liquids and electrical conduction. Starting with the kinetic theory of gases, the absolute rate theory and the collision theory are derived. Other topics include rates; mechanisms including complex mechanisms (consecutive, chain, branching, autocatalytic, and polymerizing); and the half-life of chemical reactions. Students will also be exposed to the steady-state approximation, and the study of the Arrhenius theory for calculation of activation parameters.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And MATH 241 And MATH 242 And PHYS 122
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CHEM 325  (3-0-6)  Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Laboratory investigations involving the determination of enthalpies, equilibrium constants, molecular mass, electromotive force, entropy, reaction rates and activation parameters, solution phenomena, conductance, and the gathering and quantitative interpretation of spectra.
Prerequisite: CHEM 313
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CHEM 330  (3-3-0)  Principles of Inorganic Chemistry: A focus on trends of inorganic reactions, structure, and properties of the elements and their compounds in relation to their position in the periodic table. Students will be able to rationalize and interpret most inorganic properties using qualitative models that are based on quantum mechanics, such as the properties of atomic orbitals and their use to form molecular orbitals. Modern organometallic compounds will be introduced, and the environmental impact of inorganic chemistry will be discussed. This course will consist of lecture and discussion sessions.
Prerequisite: CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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CHEM 390  (1-0-3)  Research I: A detailed examination of topics and studies in chemistry in preparation for beginning a formal research project to be conducted in CHEM 491 and CHEM 492, culminating in a written and oral report.
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CHEM 400  (3-2-2)  Computational Chemistry: This class introduces students to different computational methods and models to study electronic structure of molecules and materials. The topics that will be covered include Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, coupled cluster and semi-empirical methods such as Huckel and expended Huckel calculations. The laboratory activities include computational experiments to illustrate the applicability of computational methods to chemistry, bio-sciences, and materials chemistry. These experiments will be carried out on Linux and UNIX-based workstations.
Prerequisite: CHEM 225 And CHEM 226 And CHEM 314
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CHEM 410  (1-0-3)  Seminar in Chemical Literature: A detailed examination of the chemical literature on a relatively narrow topic for presentation of written and oral reports.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
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CHEM 421  (3-3-0)  Inorganic Chemistry: An advanced study of descriptive and synthetic inorganic chemistry, structure, and bonding.
Prerequisite: CHEM 225 And CHEM 226
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CHEM 422  (3-2-3)  Bioanalytical Chemistry: An advanced analytical chemistry course that involves the separation, detection, identification, and quantification of biological samples, such as proteins, peptides, DNA, and drugs. Topics include spectroscopy immunoassays, chromatography, electrophoresis, mass spectroscopy, biosensors, bioassays, DNA, and protein sequencing.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And CHEM 225 And CHEM 226
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CHEM 423  (3-2-3)  Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: A comprehensive introduction to the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Topics cover the properties, synthesis, and characterization of nanomaterials and their applications to nanobiotechnology, nanomedicine, and nanoelectronics, as well as laboratory activities involving the synthesis and characterization of novel nanostructures.
Prerequisite: (CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And PHYS 122) Or (MATS 260 And PHYS 122)
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CHEM 424  (3-2-3)  Separation Science: The course introduces the modern physical and chemical techniques used for analytical separations. The primary theme of chromatography, includes gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, and supercritical fluid chromatography. Other important analytical separation techniques to be discussed include capillary electrophoresis, field-flow fractionation, size exclusion chromatography, and chromatographic measurements of physicochemical, biochemical, and geochemical processes.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212
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CHEM 430  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Chemistry: An advanced, structured investigation in one of the specialty areas of chemistry.
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CHEM 431  (3-1-4)  Qualitative Organic Analysis: An advanced introduction to the principles of classification and identification of organic compounds by traditional and modern analytic techniques.
Prerequisite: CHEM 223 And CHEM 224
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CHEM 490  (4-1-6)  Chemistry Research and Ethics: A capstone research course for seniors that offers a comprehensive examination of the Chemistry curriculum. The course provides detailed training in ethics education, literature reading and review, research planning, hands-on research practicing, lab reports, and oral/ written presentations. Students must adopt a research area and work with a research advisor.
Prerequisite: CHEM 310 Or instructor approval
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CHEM 491  (2-0-6)  Research II: Active, original research under one or more of the chemistry faculty.
