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Graduate Catalog 2013-2014

CatalogGraduateCourse Descriptions

Course Descriptions - Graduate

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

ACCT 550  (3-3-0)  Principles of Accounting: This course provides a background in both the concepts and practice of accounting that assist management in the decision making process. Contemporary accounting scandals in financial reporting and statement analysis are examined, as well as the proper use of product costing in planning and controlling operations, and special reports and analysis.
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ACCT 610  (3-3-0)  Managerial Accounting: The primary objective of the course is to enable the student to make effective use of management accounting data within his/her own organization or business practice. A secondary objective is to develop the analytical skills necessary to diagnose complex business issues in an accounting context. In addition, the course touches on global issues facing corporations such as transfer pricing and outsourcing. The course also introduces student to management accounting practices across borders and compares these practices to US practice (such as budgeting, value chain management, pricing).
Prerequisite: ACCT 550 Or equivalent
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ACCT 650  (3-3-0)  International Accounting: The study of international dimensions of accounting and control; international business and multinational strategy; accounting systems and global environment; the comparative International Accounting systems and practices including comparative International Analysis of financial statements; International Disclosure Trends and Financial Analysis; Management Control of Global operations; International Taxation; and External Auditing of foreign operations.
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ACCT 670  (3-3-0)  Internal and Operational Audit: A detailed and critical study of the changing audit environment relative to financial statement, auditing, internal auditing, compliance auditing, and operational auditing. This is an in-depth study of the roles of the Securities and Exchange Commission with particular emphasis on the Securities Acts of 1933 and 1934. The course is an extensive research work in auditing.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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ACCT 695  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Accounting: Discussion by students and faculty of selected contemporary topics in accounting applying intensive individual research to accounting issues facing management.
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BADM 530  (3-3-0)  Principles of Business Statistics: This course introduces the foundation of probability and statistics used in management and covers the basics of data analysis and display, descriptive measures, random variables, and probability distributions and then introduces statistical inference and its use in decision-making. The course seeks application-oriented understanding regression analysis and develops the ability to design, estimate, evaluate, and interpret statistical models.
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BADM 602  (3-3-0)  Directed Research: Research of special interest by advanced students under the supervision of a member of the MBA faculty. Work may represent either an intensive investigation of a particular problem in theory or a survey of a field of Business Administration and Economics not otherwise addressed in the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
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BADM 603  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Business: A study of a current topic of special interest in business.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
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BADM 604  (3-3-0)  International Business Law: A study of public law of International trade, investment restrictions, technology transfer law, and other politics control over international law such as, law of treaties and the law of international and intergovernmental organizations, comparative analysis of international sales law, licensing of patents, copyrights and trademarks, federal corrupt practices act, North American Free Trade Agreement and investment law in developing countries.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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BICH 610  (3-3-0)  Advanced Biochemistry: A study of the intermediary metabolism of amino acids nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, with emphasis on metabolic pathways and their associated enzymes.
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BIOL 610  (3-3-0)  Endocrinology: A comprehensive study of anatomy, physiology, and patho-physiology of endocrine glands in animals with particular emphasis on humans. The course will examine the current research on hormone-related problems in humans such as stress that leads to cardiovascular and gastroenteric diseases.
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BIOL 620  (1-1-2)  Seminar: Presentations by faculty, students, and visiting scientists on current research in various specialty areas of biology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
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BIOL 630  (3-3-0)  Topics in Biology: Studies of current topics in various areas of biology, with emphasis on significant advancements. May be repeated under different subtitles.
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BIOL 640  (3-3-0)  Comparative Physiology: A comparative study of the organ systems of vertebrates and the physiological processes involved in maintaining the homeostasis.
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BIOL 650  (3-3-2)  Communities and Ecosystems: A study of interactions between species, community structure, nutrient and energy flow in ecosystems, and geographical ecology.
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BIOL 660  (3-3-0)  Evolution: A study of the history of life, evolutionary relationships among organisms, mechanisms of evolution, and speciation.
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BIOL 670  (3-2-2)  Physiology: An analysis of the functions of major organ systems, especially in mammals, with attention to and discussions of current research articles published in the American Journal of Physiology.
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BIOL 680  (3-2-2)  Radiation Biology: A study of the procedures and applications of the principles of atomic radiation, including methods, means of detection, measurement, and utilization in research.
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BIOL 690  (1-1-0)  Research and Thesis: Independent investigation work on an approved program reported in a prescribed written form. A total of six (6) credit hours required, taken in blocks of (1) to (6) hours.
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BIOL 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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BOTN 620  (3-2-2)  Advanced Botany: A study of the metabolism of plant growth and morphogenesis with special emphasis on such aspects as plant hormones, tropisms, water relations, circadian rhythms, and phytochrome, as well as on the field characteristics, collection, and identification of vascular plants, with intensive study of selected families and genera.
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BOTN 630  (3-2-2)  Plant Development: A study of the developmental anatomy of seed plants, including examinations of the seed structure, seedling development, ontogeny and structure of the primary body, secondary body, flowers, and fruits.
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BOTN 640  (3-2-2)  Advanced Microbiology: A study of the taxonomic, morphological, cultural, and physiological characteristics of important groups of heterotrophic microorganisms, such as the spore forming group, the pseudomonades, the staphylococcusmicrococcus group, and the enteric forms, with emphasis on the isolation, characterization, and study of groups of heterotrophic microorganisms.
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BOTN 650  (3-2-2)  Plant Genetics and Genomics: This course is a graduate level course intended to acquaint the student with recent advances in plant genomics and statistical genomics with applications to agriculture. Principles and methods for constructing genetic maps comprised of molecular and other genetic markers, and methods for mapping genes underlying phenotypically complex traits are studied. Methods of DNA sequencing, physical mapping, genomic libraries construction, and positional cloning are also discussed.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
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CPM 610  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Project Management: This course focuses on how projects contribute to the strategic goals of the organization. The linkages of integration include the process of selecting projects that best support the strategy of a particular organization and that in turn can be supported by the technical and managerial processes made available by the organization to bring projects to completion. The topics include the complete life cycle of projects including defining, planning, execution and delivery of projects. It also talks about estimating time and costs, managing resources, and risk management. The international and future issues of project management will be discussed.
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CPM 620  (3-3-0)  Communication and Procurement in Project Management: This course looks at purchasing and contracting of goods and services and how appropriate terms and conditions can favorably impact objectives. The course also examines the impact of leadership on attainment of goals; with particular emphasis on consensus versus autocratic styles, transparency of decision making, and accountability from the leader. Various human resource policies will be examined in relationship to projects which have beginning and end dates versus manufacturing and office environments. Ethics and moral issues will also be explored in context of different motivations of labor and management. Cultural clashes will also be explored for multinational environments.
Prerequisite: CPM 610
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CPM 630  (3-3-0)  Tools and Techniques of Project Management: This course starts with manual techniques to manage time, costs, human resources, and quality control and then proceeds to explore current software solutions. Additionally students will review and examine forecasting, estimating, budgeting, and auditing methods both from a theoretical and practical basis. Students will learn the analysis techniques used to evaluate compliance to objectives and how to correct for deviation from plan.
Prerequisite: CPM 610
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CPM 640  (3-3-0)  Project Risk Management: Students will learn to explore the internal and external variables that will impact the successful execution and completion of the project. This course will identify, qualify, and quantify risks such as manpower, cost, technology, quality, politics, logistics, etc. Those risks will be evaluated to determine their impact and what effect they will have on the minimizing, maximizing, or optimizing the key elements needed for the success of the project.
Prerequisite: CPM 610
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CRJC 501  (3-3-0)  Foundations in Criminal Justice Systems: This graduate course offers an overview of the three major components of the criminal justice system: (a) policing, (b) courts, and (c) corrections. It will provide a survey of relevant theoretical perspectives for understanding how economic, political, and ideological forces shape systematic and officially sanctioned responses to crime through these individual components. Students will be expected to become familiar with both classic and recent important contributions to the scientific literature covering policing, courts, and corrections. The course will culminate with a critical examination of how these components function together to produce contemporary criminal justice practice.
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CRJC 510  (3-3-0)  Criminal Justice Administration: This course is an introduction to the theoretical discourse of administration as applied to criminal justice. In this course, considerable attention will be on the theories of administration, but the emphasis of this course will be the application of administrative theory to criminal justice organizations and contexts. Areas of theoretical discourse covered will include classical/neo-classical, principles of administration, human resources, systems, cultural reform, and sense-making. Additional readings will provide examples of the application of administrative theories to criminal justice organizations and contexts.
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CRJC 520  (3-3-0)  Criminological Theory I: Classical and Positivist Theorists: This course is the first of two required graduate seminars in criminological theory. The course begins with a survey of the history and application of criminological thought, providing a foundation for analysis of the assumptions, elements and policy implications of theories of crime and criminal justice. As the first of two graduate theory seminars, this course focuses on theories within two major paradigms in criminological theory: Classical and Positivist Criminology. We explore the perspectives on crime and criminal justice that permeate public discourse on crime and justice and critique the formal criminological theories to which these everyday perspectives are linked. We consider whether existing research provides support for widely accepted theories and we examine the criminal justice policies associated with different criminological theories. Students are guided in the process of formulating their own research questions and policy proposals from the criminological theories that they find most compelling.
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CRJC 521  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Criminological Thought: This course is a graduate seminar in criminological theory. It is an introduction to theory in criminology and criminal justice, beginning with an examination of the process of theory construction and the relationship between theory and research methodology. Students explore the history of criminological thought, examining the assumptions, elements and policy implications of classic and contemporary theories of crime and criminal justice within three major paradigms: Classical, Positivist and Critical Criminology. Students consider the level of research support that exists for widely accepted theories and examine the criminal justice policies associated with different criminological theories. Students are guided in the process of formulating research questions and policy proposals from criminological theories.
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CRJC 530  (3-3-0)  Criminological Theory II: Critical Criminology: This course is the second of two required graduate seminars in criminological theory. The course begins with a review of the history and application of criminological thought, which provides a foundation for continued analysis of the assumptions, elements, and policy implications of theories of crime and criminal justice. We begin our deeper analysis of theories where the first theory seminar left off, with the third major paradigm in criminological theory: Critical Criminology. We explore theories of crime and criminal justice that are found in public discourse and critique the criminological theories to which these everyday perspectives are linked. We consider whether existing research provides support for specific theories and we examine the criminal justice policies associated with different criminological theories. Students are guided in the process of formulating their own research questions and policy proposals from the criminological theories that they find most compelling.
