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Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015

CatalogUndergraduateCollege of Arts and SciencesBSCICourse Descriptions

Biological Sciences Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

BIOL 110  (4-3-2)  General Biology I: An introductory study of concepts relating to the origin of organisms: cell history, reproduction, structure and function; atomic and molecular structure of the cell; energy relations; structure, composition and systematics of major organic compounds; sexual and asexual reproduction; and genetics and evolution. Includes two (2) hours of lab consisting of qualitative experiments illustrating biological principles and basic laboratory techniques.
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BIOL 130  (4-3-2)  General Biology II: A study of ecology and of systems regulating and supporting the metabolism of organisms. Includes two (2) hours of lab consisting of qualitative experiments in ecology, classification, and the physiology of organisms.
Prerequisite: BIOL 110
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BIOL 150  (4-3-2)  Principles of Biology I: The study of the major principles relating to the nature of organisms, with emphasis on molecular, cellular, genetic, and evolutionary concepts, and with two (2) hours of lab consisting of experiments on the analysis of the chemistry of cellular and related materials.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 or higher level of MATH
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BIOL 160  (4-3-2)  Principles of Biology II: The study of the major principles relating to the nature of organisms, with emphasis on evolution, introducing the diversity and complexity of life at the macro-scale (survey of kingdoms and phyla). The course will include two (2) hours of lab consisting of observations and dissections of both plant and animal species and stressing the relationship between form and function.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150
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BIOL 200  (4-3-2)  Cellular Biology: An examination of cell structure in relation to function, including studies of biochemistry, cytogenetics, physiology, reproduction, and the evolution of animal, plant, and bacterial cells.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 (may be taken concurrently)
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BIOL 225  (3-3-0)  Scientific Communication: A course designed to introduce students to the principles of oral and written communication. Students will learn how to read, critique, and write a scientific paper; how to conduct literature searches; and how to prepare and present an oral scientific talk. In addition, the ethical issues related to scientific communications and scientific integrity will be discussed.
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BIOL 255  (4-3-2)  Principles of Microbiology: A course designed to introduce the structure, diversity, physiology, metabolism, and genetics of microorganisms. The role of microorganisms in disease and human health will be explored. Fundamental concepts of immunology, epidemiology, microbial pharmacology, and antibiotic resistance will also be covered. The course includes two (2) hours of lab consisting of applications of essential microbiological laboratory methods. An understanding of experimental design, scientific writing skills, and aseptic technique will also be assessed in lab. This course is designed for nursing and pre-nursing majors only. No other major at Fayetteville State University is permitted to use BIOL 255 to fulfill Natural Sciences requirements. Only nursing and pre-nursing majors are permitted to use BIOL 255 to fulfill support course requirements. This course does not meet the Microbiology course requirement for Biology, Biology Education, Biotechnology, Forensic Sciences, or pre-professional degree programs.
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BIOL 320  (1-0-2)  Biology Seminar: A course involving discussions of current topics in modern biology. Student presentations of papers on special issues in biology should be expected.
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BIOL 325  (3-2-2)  Molecular Biology: An in depth study of the structure, function, and biochemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Isolation, purification and structural modification of DNA and protein in laboratory exercises will be utilized to provide an understanding of the various DNA/protein methodologies and their applicability to forensic science. This course is cross listed with FORS 325.
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BIOL 330  (4-3-2)  Microbiology and Immunology: An introduction to the structure, physiology, ecology, and immunological host relationships of prokaryotes and other microorganisms, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of applications of microbiological and immunological techniques.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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BIOL 350  (3-2-2)  Ecology/Evolution: A study of mechanisms governing the process of organic evolution, evolutionary relationships among living and extinct organisms, and the interactions between organisms and their environment, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of an observational/experimental study of the concepts of evolution and ecology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And ZOOL 310
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BIOL 430  (3-3-0)  Special Problems: A course involving guided scientific research, field studies, or other special projects.