Prerequisite: CHEM 390
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CHEM 492  (4-0-12)  Research II and Thesis: A continuation of research culminating in a written thesis and an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: CHEM 491
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CHEM 499  (3-1-5)  Chemistry Capstone: A senior-level capstone course that provides detailed training in scientific ethics, literature review, research planning and practice, and oral/ written presentations. In this student-centered, self-directed course, students pursue focused research through active learning. This course requires students to recall what they learned in previous courses and to select the most appropriate methods and analytical techniques to complete the project. Students write a research thesis and present their research findings to a group of fellow chemists and chemistry faculty in a professional manner.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CHEM 310 Or instructor approval
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ENGR 101  (1-1-0)  Introduction to Engineering and Problem Solving: This course provides general information on engineering disciplines, common engineering practices, the engineering profession and history, engineering education, engineering design, engineering ethics and engineering opportunities from the instructor and/or invited speakers. Preliminary work on a design project will be undertaken by student teams.
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ENGR 102  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Engineering Graphics: This course introduces the students to skills of effective communication through engineering drawing. Topics include drawing instruments, lettering, geometric drawing, freehand sketching, orthographic projection, CAD systems, and examples of actual engineering drawings.
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ENGR 201  (3-3-0)  Engineering Statics: Basic concepts of forces in equilibrium are introduced. Distributed forces, frictional forces are discussed. Inertial properties are analyzed in application to machines, structures, and systems.
Prerequisite: PHYS 121 And MATH 242 (may be taken concurrently)
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ENGR 202  (3-3-0)  Engineering Dynamics: An introduction to kinematics of particles in rectangular, cylindrical, and curvilinear coordinate systems; energy and momentum methods for particles; kinetics of systems of particles; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies in two or three dimensions; motion relative to rotating coordinate systems.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And ENGR 201
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ENGR 204  (3-3-0)  Properties of Engineering Materials: This course is an introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and constitution of metallic and nonmetallic materials and the relationship among these principles and the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of engineering materials. The influence of the atomic the and grain structure of structural materials on mechanical properties will be considered. The effects of mechanical and heat treatments on structure and properties of materials are examined. Fatigue and creep of materials, fracture toughness, mechanical and non-destructive evaluation, environmental effects are studied. This course also addresses design considerations as well as characteristics of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And PHYS 121
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ENGR 214  (3-3-0)  Solid Mechanics: Concepts and theories of internal force, stress, strain, and strength of structural elements under static loading conditions. Constitutive behavior for linear elastic structures is discussed. Deflection and stress analysis procedures for bars, beams, and shafts will be considered. Introduction to matrix, analysis of structures will be made.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And ENGR 201 And ENGR 204 (may be taken concurrently)
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GEOL 311  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Geology I: An introductory course in physical geology concerned principally with the composition of the earth's crust and the processes that act to change its upper surface.
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GEOL 312  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Geology II: A continuation of GEOL 311, including studies of the active internal processes of the earth, such as plate tectonics and earthquakes, and of the earth's interior composition and structure, with introductions to historical geology and the succession of life forms that formerly lived on the earth.
Prerequisite: GEOL 311
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MATS 160  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Materials Science: This course is an introduction to topics in materials science, including the synthesis, fabrication, structures, properties and applications of materials. It covers various types of materials, such as metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers, and composite materials. Projects will be done using laboratory optical and electron microscopes to study the structure of various samples.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142
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MATS 204  (3-3-0)  Properties of Engineering Materials: This course (cross-listed as ENGR 204) is an introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and constitution of metallic and nonmetallic materials and the relationship among these principles and the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of engineering materials. The influence of the atomic the and grain structure of structural materials on mechanical properties will be considered. The effects of mechanical and heat treatments on structure and properties of materials are examined. Fatigue and creep of materials, fracture toughness, mechanical and non-destructive evaluation, environmental effects are studied. This course also addresses design considerations as well as characteristics of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And PHYS 121
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MATS 214  (3-3-0)  Solid Mechanics: This course (cross-listed as ENGR 214) is an investigation of the concepts and theories of internal force, stress, strain, and strength of structural elements under static loading conditions. Constitutive behavior for linear elastic structures is discussed. Deflection and stress analysis procedures for bars, beams, and shafts will be considered. Introduction to matrix, analysis of structures will be made.
Prerequisite: MATH 242 And MATS 204
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MATS 260  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Nanomaterials: This course is an introduction to the rapidly developing field of nanomaterials and their applications. Topics cover nanomaterials properties, fabrication, and characterization. Students will work in small groups to carry out projects on nanomaterial imaging of provided specimens, using electron microscopy and/or atomic force microscopy.