Prerequisite: CRJC 520
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CRJC 531  (3-3-0)  Advanced Seminar in Criminological Theory: This course in an advanced graduate seminar in criminological theory. It is designed for students who have had prior graduate level exposure to criminological theory and research methods, and who want to deepen their understanding of criminological theory and the relationship between theory and research methodology. Students are guided in the process of conducting in-depth analysis of selected theoretical perspectives on crimes and criminal justice and in critically evaluating the conceptual, logical, and empirical adequacies and inadequacies of the selected theories. In addition, significant attention will be given to helping students develop theory driven research ideas that they may pursue as master’s thesis projects or as dissertation projects, for those who intend to pursue doctoral level work in the future.
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CRJC 540  (3-3-0)  Research Methods in Criminal Justice: This course provides students with the fundamental tools for evaluating, designing and implementing basic and applied empirical research within the area of criminal justice. The association between theories and research methods used in the study of criminal justice is explored through a variety of related data sources. Topics covered include: the principles of research design; problems of inference; survey design; and basic methods of data analysis. Students will obtain hands-on experience in project design and data analysis.
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CRJC 550  (3-3-0)  Statistical Applications in Criminal Justice: This is a required course which provides a foundation for the use of statistical methods in criminal justice and public affairs research. It will review fundamentals of research, showing the interplay between the research, the statistical method, and the interpretation. The course includes a lab that involves computerized data analysis.
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CRJC 570  (3-3-0)  Race, Crime and Justice: The course will examine research exploring the involvement of racial minorities in crime and the treatment of racial minorities by the criminal justice system. The course will also provide an in-depth examination of the inequalities within the criminal justice system and its relationship to structural inequalities within the wider society. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical debates on the disparities in law and justice based on race and class. Topics include: wrongful convictions and racial prejudice; the war on drugs and the politics of race. Case study materials focus on current debates of seminal issues.
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CRJC 580  (3-3-0)  Females, Crime and Justice: Theory and practice have focused on perceptions of male scholars and practitioners and discussions about male offenders. It was not until the 1970s that crime affecting women and girls and more serious inclusion of women criminal justice scholars and practitioners was given more attention. This course will focus on female experiences as offenders, victims, and workers within the criminal justice system. Additionally, we will explore treatment programs that have been proposed to decrease female-perpetrated crime in both a historical and contemporary context.
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CRJC 590  (3-3-0)  Ethics in Criminal Justice: This course is an intensive examination of different ethical and moral issues/dilemmas that we face within and outside of criminal justice systems when dealing with people who either work for or come contact with the system. Emphasis will be on exploration of ethical/moral issues related to crime, criminal justice practice, education, and research.
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CRJC 600  (3-3-0)  Corporate and Government Crime: Study of criminal behaviors by corporation and government leaders, with an emphasis on events impacting the people of the United States. The course explores the nature and extent of these criminal behaviors, the causes associated with them, their harm to people and societies, and strategies to reduce the number of events and/ or their harmful impacts.
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CRJC 605  (3-3-0)  Community Policing: This graduate course offers an overview of relevant theoretical perspectives for understanding the origins, evolution, and practice of community policing. Students will be expected to become familiar with both classic and recent important contributions to the scientific literature covering community policing. This course will introduce students to the dynamics of policing as s science, and will address strategies of policing the many diverse populations in America as well as the contemporary issues that face them. Students will explore policing reforms such as community policing, Problem Oriented Policing, Neighborhood Policing, and Strategic Policing. Students also will address issues that face the police on a daily basis, such as profiling, use of force, gratuities, and corruption.
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CRJC 610  (3-3-0)  Organizational Change in Criminal Justice: Organizational change is inevitable, and often necessary. For criminal justice organizations, often change is badly needed and/or poorly managed. In this course, several key theoretical approaches to guiding organizational change will be examined and applied to criminal justice organizations. Readings will focus on helping recognize the need for change, making change-resistant organizations into learning organizations, and how to lead the change efforts, as well as offering examples of theoretical application of these ideas to criminal justice organizations.
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CRJC 620  (3-3-0)  Juvenile Delinquency and Justice: This course will take a critical approach in examining different issues related to juvenile delinquency and justice. Theoretical aspects of juvenile deviant/delinquent behavior, and societal reactions and institutional responses to young law violators will be addressed. Finally, different prevention approaches and strategies will be evaluated.
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CRJC 630  (3-3-0)  Communities, Justice and Social Change: This course is a graduate seminar on communities, justice and social change in the contemporary urban context. In this course, we give focused attention to "hard-hit" communities, i.e. communities where both crime and criminal justice activity exist in concentrated levels. We consider the impacts of crime on neighborhoods and communities, and we also examine the impacts that traditional criminal justice practices have on these communities. Strategies for empowering local communities to improve the quality of life and the quality of justice in the urban environment are explored.
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CRJC 640  (3-3-0)  Qualitative Methods in Criminal Justice: This course provides an introduction to qualitative research methods and how they are often applied in the study of crime and justice. Qualitative methods includes a wide variety of challenging techniques such as participant observation, ethnography, interviewing, field interviews, historical analysis, case studies, and textual analysis. The course will explore these various techniques as well as the uses, strengths and limitations of qualitative research. In addition, the course content will include designing, conducting, and writing up qualitative research. Finally, the process of grounded theory construction is explored.
Prerequisite: CRJC 540
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CRJC 650  (3-3-0)  Program Evaluation in Criminal Justice: This course will familiarize students with key components of program evaluation in criminal justice organizations and contexts. This course will combine aspects of social research methodology and applied research techniques and skills to the context of the practice of criminal justice. Students who successfully complete this course should expect to be able to perform evaluative services to their current and/or future agencies.
Prerequisite: CRJC 540 And CRJC 550
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CRJC 660  (3-3-0)  Current Issues in Victimology: Victims’ issues largely have been ignored within the criminal justice system and the field of criminal justice academia until recently (the last 30 years). As crime victims are an integral component to eradicating and/or dealing with crime it is important that the myriad issues surrounding this diverse population be explored. This course will look at three main areas concerning victimology: 1) the effects or impact of crime victimization; 2) provision of assistance to crime victims and the criminal justice system - victim interaction; and 3) victim-oriented legislation and victims’ bills of rights. Students will be called to investigate, in depth, how criminal justice agencies help or hinder victim recovery, as well as evaluate the effectiveness of victim serving agencies in relation to the different states’ victims’ bill of rights.
Prerequisite: CRJC 540
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CRJC 670  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: This variable topics course will offer students the opportunity to explore specialized areas of criminal justice on a variety of criminal justice subjects. The topics vary from semester to semester. The course can be repeated up to three times as long as the subject matter is different.
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CRJC 690  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: This course allows students to examine an area of crimnal justice not covered (or not covered in detail) in the core elective courses.
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CRJC 691  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: This course allows students to examine an area of criminal justice not covered (or not covered in detail) in the core or elective courses.
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CRJC 698  (3-0-0)  Thesis I: An extensive research experience in an approved topic of choice.
Prerequisite: CRJC 501 And CRJC 521 And CRJC 540 And CRJC 550
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CRJC 699  (3-0-0)  Thesis II: Continued work on the approved topic of choice begun in CRJC 698.
Prerequisite: CRJC 698
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CRJC 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students who have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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CSC 501  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Computer Science: In-depth studies of selected topics in areas of computer science not covered in other computer courses, such as software, hardware utilization, programming languages, numerical methods, syntactic descriptions, symbolic functions, and manipulations, with course requirements including one or more of the following: readings in the literature and research on computer science, introductory research projects, major computer programming projects, seminars, or new course development.
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ECON 540  (3-3-0)  Fundamentals of Economics: This course explores the application of microeconomic theory to management decisions and examines the consequences of macroeconomic policies upon businesses in the global market place.
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ECON 610  (3-3-0)  Managerial Economics: The application of economic theory and quantitative methods to an analysis of managerial decision-making in national and international settings. Topics include empirical estimation of demand functions, cost and production functions, product pricing, application of cost-benefit analysis to non-profit sector, risk analysis, technology change management and plant selection strategies in a global economy.
Prerequisite: ECON 540 Or equivalent
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ECON 650  (3-3-0)  International Trade and Financial Markets: This course deals with practical aspects of international trade and financial markets. It treats the international consequences of changes in money supply or demand, prices, and interest rates. The role and importance of the institution and individual participants will be discussed.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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ECON 660  (3-3-0)  Business and Economic Forecasting: Advanced study of the science and art of model building for the purpose of forecasting and policy analysis. Forecasting models are critically examined and applied to the managerial decision making problems using standard computer programs.
Prerequisite: ECON 610
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EDAM 650  (3-3-0)  Educational Leadership Development Seminar: This seminar is an introductory graduate course in educational leadership for prospective leaders at all levels of the school organization. Elements of effective leadership, standards-based educational leadership, role conceptions, and personal leadership vision will be presented. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to develop into a successful, innovative educational leader. Students will apply this knowledge to build and embrace their philosophical and theoretical frameworks as prospective school leaders. Clinical experiences in school and district settings will be required.
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EDAM 651  (3-3-0)  Organizational Development and Diversity for School Leaders: This course is designed to study multicultural education and its link to school leadership, cultural understanding, and critical problems related to the organization of schools through the lens of human behavior. A focus is on the preparation of administrators to transform schools by understanding theoretical, sociological, political, and historical elements as they relate to ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, exceptionality, language, religion, and sexual orientation. In preparation for work in an increasingly diverse world, students in this course will engage in personal, professional, and organizational reflextion.
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EDAM 652  (3-3-0)  School-Based Program Evaluation and Improvement: The focus of this course is to provide the student with a variety of opportunities to apply data analysis procedures using real or simulated school data sets. The student will be introduced to qualitative and quantitative methods and how these tools can be utilized to evaluate and improve school performance and program improvement. The student will use the following data types: student performance, teacher and community survey, and state and or local reports. The student will be required to work with school-based personnel as part of their field experiences to collect, analyze, and interpret relevant school improvement data. The student will be able to analyze the data to facilitate school improvement decision-making and the development of real and simulated school improvement plans.