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BIOL 431  (3-2-2)  Population Genetics: A study of genetic and ecological forces that influence the structure of populations with two (2) hours of laboratory exercises and experimental studies. Students will evaluate the effects of random genetic drifts, mutations, natural selection, inbreeding, assortative mating, molecular evolution and quantitative/ecological genetics on populations. This course is cross listed with FORS 431
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BIOL 490  (4-3-2)  Radiation Biology: An introductory course for science majors on the nature and use of radioisotopes, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of basic experiments with radioisotopes using the latest instrumentation.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And MATH 241 And CHEM 211 And CHEM 212
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BOTN 210  (4-3-2)  General Botany: An introduction to the morphology, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, taxonomy, and ecology of higher plants, fungi, and algae, with two (2) hours of lab consisting of observation interpretation of the morphology and structure relating to the function, identification, and adaptation of higher plants, fungi, and algae.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
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BTCH 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Biotechnology: An introduction to the fundamentals of biotechnology and career options emphasizing the types of biotechnology workplaces and their unique requirements. The course includes a study of the use of mathematics, principles of instrumentation used, and analysis of measurements, solutions, centrifugation, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and electrophoresis. The importance of laboratory safety and precision will also be stressed.
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BTCH 220  (4-1-3)  Biotechniques I (formerly BTCH 420): A laboratory course in basic biotechnology theory, skills, and applications. Includes spectrophotometry, gel filtration chromatography, gel electrophoresis, DNA isolation, Restriction enzyme digestion, genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting, Southern and Western blot analysis.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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BTCH 230  (4-1-3)  Biotechniques II (formerly BTCH 430): A laboratory course teaching biotechnology theory, skills, and applications. Includes DNA sequencing, PCR, immunology, cell culture, separation technology, principles of fermentation technology, basic aptitudes for the biotechnology industry.
Prerequisite: BTCH 220 (formerly BTCH 420)
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BTCH 310  (3-3-0)  Immunology: Examines the components of the immune systems, immune responses, immune effectors, and immune diseases. Methods used in experimental studies of immunology are also introduced.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 (may be taken concurrently)
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BTCH 320  (3-3-0)  NanoBiotechnology: This introductory course is designed to explore applications of nanotechnology to biotechnology. Nanotechnology deals with materials and devices that are or have structures of a size between 1 to 100 nm. Students will be introduced with the nano-based labeling technologies, fabrication strategies, nanofoods and nanotoxicology. Design and working of the nanodevices will also be discussed for applications in therpeutics, agriculture, food and diagnostic areas. A thorough understanding of DNA proteins, carbohydrates and lipid molecules is expected of the students.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
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BTCH 340  (4-3-2)  Toxicology: Introduces the principles of toxicology. This course covers general concepts underlying the absorption, distribution, metabolism, action, and excretion of xenobiotics and the consequences to biological systems following exposure of toxicants, particularly the relevance to human health.
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162
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BTCH 350  (3-3-0)  Advanced Biomolecular Science: A seminar course which discusses pioneering and cutting edge research in molecular biology, cell biology, and developmental biology. Students will also be introduced to basic tools of biomolecular science.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And CHEM 141 And CHEM 142
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BTCH 360  (3-2-2)  Molecular Genetics: A study of the molecular definition of genes, gene sets, and gene expressions, with applications of gene functions to health, disease, and molecular evolution. Methods of gene analysis are studied with special reference to the human genome project and current genomic research.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or ZOOL 310 Or consent of the instructor
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BTCH 410  (3-3-0)  Biotechology Seminar: Discusses current topics and current research in biotechnology. Also includes review of the requirements and ethics of the biotechnology workplace and laboratory. Presentations will be required.
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BTCH 425  (3-3-0)  Bioinformatics: Introduces bioinformatics using computational methods to analyze and help interpret the content of large volumes of biological data generated by genome sequencing, DNA micro-arrays, proteomics, metabolites and metabolic fluxes. The computational methods used in this course include analysis of sequences, gene clustering, and pattern recognition/discovery in large scale expression data. Application of bioinformatics to drug design, and biotechnology will be discussed.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And (CHEM 220 Or CHEM 223)
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BTCH 435  (4-3-2)  Plant Biotechnology: This course provides an introduction to the theory, application, and techniques that are involved in plant cells and tissues and in the micro-propagation process. The course will also focus on the use of techniques in molecular biology in the study, development, and improvement of various plant species.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or BTCH 230
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BTCH 440  (4-1-5)  Tissue Culture and Hybridoma: A laboratory course which teaches techniques for the establishment, assay, and maintenance of a variety of types of cells, tissue and hybridoma cultures.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 Or BTCH 430
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BTCH 450  (3-3-0)  Problems in Biotechnology: A course designed to give students interactive exposure to and experience in biotechnology environments. Credit may be earned (with instructor approval) through one or more of the following: internships or cooperative experiences in biotechnology related sites, research project studying a biotechnology problem/question, research paper on a controversial biotechnology issue or procedure, or approved online or on-site course from on-site bio-works/biotechnology workplace programs. The course will also include a seminar sequence on workplace issues and ethics supported by on-site interview.