Prerequisite: MATS 160 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122) Or instructor consent
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MATS 301  (3-2-3)  Introduction to Polymer Science: This course covers general concepts about polymeric systems including synthesis, characterization, structure development and bulk properties. Applications of polymers including fibers and composites are also covered.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 Or (CHEM 223 And CHEM 224)
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MATS 311  (4-2-4)  Scanning Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis: This course provides students with cutting-edge electron microscopy research skills using stateof-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA), to study the structure of diverse material or biological samples. It comprises both theories in the lectures and hands-on trainings in the laboratories. Upon completion of the course, the students are trained to utilize the microscopy skills for independent research.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122)
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MATS 321  (3-3-0)  X-Ray Diffraction Analysis: This course provides fundamental knowledge and analyzing skills in X-ray diffraction method. It covers the physics of X-ray generation, characteristics and safety issues; crystal geometry and Bragg diffraction; and various applications of XRD for materials research, including crystal structure determination, precise lattice parameter measurement, qualitative and quantitative phase analyses, crystal size and stress measurement.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122)
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MATS 360  (4-3-2)  Introduction to Electronic Materials: This course is an introduction to the fundamental properties of semiconductors used in electronic, optoelectronic, and photovoltaic fields. The emphasis will be on material electronic and optical properties, which are intertwined with crystal structure and chemical composition of such materials. Laboratory activities will be carried out in the form of problem-solving through computer simulations of material properties, as well as material electric and optical characterization. Students will have hands-on measurements of resistivity of silicon, photoconductivity, and quantum efficiency spectroscopy of optical-electron conversion in solar cells and optical sensors.
Prerequisite: MATS 204 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And (PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122)
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MATS 423  (3-2-3)  Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: This course (cross-listed as CHEM 423) is a comprehensive introduction to the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Topics cover the properties, synthesis, and characterization of nanomaterials and their applications to nanobiotechnology/ nanomedicine and nanoelectronics, as well as laboratory activities involving the synthesis and characterization of novel nanostructures.
Prerequisite: CHEM 211 And CHEM 212 And PHYS 122 Or (MATS 260 And PHYS 122) or instructor approval
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MATS 460  (4-3-2)  Electronic Materials and Processing: This is an in-depth course that focuses on electronic and optoelectronic materials. It discusses the materials science of semiconductor processing, with emphasis on elemental (silicon and germanium) and III-V compound (gallium arsenide) semiconductors and related materials. The course includes the thermochemistry of semiconductors, the dynamics of defect formation, and the processing and process control to achieve desired materials properties. The course discusses the principles of design and production of novel materials to obtain electronic devices with superior performances; in essence, the science of how to obtain nanostructured electronic and opto-electronic materials.
Prerequisite: MATS 360
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NSCI 110  (4-3-2)  Comprehensive Physical Science: The course is designed to present major basic concepts of physics and chemistry with particular emphasis on relevant applications to day to day activities. Lab experiments and class activities will help in developing critical thinking and analytical skills.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently)
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NSCI 111  (3-3-0)  Comprehensive Physical Science Lecture: This one-semester course is designed for non-science majors to present major concepts of basic physics and chemistry with particular emphasis on relevant applications to day to day activities.
Prerequisite and Corequisite: MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently). Corequisite: NSCI 111L
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NSCI 111L  (1-0-2)  Comprehensive Physical Science Laboratory: This laboratory course is designed to practice and train laboratory techniques and skills based upon basic concepts of physics and chemistry with particular emphasis on relevant applications to day to day activities. Laboratory activities will help in developing critical thinking and analytical skills.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 (may be taken concurrently). Corequisite: NSCI 111
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PHYS 110  (2-2-0)  Basic Physics: An introduction to fundamental concepts of measurements, dimensions and units, scalars and vectors, forces and free-body diagrams, work and energy, with attention to the improvement of problem solving and computational skills.
Prerequisite: MATH 123
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PHYS 111  (4-3-2)  General Physics I: An introductory study of the phenomena and concepts of classical physics, emphasizing mechanics, wave motion, fluids, temperature, and heat, with laboratory exercises providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: MATH 124 Or MATH 129 Or MATH 130
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PHYS 112  (4-3-2)  General Physics II: A continuation of PHYS 111, emphasizing the principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and physical optics, with laboratory exercises providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to the topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: PHYS 111
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PHYS 113  (2-2-0)  General Physics III: A continuation of PHYS 112, emphasizing the concepts and principles of modern physics, including special relativity, quantum physics, nuclear and high energy physics. Conceptual demonstrations of essential principles will be an integrated feature of this course.