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EDAM 660  (3-3-0)  Leadership and Organizational Theories in Schools: An analysis of the various leadership and organizational theories with a major focus on situational decision-making and its effects. The course explores and tests (through required field-based clinical activities) leadership skills and strategies necessary for effective school leadership. The student engages in an in-depth review of the literature relevant to effective organizational change and analysis as a foundation for the development of change strategies. Field-based clinical experiences will require students to identify issues affecting the school; leadership and organizational theory will frame discussion of the issues. In addition to observation in a variety of school settings, clinical experiences may include participation in board meetings and school advisory boards.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the MSA degree program and EDAM 650
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EDAM 661  (3-3-0)  School Law and Public Policy Issues: This course is designed to review laws that pertain to public schools, including constitutional laws, state laws and court decisions that have helped to shape school law. A focus is on the study of court decisions addressing the legal principles affecting education, schools, and school professionals. Constitutional, statute, and administrative laws related to education are examined and analyzed through case studies and the analysis of case law. Students are expected to complete analyses of recent state and federal judicial decisions and legal structures related to responsibility and accountability of school leaders. The course engages the student in an examination of the school system as a policy system and the implementation of these policies by the school leader at the building level. Focus areas include: relationships of local school district policies to state policies, constraints imposed by state policies, implications of the state local system for local control, and effects of community expectations and participation in policy making at the school district and building levels.
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EDAM 670  (3-3-0)  Resource Management and Schools: This course is designed to provide an examination of the theory and practice of human resource management and public school finance in relation to expenditures and resources at the local, state and federal levels of support in school districts. It also provides an examination of social issues that impact the school learning environment, to include gender, quality, multicultural education, diversity; and privatization. It provides an in-depth study of the basic principles of money management in public education and how to manage it. The primary focus is on the management of dollars (fiscal), space (building operations), people (human resources), community resources (engagement) and time. The course addresses the issue of equity and adequacy in funding public schools and advancing the critical importance of data driven decision-making that maximizes learning.
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EDAM 671  (3-3-0)  Leadership for Learning: This course provides the student with an introduction to the philosophical and social foundations of curriculum in schools. The student will be exposed to those foundational philosophical and social theories that have driven the development of school curricula. The student will be introduced to and utilize school improvement practices that focus on teaching for learning. Special emphasis will be given to researched-based improvement practices that include effective leadership behaviors and teaching pedagogy. The student will participate with other school-based personnel to observe, analyze, and interpret school data to develop learning improvement plans. The student will be able to analyze school-based approaches to teaching for learning and make improvement recommendations in real and simulated school improvement planning situations.
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EDAM 680  (3-3-0)  Internship Part I: An exploratory summer field experience will afford opportunities for interns to make site visits to exemplary school sites and programs. This course is a
Prerequisite: EDAM 650 And EDAM 651 And EDAM 652 And EDAM 660 And EDAM 661 And EDAM 670
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EDAM 690  (6-0-6)  Internship Part II: Internship Part II is the first semester of a full time year-long administrative experience. The course provides interns with opportunities to develop insight into administrative processes focusing on skills of observation and diagnosis while shadowing site administrators and mentors/coaches. Weekly seminars with participating faculty members are devoted to analysis and discussion of the intern's field experiences and conferencing with site administrators.
Prerequisite: EDAM 680
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EDAM 691  (6-0-6)  Internship Part III: Internship Part III is the second semester of a full time year-long administrative experience. The course provides interns with opportunities to develop insight into administrative processes focusing on skills of observation and diagnosis while shadowing site administrators and mentors/coaches. Weekly seminars with participating faculty members are devoted to analysis and discussion of the intern's field experiences and conferencing with site administrators.
Prerequisite: EDAM 690 Or EDAM 690
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EDAM 698  (3-3-0)  Computer Usage for Educational Administrators: This course is designed to enhance the computer literacy of educational administrators in the field of education and provide exposure to a wide spectrum of electronic technology in administration and a classroom setting. Attention will be paid to technologies that permit access to all branches of education. This will include networks and bulletin boards, interactive voice, visual interactions, data and image transmission, designing and implementing instructional and administrative procedures. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of computer skills in word processing, data management, spreadsheets, graphics and courseware applications and authoring tools.
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EDAM 699  (3-3-0)  Pre-Doctoral Admin Studies: A part of the Pre-Doctoral Institute offered each summer for graduate students who have been admitted to the doctoral program in educational leadership and for those interested in doctoral level studies, EDAM 699 introduces students to doctoral-level graduate study through a variety of experiences focusing on contemporary organizational theory, organizational change and inquiry methods. The topic around which the experiences will revolve is the development of schools as learning organizations. Students will study contemporary organizational concepts such as Senge's learning organization and their application to public schools. They will study and discuss strategies for organizational change in schools with invited guest speakers from the field. Finally, students will be introduced to methods of inquiry including an overview to research methods, the library and its paper and electronic information sources and the Internet.
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EDLE 700  (3-3-0)  Culturally Proficient Leadership: Focus on awareness of leader's social group memberships and impact of these identities upon leadership skills, personal awareness of multiple forms of oppression and impact on leadership ability. Discussion of leadership strengths and challenges: managing conflict, resistance, and group-leader dynamics.
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EDLE 701  (3-3-0)  Cultural Diversity in American Schools: The course addresses the origins, concepts, principles, and trends in multicultural education. It provides candidates with an understanding of multicultural education as an instructional concept, educational reform movement, and systemic process.
Prerequisite: EDLE 700 And EDLE 706 And EDLE 720
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EDLE 703  (3-3-0)  Public Policy and Political Issues In Education: Candidates study political and educational policy processes in relation to such problems as globalization and the nation- state, local, and community development, social identification and political participation, pressure groups and indoctrination, academic freedom, and school reforms.
Prerequisite: EDLE 701 And EDLE 704 And EDLE 721
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EDLE 704  (3-3-0)  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership: This course examines the social and philosophical foundations of curriculum, and curriculum theory. The course prepares candidates to understand the politics of curriculum development.
Prerequisite: EDLE 700 And EDLE 706 And EDLE 720
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EDLE 705  (3-3-0)  The Planning and Financing of Educational Organizations: This course is an in-depth examination of school planning and implementation of the financial perspective at local, district, and state levels. Included are the traditional methods of financing and the emergent ideas and subsequent suggested practices to meet the needs of a changing national educational environment. Also addressed are the areas of financing of school corporations in the current economic and political setting with emphasis on interrelationships of educational, economic, and political decisions.
Prerequisite: EDLE 701 And EDLE 704 And EDLE 721
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EDLE 706  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Educational Leadership: In this course, candidates investigate forces and trends that are influencing the nature of schooling and learning in a global society. Candidates explore futurist literature and the importance of holding a compelling vision for the future as an educational leader. They explore strategies for facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the learning community.
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EDLE 707  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Legal Issues, Critical Race Theory and Professional: This course focuses on Legal Issues and Professional Ethics of particular concern to education policy-makers and central office school administrators. Federal and North Carolina school law will be included with attention given both to theoretical and practical concerns. This course also focuses on critical race theory as a critique of racism and the law in U.S. society and discusses its current applications to education policy and research in K-12 schooling and higher education; looks at how critical race theory can be used as a methodological lens for policy analysis and educational research; examines the social aspects of leadership in moral terms.
Prerequisite: EDLE 703 And EDLE 705
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EDLE 708  (3-3-0)  Organizational Theory and Administrative Behavior: In this course candidates examine schools as institutions from an organizational perspective. It critiques the field of organizational theory in order to better understand how schools function the way they do by turning to studies in business about organizational structure and culture. Candidates will develop the tools to look at organizational behavior from a critical perspective, which will provide a basis for understanding the status quo of any organization and the dynamics for change. The awareness of gender issues and cross-cultural issues that affect the modern organizational climate is emphasized.
Prerequisite: EDLE 703 And EDLE 705
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EDLE 709  (3-3-0)  University College Teaching: An examination of philosophies, methodologies, and related issues (gender, race, et.al) that influence teaching and learning in college and university classroom settings. Emphasis is on teaching effectiveness, the application of course material to the formal classroom environment, assessment, and standards.
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EDLE 710  (3-3-0)  The Adult Learner: The focus of this course will be on the examination of how adults learn in instructional settings. Characteristics of the adult learner will be examined. Students will investigate adult learning theory as well as current trends and advancements in adult learning. The focus will be on making better instructional decisions and media selections for the education and training of adults.
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EDLE 711  (3-3-0)  Emerging Issues in Leadership and Supervision: This course will introduce doctoral students to the role of an institutional leader and supervisor in the Twenty-First Century, and on how leadership continues to evolve in the changing expectations of individuals in the organizations, in which senior and upper level administrators reign. Senior and upper level leaders must be able to communicate skillfully both orally and in writing with all stakeholders. In addition, they are expected to model collaborative decision-making skills as they negotiate the political landscape, work with diverse groups of constituents, while addressing retention and graduation rates. Whether the leader is K-12 or Post-secondary education, they both face the same or similar issues with faculty, students, board and trustee members, and the general public. Through readings, discussion forums, chats, blogs, emails, interviews, case studies, in-baskets issues, simulations, videos, and other electronic tools, this on-line course will provide doctoral students with the skills, understandings, and dispositions of a senior and upper level administrator. Attention is also given to the role of the superintendent and higher education administrator in goal setting, developing and implementing long-range plans in response to current and emerging issues within the academic community, as well as, the broader spectrum of state and national educational issues.
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EDLE 712  (3-3-0)  History of Higher Education: Candidates examine the history of higher education, particularly in the United States. Candidates examine the aims and institutional forms of higher education. The nature of academic pursuits in terms of the development of disciplines and fields of study and the development of the professoriate are examined.