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BTCH 460  (4-2-2)  Introduction to Genomic Science: This course offers an introduction to the emerging field of genomics. The term "genome" describes the structure and content of the genetic make-up of an organism. Genomic science covers the study of the structure, organization, and function of genomes. Students will learn about the human genome project and related genome projects; sequence databases and analysis tools; functional genomics; and systems biology. Class lectures will be supplemented with hands-on laboratory and computer exercises.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 Or BTCH 360 Or BIOL 325 or the consent of the instructor
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BTCH 490  (4-0-8)  Research in Biotechnology: This course gives biotechnology students the opportunity to develop the skills needed to conduct research with minimum supervision. Students learn how to design an experiment, collect scientific information, prepare an outline of procedures, initiate the project, conduct the experiments specified, write a comprehensive scientific report, and make a presentation on the findings of the project. Biotechnology students in their Junior or Senior year will be eligible to enroll in this course. Students will work with a mentor willing to provide guidance and oversee the research project.
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FORS 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Forensic Science: This course introduces the basic principles and relationships between the applications of chemistry, biology, and physics to forensic science as they relate to the criminal investigative process. The course is designed to give students insight into the many areas of forensic science and to study the newest techniques used by forensic laboratories. Corequisite: PHYS 111 or PHYS 121
Prerequisite: CHEM 141 And CHEM 142 And CHEM 161 And CHEM 162 And BIOL 150 And PHYS 111 (may be taken concurrently) Or PHYS 112 (may be taken concurrently)
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FORS 300  (3-3-0)  Forensic Professional Practice: Provides basic knowledge of proper crime scene procedures and evidence processing that includes proper collection, documentation and preservation of physical evidence. In addition, the ethical issues relating to pre-trial procedures, courtroom testimony, and qualifications of expert witnesses will be presented.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And CRJC 202 (may be taken concurrently)
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FORS 325  (3-2-2)  Molecular Biology: An in-depth study of the structure, function, and biochemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Isolation, purification and structural modification of DNA and protein in laboratory exercises will be utilized to provide an understanding of the various DNA/protein methodologies and their applicability to forensic science. This course is cross listed with BIOL 325.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And CHEM 221 And CHEM 222 And ZOOL 310
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FORS 400  (4-3-2)  Forensic Microscopy: This course will familiarize students with the microscopy equipment common to most modern crime labs. The course will enable students to select mode-appropriate equipment and techniques and to make basic observations of the physical and optical properties of common evidential materials. This class is an introduction to microscopic analysis, identification, and characterization of materials, such as glass, hair, fiber, paint, and soil.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And PHYS 112 Or PHYS 122
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FORS 410  (3-3-0)  Technical Writing in Forensic Science: This course provides students with a working knowledge of various types of technical and scientific communication, including writing proposals, instructions, and forensic reports for both specialist and nonspecialist. It aims to enable the students to present information professionally in clear, concise and appropriate format. It deals with ethical issues involved in professional technical writing. Formal elements of reports with library research are also emphasized.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And FORS 300
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FORS 420  (4-3-2)  Forensic Chemistry I: Applications of spectroscopic methods to forensic science. Background and applications of ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transfer infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy will be discussed. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in chemistry.
Prerequisite: FORS 200 And FORS 300 And CHEM 222 Corequisite: FORS 400
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FORS 430  (4-3-2)  Forensic Chemistry II: Applications of separation methods to forensic science. Techniques covered will include gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in chemistry.