Prerequisite: PHYS 112
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PHYS 115  (3-3-0)  General Physics I: An algebra-based introductory study of Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, and related concepts, with special emphasis on problem solving. Topics include a description of both linear and rotational motion, Newton’s laws of motion, conservation principles, heat, and thermodynamics.
Prerequisite: MATH 129 And MATH 130 Or MATH 131
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PHYS 116  (3-3-0)  General Physics II: A continuation of PHYS 115, emphasizing the principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 115 And PHYS 125L
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PHYS 121  (4-3-2)  College Physics I: A calculus-based introductory study of Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, thermodynamics, and related concepts, with special emphasis on problem-solving and with laboratory experiences providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently) And MATH 142
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PHYS 122  (4-3-2)  College Physics II: A continuation of PHYS 121, emphasizing the principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and physical optics, with laboratory exercises providing practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in lectures.
Prerequisite: PHYS 121
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PHYS 123  (2-2-0)  College Physics III: A continuation of PHYS 122, emphasizing the principles of special relativity, quantum physics, nuclear and high energy physics. Demonstrations of essential principles will be an integrated feature of this course.
Prerequisite: PHYS 122
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PHYS 125  (3-3-0)  College Physics I: A calculus-based introductory study of Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, thermodynamics, and related concepts, with special emphasis on problem solving.
Prerequisite: MATH 142 And MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently)
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PHYS 125L  (1-0-2)  College Physics I Laboratory: The College Physics I Laboratory will provide a broad array of basic skills of experimental physics and data analysis. Specifically, the course will provide practical knowledge in handling various laboratory apparatus, data collection, graphing, analyzing, and interpreting experimental data mostly related to topics discussed in the lectures.
Prerequisite: MATH 129 And MATH 130 Or MATH 142
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PHYS 126  (3-3-0)  College Physics II: A continuation of PHYS 125, emphasizing the principles of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 125 And PHYS 125L
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PHYS 126L  (1-0-2)  College Physics II Laboratory: The College Physics II Laboratory activities will provide practical knowledge in handling laboratory apparatus, data collection, and data interpretation related to topics discussed in lectures such as electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 115 Or PHYS 125 And PHYS 125L
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PHYS 211  (4-3-2)  Mechanics: An intermediate-level concentration in mechanics dealing with vector analysis, central force problems, rotational motion, and time, position, and velocity dependent forces, steady state and time varying forced oscillations and the Lagrangian method. Laboratory exercises complement theoretical concepts covered in the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 331 (may be taken concurrently) And PHYS 121 And MATH 242
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PHYS 212  (4-3-2)  Heat: An intermediate-level concentration in thermodynamics dealing with the laws of thermodynamics, open and closed systems, kinetic theory of gases, heat engines, and statistical mechanics with laboratory exercises complementing theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 And PHYS 122
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PHYS 301  (4-3-2)  Electronics for Scientists: An introduction to the foundations of electronics for students of the sciences, with specific consideration of the properties of semi conducting elements. The course emphasizes various types of electronic circuits and devices such as amplifiers, and other solid state devices, using linear and digital circuits. Construction and analysis of electronic circuits and devices, with experimental demonstrations of their uses, are essential components of the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently) And PHYS 112 Or PHYS 123 And MATH 142
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PHYS 302  (4-3-2)  Biophysics: An introduction to the basic principles of electricity, mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, and acoustics to living organisms and the biosphere. Beginning with the subatomic level, the basic knowledge of physics is used to understand the structure and function of macro-molecules, cellular organelles, the processes occurring within the cell, and behavior of organisms in the environment. The treatment of biological phenomena will be based on physical principles with appropriate mathematics when necessary.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 (may be taken concurrently) And PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122
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PHYS 311  (4-3-2)  Electricity and Magnetism I: An intermediate-level presentation of the principles and theories of electricity and magnetism, with applications of Maxwell equations and boundary value problems and with laboratory exercises complementing theory.
Prerequisite: MATH 331 And PHYS 122 And PHYS 211
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PHYS 312  (4-3-2)  Electricity and Magnetism II: An intermediate-level presentation of the principles and theories of electricity and magnetism, with emphasis on boundary value problems, collision processes, radiation, and relativity.
Prerequisite: PHYS 311
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PHYS 390  (3-3-0)  Fire Dynamics: An examination of fire dynamics within the context of firefighting and its application to fire situations, including combustion, flame spread, flashover, and smoke movement, as well as applications to building codes, large-loss fires, and fire modeling.
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