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EDLE 720  (3-3-0)  Educational Statistics: This course will cover the application of basic statistical procedures to the decision making process. The student will learn the most widely-used statistical procedures and how they support managerial decision-making and organizational change processes. The course includes Parieto Analysis, Ishikawa Diagrams, statistical process control, charting, presentation, the communication of statistical information; and touches on experimental design in the managerial context. Emphasis will be on research conducted in schools by presenting methods that are appropriate for school-based research. Educational leadership is evolving to place added emphasis upon teacher, parent and student empowerment, which will have fundamental consequences for administrative practice. In the future, administrators will need skills in projecting budget expenses for programs developed by this consortium of participants. To share power will require the educational leader to be skillful in interpreting and sharing research findings with these participants. This course will be the introduction to the development of an educational leader able to evaluate design and conduct educational research to deal with the changing school.
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EDLE 721  (3-3-0)  Research, Design, and Evaluation Methodology: This course is designed to teach the student how to match the research design to the substantive problem in education without further distorting the problem. The first one half of the course will cover the basics of research design. The second half of the course will cover program evaluation. Future school administrators will be provided the information they need to conduct or supervise instructional program evaluation. The program evaluations component will be based on the material covered in the first half of the class. The student will have taken statistics and be knowledgeable of the basics of test and measurement.
Prerequisite: EDLE 700 And EDLE 706 And EDLE 720
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EDLE 722  (3-3-0)  Qualitative Research, Theory, and Application: A study of qualitative research from different theoretical and methodological approaches. This course is designed to assist the educational leader in becoming a more effective facilitator of learning through knowing how to conduct research without formal hypotheses, allowing the hypotheses to evolve over time as events unfold. The researcher begins without preconceived ideas about what will be observed and describes behavior that seems important. Language principles, designs, and methodologies of producing qualitative research from experimental and non-experimental approaches will be presented. Students will demonstrate skills needed from practical and applied research in various educational settings.
Prerequisite: EDLE 707 And EDLE 708
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EDLE 723  (3-3-0)  Quantitative Research Application and Methodology: This course provides administrators with the knowledge of the methods and analytic approaches in educational research that will aid them in dealing with the school restructuring now occurring in the nation's schools. The measurement, design, and analysis procedures that are the most useful for dealing with a changing school system will be presented. An integrated approach to statistics and educational research will provide the student with an awareness of the interrelations and interdependencies among the statistics and research procedures presented. This awareness is essential for becoming an intelligent consumer of research and a competent researcher. Although the course requires a background in statistics on the level of an introductory course (EDLE 720), these topics will be reviewed before extending the presentation to more advanced topics.
Prerequisite: EDLE 722 And EDLE 730
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EDLE 725  (3-3-0)  Special Topics on School Leadership - Closing the Achievement Gap: Research and Effective Strategies for African American K-12 Students in Public Schools: This course is designed (1) to familiarize graduate students with research about the causes of the underachievement of many African American students in K-12 public schools, and (2) to provide graduate students with effective research-based strategies to improve African American student achievement and retention.
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EDLE 730  (3-3-0)  Internship in Educational Leadership I: The advanced educational leadership internship is an extensive educational experience that will provide an opportunity for candidates to engage in a series of field-based clinical experiences. The candidate, faculty advisor, and the supervisor of the participating organizations will work as a team to develop an individualized plan. These plans will be based on the experiences, background, needs, and professional goals of the candidates.
Prerequisite: EDLE 707 And EDLE 708
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EDLE 731  (3-3-0)  Research Internship Seminar in Educational Leadership: In this course, candidates engage in a series of field-based clinical experiences with a focus on sharing their research, writing, and communication of expertise as related to their dissertation area of focus. Candidates present their preliminary dissertation proposal (chapters 1, 2, and 3). Successfully completing this seminar course prepares candidates to formally enroll in dissertation study under the supervision of a faculty chair and committee.
Prerequisite: EDLE 722 And EDLE 730
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EDLE 740  (3-3-0)  Dissertation in Educational Leadership I & II: The dissertation process serves to bring together all of the experiences in which students have engaged during the entire program. The dissertation culminates the theoretical and practical research experiences of the candidates. The application of theory and research to solve, inform, or suggest changes in problems and dilemmas facing educational leaders today should be reflected in an original, sophisticated, and high quality document. To facilitate the dissertation process, candidates will participate in regularly scheduled seminars designed to keep them on task and provide on-going constructive faculty feedback. The end result is a final dissertation and successful defense. To be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.
Prerequisite: EDLE 723 And EDLE 731
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EDLE 753  (3-3-0)  Advanced Research and Methodology for School Improvement: This course will provide Ed.D. students in the PK-12 cognate area opportunities to investigate a variety of research approaches and statistical procedures to support school or organizational research. Focus is on research methodology, with emphasis on effective problem-solving approaches, research techniques, research design, and applications of statistical methods. Selected concepts covered include estimation, graphic methods, hypothesis testing and variance, correlation, and non-parametric procedures in the context of educational studies. The student will apply appropriate statistical procedures to analyze student achievement, teacher, and parent/community data sets. Computer software programs widely used in educational research will be examined demonstrated.
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EDLE 799  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Educational Leadership and Organizational Change: This course prepares participants to lead change initiatives within a variety of organizational settings. Students will explore change management through a systems approach at it relates to the structural, human resource, political and symbolic frames. Analysis will include contrasting organizational environments, assessing conditions that foster both acceptance and resistance to change, and discussing specific strategies for managing change. Participants are required to select a “live” project and apply the course content to this project. This course is designed to foster the skills necessary for leading teams through a successful transition process.
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EDLE 999  (0-0-0)  Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: This course must be taken every semester in order to maintain active status in the doctoral program until completion of dissertation.
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EDMG 614  (3-3-0)  Techniques of Teaching in the Middle School: A study of the teaching profession, with emphasis on teaching strategies, curriculum content and development, and materials selection for middle school education (grades 6-8).
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EDUC 533  (3-3-0)  Home, School and Community Relations: A course on the planning and marketing of public relations strategies for the betterment of education and school support.
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EDUC 560  (3-3-0)  Educational Communication, Methods and Materials: A survey of types of visual materials used in education, including slides, prints, filmstrips, films, transparencies, and television, with emphasis on the selection, integration, and evaluation of communications materials appropriate to school programs.
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EDUC 600  (3-3-0)  History and Philosophies of Education: A survey of the development of principles and practices of education from earliest times to the 18th century, emphasizing the evolution of educational philosophies.
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EDUC 602  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Education: A study of the origins, development, and contemporary status of education and schools in the United States, with emphasis on issues related to the control of public education and to the organization of school programs and curricula.
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EDUC 610  (3-3-0)  Planning and Implementing Instruction for Diverse Learners: The course addresses the origins, concepts, trends and principles of multicultural education, equity and the conceptual framework on cultural diversity in relation to education. It also exposes the students to a critical conscious approach to dialogue as an effective method applicable to diversity across the curriculum. The topics will include concepts that facilitators of learning will need in order to skillfully, and effectively teach in a multicultural setting. Specific content areas to be covered will be the topology of American cultures and how the following aspects impact on the cultures: Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Sexual orientation, Physical condition and Age. The following concepts will be discussed as part of the conceptual framework on diversity, Ethnocentricity, Eurocentricity, Afrocentricity, Interculturality, Crossculturality, Group dynamics and organizational development. Discussions will focus on explication of the concepts and development of strategies for conflict resolution and situational leadership, thus enabling the facilitator of learning as a change agent to learn to appropriate actions in dealing with the contradictions that shape the education system from economic, social, political and psychological and philosophical aspects.
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EDUC 615  (3-3-0)  Techniques of Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools: A study of the teaching profession, with emphasis on teaching strategies, curriculum content and development and materials selection for middle grades and secondary school education.
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EDUC 616  (3-3-0)  Teaching and Technology in the Middle and Secondary Schools: A study of the teaching profession, with emphasis on teaching strategies, curriculum content and development technology, and materials selected for middle and secondary school education, grades 6-12. Specific attention will be directed forwards developing each student as a facilitator of learning. Emphasis will be placed on integrating technology to enhance teaching and learning.
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EDUC 620  (3-3-0)  Adolescent Psychology: A study of the adolescent in contemporary society, theories of adolescence, and the physical, emotional, social, familial, moral, educational, vocational, and ethnic influences on adolescent behavioral development.
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EDUC 626  (3-3-0)  Applied Strategies for Safe/Peaceful Schools: This course is designed to enhance students' knowledge related to safe schools, violence and conflict resolution. This introductory course will also provide participatory, experiential and hands-on training in conflict resolution, resiliency strategies and peer mediation for pre-service and in service educators. Promoting pro-social behavior and improving learning in K-12 settings for all students are stressed. A supervised field experience is required.
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EDUC 630  (3-3-0)  Advanced Educational Psychology: A study of teaching as a process, emphasizing educational objectives, characteristics of students, theories of learning and motivation, teaching styles and techniques, and evaluation processes.
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EDUC 640  (3-3-0)  Principals and Practices of Supervision: An introduction to educational administration and supervision, including such topics as the multifaceted role of the supervisor, administrative organization, decision making, instructional leadership, curriculum planning, staff development and evaluation, group dynamics, effective school and classroom research, teacher-learner dynamics, motivation, behavior, leadership styles, interpersonal relations, cultural pluralism, and contemporary trends in education.
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EDUC 641  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Human Development and Learning Communities: An exploration of psychological principles and their application to the problem of teaching and learning, including characteristics of stages in human development throughout the preschool and school years, theories of motivation and learning, classroom management strategies, individual differences, exceptional achievement and teaching strategies.
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EDUC 644  (3-3-0)  Foundations and Curriculum Development: A study of educational foundations and curriculum development in secondary schools, including discussions of the development, implementation, and evaluation of educational goals and objectives in the secondary curriculum.
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EDUC 646  (3-3-0)  Trends/Issues in Curriculum and Instruction: An exploration of the current issues, trends, and research in curriculum and instruction, and the sociological, psychological, and political factors influencing educational trends and innovations.
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EDUC 650  (3-3-0)  Effective Practices for Teaching, Learning and Collaborative Leadership: An advanced study of effective teaching practices supported by educational research, the application of technology to the educational setting, learning in content areas, and the design of collaborative leadership. This course is designed to introduce various aspects of teaching and learning that have relevance to understanding effective instructional procedures.
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EDUC 680  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in School Administration: This course examines special topics in the area of school administration and leadership that affect school practices. Selected topics range from varied aspects of school administration and leadership. They include, but are not limited to: 1) School Vision, Mission and Strategic Goals; 2) Teaching for Learning; 3) Understanding Collaborative School Climates; 4) Human and Fiscal Resource Management, 5) Parental and Community Involvement; 6) Leadership development (the principalship), and 7) Politics and Policy.