Prerequisite: FORS 420
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FORS 431  (3-2-2)  Population Genetics: A study of genetic and ecological forces that influence the structure of populations with two (2) hours of laboratory exercises and experimental studies. Students will evaluate the effects of random genetic drifts, mutations, natural selection, inbreeding, assortative mating, molecular evolution and quantitative/ecological genetics on populations. This course is cross listed with BIOL 431.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 410
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FORS 445  (4-2-4)  Forensic Serology: This course will introduce the concepts, theories, and principles used in the forensic identification of biological evidence, including laboratory analysis of physical properties for the identification, confirmation, and species origin of biological materials such as blood, fibers, hair, saliva, and semen, as well as immunological and microscopic techniques. The course applies methods that are used in forensic laboratories. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in biology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200 And FORS 200 And FORS 300 Corequisite: FORS 400
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FORS 450  (4-2-4)  Forensic DNA Analysis: This course will introduce the concepts, theories, and principles used in the forensic identification of biological evidence. The course will cover the characterization of body fluids including the determination of their human origin. Hands on laboratory techniques will be used to identify biological fluids for DNA extraction, quantitation, amplification, profiling, and interpretation. The course introduces laboratory methods, techniques, and instruments used in similar forensic laboratories. May only be taken by students majoring in forensic science with a concentration in biology.
Prerequisite: FORS 325 And FORS 445
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FORS 460  (4-0-8)  Capstone: This course will evaluate students' overall understanding and mastery of forensic science and criminal justice theories and applications of various laboratory techniques for evidence identification, application of analytical techniques, and communication skills. The course will enable students to select the most appropriate equipment and techniques to make basic observations of physical evidence and test this evidence by using the appropriate equipment and techniques of evidential materials analysis.
Prerequisite: FORS 410 And FORS 430 Or FORS 450 And FORS 431
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MEDI 200  (2-2-0)  Medical Terminology: A comprehensive study of the language of medicine, including the use of the terms in the various areas of medical science.
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NSCI 120  (4-3-2)  Modern Biology: An introductory course covering basic biological concepts that provides the student with a comprehensive survey of biological sciences. Some important areas which will be investigated are: cell structure and reproduction, energy relationships at the cellular level, genetics, DNA, evolution, ecology, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animal organ systems.
Prerequisite: NSCI 110
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ZOOL 200  (4-3-2)  General Zoology: A study of concepts of animal biology relative to structure, function, ecology, heredity, and embryogenesis, with emphasis on the evolution and characteristics of major animal phyla, and with two (2) hours of laboratory studies relative to basic concepts of animal biology.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150 And BIOL 160
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ZOOL 210  (4-3-2)  Anatomy and Physiology I: A systematic study of the structures and functions of musculoskeletal, neural, and integumentary systems of the human body, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies on the structures and functions of the human body's composite systems.
Prerequisite: BIOL 150
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ZOOL 230  (4-3-2)  Anatomy and Physiology II: A systematic study of the structures and functions of the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems of the human body, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies on the structure and function of the human body's composite systems.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 210
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ZOOL 310  (3-2-2)  Principles of Genetics: A study of the fundamental concepts and principles of Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and the application of genetic technologies, with two hour laboratory experiments and exercises designed to reinforce and deepen students’ understanding of basic concepts and principles of genetics and to provide an opportunity to obtain hands-on experimental and problem solving skills.
Prerequisite: BOTN 210 And ZOOL 200
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ZOOL 350  (3-2-2)  Comparative Anatomy: A comprehensive study of the anatomy of chordates, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of anatomical systems of representative chordates.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
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ZOOL 370  (3-3-2)  Vertebrate Physiology: A study of the functions and functional relationships of organs and organ systems of vertebrates, especially humans, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of an introduction to laboratory techniques used for studying the physiology of vertebrates.
Prerequisite: BIOL 200
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ZOOL 430  (4-3-2)  Animal Development: A study of principles of animal development, including cellular and tissue assembly, embryogenesis, and reconstitutive development, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of descriptive and experimental studies of the development of representative vertebrate embryos.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 370
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ZOOL 450  (3-2-2)  Histology and Microtechniques: A study of the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs, embracing both morphological and physiological aspects of normal human structures, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies consisting of a introduction to histological techniques employing the use of permanently fixed and stained slides and to the preparation of tissues in a manner suitable for viewing with a compound microscope.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 370
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ZOOL 470  (3-2-2)  Introduction to Entomology: A study of the evolution, anatomy, development, ecology, and systematics of insects, the role of insects as vectors of diseases; and the influences of insects on history and culture, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies in insect physiology, morphology, ecology, and behavior, and with an assigned project on the identification of local insects.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 200
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ZOOL 485  (3-2-2)  Introduction to Parasitology: A study of the biology of parasites, their host relationships, and their importance to humankind, unicellular and multicellular parasites of human being and other animals, with two (2) hours of laboratory studies involving including both unicellular and multicellular parasites of human beings and other animals.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 200
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