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EDUC 690  (3-3-0)  Applied Research in Education: A study of the development and use of research, research methods, applied research, basic research, methods of reasoning, fallacies in reasoning, statistical methods, thesis writing, survey-research and evaluation of research Emphasis is placed on understanding the scientific approach and not upon statistics.
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EDUC 694  (3-3-0)  Introduction for Lateral Entries: This course is designed to prepare lateral entry teachers (LE) for teaching in today's general and special education classrooms. Participants will encounter the following issues: understanding the nature of today's learners, teaching today's diverse learners, assessing/diagnosing for classroom teaching, planning lessons, organizing for the instruction, selecting and using developmentally appropriate materials, strategies and technology managing learning environments, selecting service learning opportunities and collaboration with other professionals, parents and agencies.
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EDUC 697  (3-3-0)  Advanced Applied Product of Learning (Internship): This course has been designed to serve as an eleven-week supervised internship for the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Program in Education in a specific content area. This internship in the public secondary and middle schools will provide MAT students with opportunities to observe educational professionals in the classroom, practice teaching under supervision, and to participate in other activities and responsibilities of regular in-service teachers. (Fall and Spring)
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EDUC 698  (3-3-0)  Advanced Applied Product of Learning: This course has been designed to serve as a capstone or culminating experience for the Advanced Master's Degree Program in Education in all the specialization areas. This course will assist students in preparing the culminating activity and will encapsulate the total experiences in the program. It will provide a field-based context for the completion, presentation, and evaluation of the exit options: advanced professional portfolio, action research project, and thesis. (Other requirements related to the area of specialization, such as field experience component, may be required by the area of specialization.)
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EDUC 699  (6-6-0)  Thesis: A supervised empirical study in a selected area of concentration.
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EDUC 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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ELEM 505  (3-3-0)  Modern Math for Elementary Teachers: A study of numeration systems and the real numbers as a basis for teaching mathematics in the elementary school.
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ELEM 530  (3-3-0)  Remediation of Mathematics Difficulties: An exploration of factors that contribute to mathematics difficulties in the elementary and middle school, tests that aid in the diagnosis of difficulties, and techniques for preparing and evaluating individualized educational plans and strategies for remedial instruction.
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ELEM 533  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Arithmetic: A study of the elements of modern mathematics basic to understanding the mathematical system.
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ELEM 534  (3-3-0)  Social Studies in Elementary School: An analysis and evaluation of programs, strategies, and materials for achieving the social studies objectives outlined in the North Carolina course of study.
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ELEM 540  (3-3-0)  Math Education for Gifted Children: An in-depth study of curricula, methods, and materials for teaching mathematics to gifted children.
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ELEM 552  (3-3-0)  Foundation and Curriculum of Early Childhood Education: An in-depth study of the historical, psychological, and sociological foundations of early childhood education and an exploration of current trends and programs in the field.
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ELEM 553  (3-3-0)  Teaching and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education: An exploration of teaching strategies and evaluation processes in early childhood education. (Field experience required.)
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ELEM 560  (3-3-0)  Reading/Language Arts for Gifted Children: An in-depth study of curricula, methods, and materials for teaching reading and the language arts to gifted children, with attention to examining characteristics of the gifted, assessing their unique learning needs, and investigating aspects of creativity.
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ELEM 615  (3-3-0)  Techniques of Teaching in Elementary School: An exploration of effective teaching techniques and innovative forms of organization and instruction in elementary education.
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ELEM 616  (3-3-0)  Problems Seminar in Lower Elementary Grades: An application of research techniques to the study of problems in education at the lower elementary grade level.
Prerequisite: EDUC 680
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ELEM 617  (3-3-0)  Problems Seminar in Upper Elementary Grades: An application of research techniques to the study of problems in education at the upper elementary grade level.
Prerequisite: EDUC 680
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ELEM 623  (3-3-0)  Advanced Language Arts in the Elementary School: An exploration of basic ideas and techniques in the teaching of language arts in the elementary school, with emphasis on approaches for facilitating communication.
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ELEM 624  (3-3-0)  Teaching Writing in the Elementary Schools: A study of the writing process and the teaching of composition.
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ELEM 635  (3-3-0)  Problems in Science Education: A practical course in the basic content of the pure and applied sciences, with attention to acquiring techniques for teaching science in the elementary and middle grades and to developing learning activities and instructional units for classroom use.
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ELEM 640  (3-3-0)  Issues in Elementary Education: This course involves an in depth investigation of current issues and problems that affect elementary education in America. This course also includes a study of trends in curriculum, teaching practices, and evaluation of these topics in terms of effectiveness on teaching and learning. A close examination of the scope and sequence of the elementary school curriculum. (Field experience required.)
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ELEM 652  (3-3-0)  Selected Topics in the Biological Sciences for Elementary Teachers: A study of selected topics in the biological sciences, with applications to the teaching of the biological sciences in the elementary and middle schools.
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ELEM 653  (3-3-0)  Selected Topics in the Physical Sciences: A study of selected topics in the physical sciences, with applications to the teaching of the physical sciences in the elementary and middle schools.
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ELEM 654  (3-3-0)  Selected Topics in the Earth Sciences: A study of selected topics in the earth sciences, with applications to the teaching of earth sciences in the elementary and middle schools.
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ELEM 655  (3-3-0)  Using Technology in Elementary/Middle School Curriculum: This course is designed to further develop abilities in using technology, electronic media and other multi-media in teaching and curriculum planning for elementary and middle level science. This course not only addresses the use and application of very specific types of technology, but also focuses on how technology can be used as a thinking tool to foster meaningful learning in elementary and middle school science classrooms.
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ELEM 680  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Child Literature: An in-depth study of literature for children, with emphasis on the history of children's literature, criteria for the selection of quality books, major authors of children's literature, and current trends and issues in the field.
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ELEM 690  (3-0-3)  Practicum in the Elementary School: A supervised practicum in grades K-6, primarily for students without acceptable prior teaching experience.
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ELEM 691  (3-3-0)  Integrating Technology in the Elementary School Curriculum: This course is designed to further develop abilities in using technology, electronic media and other multi-media in teaching and curriculum planning. This course not only addresses the use and application of very specific types of technology, but also focuses on how technology can be used as a thinking tool to foster meaningful learning.
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ENGL 502  (3-3-0)  Forms of Fiction: A study of the short story and novel as genre. The course will deal with the history and development of both forms in American, British, and Continental literature from the beginning until the modernist movement. Emphasis will be placed upon narrative theory and the rhetoric of fiction.
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ENGL 503  (3-3-0)  Drama: A course in the reading of Western Drama from its Greek beginnings through the Renaissance and Modern Period, emphasizing the conventions and modes of drama as literature, the aesthetics of mimesis, terms, historical background, theme, and structure. The course will include readings from the Greek tragedy and comedy, Shakespeare, mixed forms like tragicomedy, Restoration comedy, and examples of Modern Drama from Ibsen to Beckett.
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ENGL 505  (3-3-0)  The Lyric: The Lyric as Song in English and American poetry is a comprehensive literature course designed to acquaint the student with representative poems in English and American literature from the medieval period in England to the twentieth century in England and America and to familiarize students with the dominant forms, sub-genres, prosodic and metrical structures, rhythm patterns, motifs, and subjective voices employed by representative English and American poets of the inclusive periods. This study will concentrate on the correlations between sound and sense, and on the music of the verse. This course will provide students with an extensive practical, theoretical, and prosodic background. An analysis of the music, themes, and structures of lyric poems will provide a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the musical elements of verse and of lyric poems in particular.
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ENGL 507  (3-3-0)  Bibliography and Methods of Research: This course will introduce students to the graduate study of English language and literature. Study will center on both the integrity of individual texts and the historic, economic, social, and political factors that may have influenced literature and language. The development of printing and publishing, conventional style manuals, and central works of the twentieth century will be considered in order to provide an understanding of editorial standards and textual research.
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ENGL 508  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Linguistics: This course provides students with the terminology and elementary concepts of linguistics. Students will separate linguistic science from myths. The course identifies linguistic markers in both literary and everyday language. The raw material of language will be studied as resources for art, i.e. poetry. The course will delineate some of the issues in contemporary linguistics. Although not primarily a course on pedagogy, this course will from time to time apply linguistic principles to the teaching of English language and literature.
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ENGL 509  (3-3-0)  Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics: Sociolinguistics is the study of language in society, including dialectology, gender issues, politeness, language policy, and pedagogy. Pragmatics is the study of communication in context, including deixis, implicature, speech acts, metaphor, and other tropes.
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ENGL 511  (3-3-0)  Tragic Vision: A course in the readings of the tragic in drama, fiction, and poetry. The course will examine versions of the tragic experience, pathos in contrast to tragedy, the hero, and the possibilities of transcendence in tragedy. The course will study the tragic vision in Greek tragedy, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Yeats, and Beckett. It will look for the tragic in, for example, the fiction of Conrad and Mann, and in, for example, the poetry of Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Dickinson, Yeats, and Plath.
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ENGL 515  (3-3-0)  History of Criticism and Literary Theory: This course will provide students with a familiarity with the traditional texts of Western literary theory and criticism. The second half of the course will concentrate on contemporary trends in literary criticism (beginning approximately with Oscar Wilde), which are often reactions against more traditional notions. Often the course will introduce concepts that are, or seem to be, counterintuitive.
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ENGL 516  (3-3-0)  Issues in Composition Instruction: This course will be concerned with current theories in writing and revising compositions. Particular attention will be paid to composition as a process, ultimately leading to a product. The course will also examine writers including basic/inexperienced writers and their problems. Students in this course will seek and discover information and techniques that will aid them in functioning as facilitators of writing.
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ENGL 517  (3-3-0)  Issues in Teaching Literature: The course will provide a basic introduction to the teaching of literature in its four main forms: fiction, poetry, drama, and film. The concept of documentary narrative in relation to these four will be examined as well. Genre and subgenre will also be considered as means of grouping texts. Particular attention will be paid to the relative appropriateness of teaching the different forms of literature at different age and ability levels. Questions of canon will be considered in order to relate gender, race, and ethnicity to the secondary curriculum. Finally, the relation of literary criticism and critical theory to the teaching of the four forms will be considered.
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ENGL 518  (3-3-1)  Technology and the Language Arts Curriculum: The course will provide students with the ability to use computers and multimedia to enhance the language arts classroom. Word processing and composition; the use of style checkers and editing programs, computer-assisted and computer-managed instruction, multimedia, and social media will be examined in the light of recent research into their effectiveness as pedagogical tools. Students will design and implement a syllabus for a computer intensive language arts course.
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ENGL 531  (3-3-0)  Literature of the South: This course examines literature emanating from the American South, covering the colonial and antebellum period through the Civil War and its aftermath into the early Twentieth Century and the Southern Renascence, culminating with a view of the contemporary Southern literary landscape. The course will use literary works and other material to examine how the South differs from other regions of the nation as it attempts to define "Southern literature." In addition, the course will examine Southern literature to discover its beliefs, values, and ideals and to explore the literary tradition of the modern South.
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ENGL 533  (3-3-0)  Approach to Reading African-American Literature: This course will explore formal modes, figurations, and traditions in African-American writings. The course will analyze ways in which African-American cultural codes produce and reproduce value and meaning. Primary focus includes vernacular theories, performance theories, "womanist" perspectives, and new historicism. The course will include culturally specific aspects of African- American writings and culture, showing how the black tradition has inscribed its own theories of rhetorical systems. The course will consider the slave narrative tradition as it is reflected in different periods by such writers as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Richard Wright, and Toni Morrison. A New Historicist approach to reading will give attention to how historical discourse displays the surrounding ideology. A consideration of the "black aesthetic" will emphasize the performance of African-American writings.
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ENGL 534  (3-3-0)  Women and Literature: This course surveys many of the most important literary texts written by women. The course explores and analyzes the cultural assumptions embedded in literature about women written by men and women. The course examines the social, political, ideological, and economic matrices of both the production and readership of literature. It gives special attention to women's revaluations and revisions of those matrices. The course discusses the varieties of contemporary feminist theory and criticism. The course also applies feminist contributions to the more important contemporary developments in literary theory and criticism: reader-response theory, structuralism and deconstruction, the new historicism, and the debate over canon formation.
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ENGL 540  (3-3-0)  English Phonology and Morphology: An introduction to the phonology (sound system) and morphology (word formation) of English. Primary emphasis will be on Standard English, but others varies of English will be considered. Pedagogical approaches on phonology and morphology will be a component of the course.
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ENGL 542  (3-3-0)  Advanced Creative Writing: An intensive seminary devoted to the creation and revision of original creative writing. Genre focus will vary each semester and will alternate between poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and children’s literature.
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ENGL 544  (3-3-0)  Advanced Business Writing: This course explores the principles of effective writing in business and administration with special focus on developing correspondence, reports, proposals, presentations, flyers and other business documents, as well as researching issues related to business communication, including ethical, legal, and cross-cultural contemporary concerns.
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ENGL 545  (3-3-0)  Advanced Technical Writing: This course explores effective writing in technical genres, with a focus on adjusting content, organization and style for various audiences including peer, managerial, and lay audiences. Students will examine and produce various technical documents, such as instructions or manuals and reports, and engage in usability testing and revisions of documents.
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ENGL 623  (3-3-0)  Medieval English Literature: The course will survey literature written in Middle English. Most texts will be read in Middle English. It will not include Chaucer, although it does assume a prior acquaintance with Chaucer. The course will trace the Continental and Old English antecedents of Middle English literature. It will consider the social, political, and economic matrices of Middle English literature. It will observe the interpenetration of religious and secular Middle English, literary texts using the new critical and theoretical approaches, especially feminism, neo-historicism, and reader-response theory.
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ENGL 630  (3-3-0)  Modern Novel: A study of the major novels and novelists of the Modernist movement from the late 19th century to the present. The texts will be analyzed through close reading, attempting to make aesthetic connections among the works, and to examine the social and political context in which the works were produced. An attempt will be made to derive a definition of what Modernism was and is and how it shaped the consciousness of contemporary man. The novels will be discussed as reactions to the thematic concerns and resolutions of more traditional early fictions; the complexity of modernist works will be seen as a natural reaction to the complex vision of man, which late 19th and early 20th century writers inherited. Among the writers to be studied are the following: Dostoyevsky, Kafka, Flaubert, Lawrence, Forster, and Dos Passos.
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ENGL 632  (3-3-0)  Special Topics: A study of major tradition, period, author, or current issues in literature. This course will vary according to the expertise of the individual instructor and may be repeated for credit under different subtitles (e.g., Literature and Protest, and the Canon and Its Revision).
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ENGL 636  (3-3-0)  Seminar in American Literature: The seminar in American literature will examine the works and influence of an individual author, the literary output of a number of different authors, or a particular literary period, such as the Harlem Renaissance, or a literary movement, such as the American Romanticism. Though the specific content of the course may vary, the seminar will be an intensive examination and interpretation of selected texts, as opposed to a survey of many. The course is designed to limit the scope of the material covered so that students can closely examine from various literary perspectives a few key texts. The format emphasizes class members leading the discussion, doing independent research, and exchanging the results of their research. This course will vary according to the expertise of the individual instructor and may be repeated for credit under different subtitles.
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ENGL 637  (3-3-0)  Seminar in British Literature: The seminar in British literature will focus on an individual writer, a small corpus of works by several different writers, or a theme developed by a series of British writers (e.g., social revolt in modern literature, the social status of the hero in epic, medieval, and modern narrative poetry, the sea in British literature, the private self through the "stream of consciousness," Medieval literature, English, Renaissance, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, post-modern literature, Spenser, Shaw, Joyce, or Woolf.) The seminar will be an intense and close reading and interpretation of selected texts, rather than a survey of many. The purpose of a seminar is to limit the scope of the material covered in order for students to scrutinize from many different literary perspectives a few key texts in British literature. The format is mainly directed discussion with class members leading the discussion, doing independent research, and exchanging results of their research. This course will vary according to the expertise of the individual instructor and may be repeated for credit under different subtitles.
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ENGL 638  (3-3-0)  Thesis I: An original investigation in a subject approved by the student's thesis committee. Detailed information on the preparation, form, and defense of the thesis is presented in the Guide for the Preparation and Submission of Theses.
Prerequisite: ENGL 507 And ENGL 515
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ENGL 639  (3-3-0)  Thesis II: Continued preparation of the thesis under the direction of the advisor and the thesis committee.
Prerequisite: ENGL 507 And ENGL 515
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ENGL 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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FINC 560  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Finance: This course surveys the fundamental financial concepts and principles including the role of the financial manager, valuation models, basic risk and return concepts, and capital budgeting, capital structure theory, dividend policy, working capital management, and financial planning and control.
Prerequisite: ACCT 550 Or equivalent
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FINC 620  (3-3-0)  Financial Management: This course focuses on the firm's financing and investment decisions. Among the topics covered is capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, and risk management. Emphasis is placed on the importance of valuation in financial decision making and on the effects of international capital markets on the firm's value creation opportunities.
Prerequisite: FINC 560 Or equivalent
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FINC 655  (3-3-0)  International Finance: This course is designed to recognize the increasing importance of global integration of money and capital markets, a trend that is creating expanded opportunities for both investors and organizations that need to raise capital. This course will focus on macroeconomic issues such as the significance of balance of payments deficits, microeconomic issues such as capital budgeting for multinational corporations, detailed discussion of international markets, and analysis of risk and effect of diversification on an international basis.
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FINC 660  (3-3-0)  Financial Institutions: Recent developments in financial institutions and markets will be studied. The impact of new financial regulation on financial intermediaries and how it will affect operations will be investigated.
Prerequisite: FINC 610
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FINC 670  (3-3-0)  Investment Analysis: The objective of this course is to help students gain an appreciation of what is involved in making investment decisions. The strategies of practicing investment professionals as well as results from theoretical and empirical research are used to introduce students to the practical aspects of investing.
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FINC 680  (3-3-0)  Option and Futures Trading: This course provides the student an introduction to derivative securities markets. Option and future instruments are discussed in detail, followed by valuation theory and hedging application.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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FINC 695  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Finance: Current issues and practices in finance will be selected as problems for intensive exploration and reporting.
Prerequisite: FINC 610
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HCM 680  (3-3-0)  Managed Care and the American Healthcare Systems: This course provides a foundation to understand and apply the concepts of managed care. The evolution and need for managed care will be explored as well as the managerial tools needed to accomplish managed care goals. Particular emphasis will be placed on the provider and consumer issues inherent to managed care systems in the current environment, as well as the application of managed care concepts to specific industry segments.
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HCM 681  (3-3-0)  Health Care Finance and Control: This course focuses on the financial assessment, acquisition, allocation, and control of financial aspects of health care organizations. Topics include application of financial management principles of the unique decision-making in the healthcare industry, budgeting processes, cost allocation, fee structures, and management control process.
Prerequisite: FINC 610
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HCM 682  (3-3-0)  Health Services Marketing: This course is designed as an advanced study in the application of marketing tools within varied healthcare settings. Additionally, core marketing concepts and contemporary issues in healthcare marketing will be explored with emphasis on using marketing tools to meet organizational and public health goals.
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HCM 683  (3-3-0)  Ethical and Legal Issues in Health Care: This course provides guidance in preventing and solving managerial and biomedical ethical problems including substantive ethical principles and procedural methodologies by which managers can understand, analyze and resolve ethical problems. Topics covered include business ethics versus health care ethics, conflicts of interest, ethical committees, informed consent, confidentiality, human experimentation, death and dying, abortion, the ethics of managed care, and HIV disease. In the second part of the course, federal and state laws, health care agencies and regulations are evaluated. Recent court decisions and their implications with respect to the health care profession will be discussed. Class discussions will consist of the realistic aspects of using legal counsel and diminishing tort and criminal liability to the health care institution.
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HCM 684  (3-3-0)  Human Resources for Health Care: This course is designed to explore key concepts, theories, and issues in the effective utilization of human resources within health service organizations. The strategic value of human resource management will be emphasized as will the contemporary human resource environment, acquisition and preparation of human resources, assessment and development, compensation and additional special topic areas.
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HIST 501  (3-3-0)  Historiography: An exploration of theories of historical interpretation, with applications to the histories of the United States, Latin America, and Europe.
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HIST 506  (3-3-0)  Revolution and American Identity: This course is an introduction to the major writings and interpretations of the era of the Revolution from the early eighteenth century to the ratification of the Constitution in 1787. The emphasis will be on eighteenth-century American Society and culture, the connections between England and the evolution of American protest and political thought that shaped American ideological concepts that were the basis of the independence movement and the effects of the revolution on class status, slavery and race, as well as the attempts to create new forms of government in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War.
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HIST 507  (3-3-0)  Soc Strata in the Ante South: An exploration of social delineations in the Old South, with attention to the rationale for and the distinguishing features of these groupings.
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HIST 508  (3-3-0)  Antebellum Reform Movements: A developmental study of the origins and progress of American reform efforts from their inception in the Great Revivalism of the 1820s to the culmination of the controversial reform movement, Abolitionism, in the 1860s, with particular attention to the polemical and cognitive aspects of antebellum reformism.
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HIST 510  (3-3-0)  Stud in 20th Cent US History: An exploration of social, cultural, political, economic, and military issues in U.S. history from the beginning of World War I to the present, including such topics as the development of a mass society, changing role of women, and other relevant issues.
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HIST 512  (3-3-0)  Interpretation of 19th Century US History: The course focus is on the literature and interpretations of major issues in nineteenth century United States history. The required readings will place the issues and periods in a cogent context with the latest interpretations. The student will also be introduced though the required reading to the historiographical controversies in major fields of political and social history with special emphasis on the Civil War and Reconstruction.
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HIST 519  (3-3-0)  History of Medicine and Public Health in US: An examination of the major health problems confronting Americans from colonial times through the twentieth century, as well as the policies and measures adopted by state and federal authorities to deal with these problems.
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HIST 520  (3-3-0)  Studies in United States Foreign Relations from 1771 to the Present: A study of domestic factors that contributed to the shaping of U.S. foreign policy from the revolutionary period through post-war conflicts with England and France, including such aspects as expansionism, the Spanish-American War, relations with Latin America, World War I and Wilsonian ideals, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, NATO and the Cold War, and the current issues of nuclear proliferation and U.S. and Soviet relations in the post-Vietnam era.
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HIST 526  (3-3-0)  The French Revolution: A study of the development of the ideas of the Enlightenment, particularly in France, and their contribution to the revolutionary ferment, and the sequence of events by which the Revolution emerged, the changing attitudes within French society, and the economic, social, and political changes brought by the Revolution to France and all of Europe.
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HIST 527  (3-3-0)  Europe in the Industrial Age: A course focusing on the social, economic, and technological factors which led to the spread of industrialization in Europe in the nineteenth century, and on the social, political, demographic, and intellectual reactions to the industrial revolution from its early days through World War I.
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HIST 528  (3-3-0)  The Rise of Fascism in Europe: An investigation of the political, social, intellectual, and economic factors making possible the rise of fascism in Europe in the period between the world wars, with attention to the influence and operations of major fascist parties through the beginning of World War II.
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HIST 537  (3-3-0)  History of Imperial Russia: This course will explore, in depth, the social, cultural, and political history of Russia during the imperial period (roughly 1700-1917). The class will include analyses of the important social, economic, and political strata and organizations as they occurred in imperial Russia.
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HIST 538  (3-3-0)  History in 20th Century Russia: This course will introduce, in some depth, the forces of stability and change interacting during the years 1900-1995 in Russia. It will focus on the Bolshevik experiment, the rise of Stalinist dictatorship, World Wars, the Cold War, and the demise of the Soviet system.
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HIST 551  (3-3-0)  Caribbean History from Columbus to 1838: A survey of Caribbean history to 1838, with emphasis on the impact of European conquests and the Catholic influence, plantation slavery, African socio-economic development, nation-state rivalries in the Caribbean, local governments, and the impact of the abolitionist movement.
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HIST 552  (3-3-0)  Caribbean History Post-Slave: A continuation of the history of the Caribbean, with study of such topics as black peasantry, the influence of missionaries, value formation, Asian contract workers, labor unions, the plantation economy, the independence movement, and relations with the metropolitan countries and the United States.
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HIST 555  (3-3-0)  The ABC Countries: A study of the cultural, economic, and political development of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile.
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HIST 556  (3-3-0)  The Andean Republics: A study of the social, economic, and political development of the continent of South America north of the Southern Cone.
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HIST 557  (3-3-0)  The Harlem Renaissance: A comprehensive study of the Harlem Renaissance/the Age of the "New Negro," primarily from 1920 to 1930. The course will examine African-American culture and politics from the perspective of the African-Americans who participated in this cultural and political explosion through the prism of post-1920 historians.
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HIST 558  (3-3-0)  African-Americans and World War II: A comprehensive study of African-Americans, the mind-set of the U.S. military, and World War II. The course will focus on the nature and the problems surrounding the integration and usage of African-Americans in the armed forces of the United States, primarily from 1937 to 1950.
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HIST 560  (3-3-0)  Black Biography: An in-depth study of major African American personalities who have directly and indirectly impacted the black and white communities in the course of United States history. This course will present African Americans as the major players in studying and interpreting the major historical questions and problems, which have directly and indirectly impacted the course of United States history.
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HIST 570  (3-3-0)  Major Topics in African History: This course examines the significant developments on the African continent from pre-history to the modern era. The focus is on isolating those people, places, and events that have shaped the “African character.” Topics include Africa as the biological and cultural place of origins for humankind, the great kingdoms of African antiquity, the impact on African societies of the various slave trades on the continent, the impact on African societies of European colonialism, and the recovery of African societies via independence movements.
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HIST 572  (3-3-0)  African Liberation Movements: This course is designed to familiarize students with the efforts to achieve independence by various African peoples. Regionally, the course will span liberation movements from Egypt to South Africa. Chronologically, it will include efforts of Africans to free themselves from the shackles of European Colonialism in the twentieth century. The focus of the course will be to provide tangible evidence that freedom or democratic movements are not just confined to the Western World but reflect the universal yearnings of all people.
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HIST 575  (3-3-0)  History of Women in Africa: The study of women's roles and contributions in history has become a major discipline. This course is designed to look at one segment of women in history - women in sub- Saharan Africa. Using scholars who articulate the insights of the most recent scholarship, the course intends to present an overview of women's past and present contributions to African development as well as the many obstacles to their further economic and social progress. The course will explore women's history in the region as it has changed over time under pre-colonial, colonial, and independence governments. It will address the wide range of variations in women's social position in Africa as well as the effect of cultural influences imposed by outsiders. Divided into three parts, it will address many current women's issues under the following topics: Women in the Economy, Women in Society and Culture, and Women in Politics and Policy Making. Specifically addressed are the current issues of women as heads of households, female circumcision (female genital mutilation), multiple wives, child care, control over women's labor and the proceeds from that labor, the feminist movement, women in the military, women's role in politics and the effect of local and international governmental policy on women.
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HIST 576  (3-3-0)  Africa and the Americas: This course has a double purpose: to introduce students to African history and to explore the continuing relationship tying Americans of African descent to the continent of Africa. The first part of the course will focus on the history of West Africa before the beginning of the sea-borne exchange with Europe and the Americas. Students will be introduced to the early West African empires, to local patterns of society and culture, and to the role-played by Muslim scholars, clerics, traders, and kings. In the second part of the course we examine the history of Africans and the changes they undergo on the continent of Africa and in the Diaspora. This includes the European colonization of Africa and the Africans who were drawn into the Atlantic exchange: the history of the New World plantation complex and the role of African culture and social organization in shaping life in the Americas. In the last part of the course, we explore the connections between Africans and the African-Americans: Back to Africa movements in the US (1820's and 1920's), the African foundations of early modern African-American thought, and the contributions made by African Americans to the African continent.
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HIST 590  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in History: This course provides for study of special topics in history not covered in the regular graduate history courses.
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HIST 591  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in History: This course provides for study of special topics in history not covered in the regular graduate history courses.
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HIST 601  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings in 19th Central American History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 602  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings in 20th Central American History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 603  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings in African-American History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examination.
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HIST 626  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings: 18th Central European History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 627  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings: 19th Central European History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 628  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings: 20th Central European History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 650  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings in Mexican History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 651  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings in Caribbean History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 652  (3-3-0)  Directed Readings in Latin American History: A directed reading course for those history students who are making their final preparations for the comprehensive examinations.
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HIST 691  (3-3-0)  Master's Thesis: The writing of a thesis based on original scholarly research about a topic related to the major field and approved by the thesis advisor, and the completion of an oral defense of the thesis before an examining committee. (May be completed in increments of three credit hours per semester.)
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HIST 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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MATH 501  (3-3-0)  Teaching Mathematics Using Computers: A study of the use of computers in mathematics teaching and research, incorporating evaluations of instructional software and examining integrative techniques for applications of microcomputers in middle grades math, consumer math, general math, geometry, advanced mathematics, trigonometry, and calculus.
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MATH 502  (3-3-0)  Topics in Mathematics for Teachers: An intensive study of current topics in mathematics of interest to public school teachers including but not limited to such topics as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, functions, statistics, probability, and use of technology.
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MATH 504  (3-3-0)  Current Trends in Mathematics Education: The primary purpose of this course is to explore mathematics education from methodological and research perspectives. This will be accomplished by developing teaching, research, writing, presentation, and discussion skills.
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MATH 505  (3-3-0)  Analysis for Teachers I: An exploration of proofs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, and definite integrals.
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MATH 506  (3-3-0)  Analysis for Teachers II: A continuation of MATH 505, emphasizing proofs and covering such topics as the integral, applications of the integral, L'Hospital's Rule, infinite series, and multiple integrals.
Prerequisite: MATH 502
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MATH 507  (3-3-0)  Linear Algebra I: The first course in a two-semester sequence in linear algebra, including such topics as systems of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, canonical forms of matrices, and inner product spaces.
Prerequisite: MATH 251 or consent of the department.
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MATH 508  (3-3-0)  Numerical Analysis: A practical survey of numerical analysis, with topics included from iterative methods of nonlinear equations, the approximation theory, numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations, and numerical linear algebra.
Prerequisite: MATH 251 And MATH 331 And MATH 507
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MATH 509  (3-3-0)  Linear Programming and Applications: An applications-oriented course developing some of the theories and computational techniques of linear programming - the simplex method, the concept of duality, and the Duality Theorem, matrix representation of the Simplex Algorithm, sensitivity analysis, integer programming - and applying them to transportation problems.
Prerequisite: MATH 372
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MATH 511  (3-3-0)  Abstract Algebra I: The first course of a two-semester sequence in abstract algebra, including such topics as groups, normal subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, Cayley's Theorem, Cauchy's Theorem, permutation groups, Sylow's Theorem, direct products, finite abelian groups, rings, ring homomorphisms, ideals, quotient rings, Euclidean rings, and polynomial rings.
Prerequisite: MATH 361 or consent of department
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MATH 521  (3-3-0)  Real Analysis I: The first course of a three-semester sequence in real analysis, including such topics as real number systems, elements of point-set topology and metric spaces, sequences and series of real numbers, continuity, differentiation, integration, the Reimann-Stieltjes Integral, sequences, and series of functions, point wise and uniform convergence, functions of several variables, implicit function, and inverse function theorems.
Prerequisite: MATH 412 or consent of department
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MATH 531  (3-3-0)  Topology I: The first course in a three-semester sequence in topology, presenting an axiomatic development of topological spaces and including such topics as continuity, compactness, connectedness, separation axioms, metric spaces, and convergence.
Prerequisite: MATH 412 or consent of department
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MATH 533  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Teaching Mathematics: An in-depth investigation of a variety of techniques and topics pertaining to curriculum, methodology, technology and research in teaching mathematics in grades 6-9, including an exploration of problem analysis, descriptive statistics and elementary probability. Statistical software such as Excel and SPSS will be used to reinforce concepts.
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MATH 541  (3-3-0)  Complex Analysis I: The first course of a three-semester sequence in complex variables, including such topics as complex numbers and their geometrical representation, point sets, sequences and mappings in the complex plane, single-valued analytic functions of a complex variable, elementary functions, and integration.
Prerequisite: MATH 412 or consent of department
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MATH 571  (3-3-0)  Ordinary Differential Equation: A course including such topics as existence and uniqueness theorems, linear systems, autonomous systems, periodicity, boundedness and stability of solutions, nonlinear equations, perturbation theory, Sturm-Liouville systems, etc.
Prerequisite: MATH 331 or consent of department
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MATH 581  (3-3-0)  Operational Mathematics: A study of the theories of Laplace and Fourier transforms and their applications both to ordinary and partial differential equations (including integral equations) and to problems in engineering and the physical sciences.
Prerequisite: MATH 331
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MATH 607  (3-3-0)  Vector Space Methods in System Optimization: An introduction to algebraic and functional analysis concepts used in systems modeling and optimization: vector spaces, linear mappings, spectral decompositions, adjoins, orthogonal projections, duality, fixed points and differentials, with additional emphasis on least squares estimations, minimum norm problems in Banach spaces, linearization in Hilbert space, iterative solutions of systems of equations, and optimization problems.
Prerequisite: MATH 241 And MATH 521
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MATH 611  (3-3-0)  Linear Algebra II: The second course of a two-semester sequence, including such topics as vector spaces, linear independence and bases, dual spaces, inner product spaces, modules, extension fields, roots of polynomials, elements of Galois theory, solvability by radicals, Galois groups over the rationals, algebra of linear transformations, matrices, canonical forms; triangular form, Nilpotent transformation, Jordan form, rational canonical form, Hermitian, unitary, and Normal transformations real quadratic forms.
Prerequisite: MATH 507
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MATH 612  (3-3-0)  Abstract Algebra II: A presentation of advanced topics in abstract algebra, including categories and functions, direct sums and free abelian groups, finitely generated abelian groups, commutative rings, localization, principal rings, direct products and sums of modules, homology sequence, Euler characteristic, Jordan-Holder Theorem, free algebras, tensor products, Noetherian rings and modules, extensions of rings, extension of homomorphisms, transcendental extension of homorphisms, Hilbert's Nullstellensatz, algebraic sets, representations of finite groups, and semi-simplicity of group algebra.
Prerequisite: MATH 511
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MATH 621  (3-3-0)  Real Analysis II: A study of such topics as the Lebesgue measure, the Lebesgue integral, differentiation and integration theory, the classical Banach spaces, metric spaces, elements of topological spaces, compact spaces, abstract measure and integration theory, the Danielle integral, mappings of measure spaces, and elements of functional analysis.
Prerequisite: MATH 521
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MATH 622  (3-3-0)  Real Analysis III: A continuation of MATH 621, including such topics as extension of a linear function, construction of measure, the space of Lp (X), (1 p 4), integration on a product space, complex measures, the Haar integral, bounded functions, and almost periodic functions.
Prerequisite: MATH 621
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MATH 631  (3-3-0)  Topology II: A continuation of MATH 531, including the following additional topics: embedding and metrication, function and quotient spaces, and complete metric spaces.
Prerequisite: MATH 531
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MATH 632  (3-3-0)  Topology III: A study of advanced topics such as homotopy and the fundamental group, homology theory, exactness, the excision theorem, Mayer-Vietoris sequences, the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, cohomology and duality, and higher homotopy groups.
Prerequisite: MATH 631
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MATH 641  (3-3-0)  Complex Analysis II: The second course of a two-semester sequence in complex analysis, including metric spaces and the topology in C, elementary properties and examples of analytic functions, complex integration, singularities, the maximum modulus theorem, compactness and convergence in the space of analytic functions.
Prerequisite: MATH 541
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MATH 642  (3-3-0)  Complex Analysis III: A continuation of MATH 641, including such advanced topics as Runge’s Theorem, analytic continuity and Reimann surfaces, harmonic functions, entire functions, and the range of an analytic function.
Prerequisite: MATH 641
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MATH 651  (3-3-0)  Functional Analysis I: The first course of a two-semester sequence, including such topics as normed spaces, Banach spaces, the dual space, continuous linear mappings (spaces), topological vector spaces, the open mapping and closed graph theorems, equicontinuous mappings, and theorems of Banach and Banach-Steinhaus, convex sets, separation of convex sets, and the Hahn-Banach Theorem.
Prerequisite: MATH 621
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MATH 652  (3-3-0)  Functional Analysis II: The second course of a two-semester sequence, including such topics as locally convex spaces, metrizable locally convex spaces, the determination of various dual spaces and their topologies, compact convex sets, weakly compact sets, semireflexivity, reflexivity, extreme points, Krien Milman Theorem, Eberlein-Smulian Theorem, and metric properties of normed spaces.
Prerequisite: MATH 651
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MATH 671  (3-3-0)  Partial Differential Equations: A study of topics such as Cauchy-Kowalewski theorem, existence and regularity of the solutions, Dirichlet problem for linear elliptic equations, Cauchy problems, hyperbolic equations, and fundamental solutions of linear equations with constant coefficients.
Prerequisite: MATH 331 And MATH 571
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MATH 681  (3-3-0)  Tensor Analysis: A study of such topics as tensor algebra, covariant and contravariant components, christoffel symbols, and applications of tensor analysis.
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MATH 699  (6-6-0)  Thesis Research: An extensive research experience in an approved topic of choice.
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MATH 710  (3-3-0)  Topics in Abstract Algebra: Discussions of special and advanced topics, forming an axiomatic and rigorous study of algebra within the scope of research interests of the instructor.
Prerequisite: MATH 612
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MATH 720  (3-3-0)  Topics in Real Analysis: Discussions of special and advanced topics, forming an axiomatic and rigorous study of real analysis within the scope of research interests of the instructor.
Prerequisite: MATH 632
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MATH 730  (3-3-0)  Topics in Topology: Discussions of special and advanced topics, forming an axiomatic and rigorous study of topology within the scope of research interests of the instructor.
Prerequisite: MATH 632
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MATH 740  (3-3-0)  Topics in Complex Analysis: Discussions of special and advanced topics, forming an axiomatic and rigorous study of complex analysis within the scope of research interests of the instructor.
Prerequisite: MATH 642
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MATH 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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MGMT 605  (3-3-0)  The Art of Leadership and Communication: This course is the first step in the development of the path that students will take as they move through the MBA program. The course focuses on three core activities. First, they will work on the development of goals they hope to achieve in their MBA education. Next, students will discuss and receive individualized guidance from a 360 Degree feedback assessment designed to help them improve and enhance critical career and professional skills. Finally, students participate in experiential exercises that focus on the communication skills and behaviors required for successful leadership. Students' written and oral skills are enhanced through report preparation, presentation, and public speaking.
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MGMT 610  (3-3-0)  Management Science: This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual understanding of the role that management science plays in the decision-making process. Various quantitative methods will be discussed, including linear programming, decision analysis, project management, inventory models, forecasting, simulation, and queuing models. There will be an emphasis on modeling, problem solving, and showing how quantitative approaches can be used to enhance the decision making process.
Prerequisite: BADM 530 Or equivalent
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MGMT 615  (3-3-0)  Organizational Behavior: This course explores importance of human behavior in reaching organizational goals. Course emphasis: managing individual and interpersonal relations; group and inter-group dynamics; leadership, communication and motivation skills in managing organizational performance and change.
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MGMT 645  (3-3-0)  Electronic Commerce: The purpose of this course is to provide the essentials of electronic commerce-how it is being conducted and managed as well as assessing its major opportunities, limitations, issues, and risks. Major topics include Internet consumer retailing, business-to-business e-commerce, m-commerce, e-commerce support services, and e-commerce strategy and implementation. Students will also learn how to launch a successful online business.
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MGMT 650  (3-3-0)  Business Policy and Strategy: This is a capstone course designed to develop a framework of analysis for long-term policy formulation in a global economy. Case materials and computer simulation are used to integrate strategic concepts and techniques learned in earlier core courses. Emphasis will be placed on social and ethical responsibilities of management.
Prerequisite: ACCT 610 And MGMT 615 And MKTG 640 And FINC 620
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MGMT 655  (3-3-0)  Management of Technology: This course represents a case based approach focusing on the integration of technology and strategy and social and ethical issues of technology management. Emphasis is placed on designing technology strategies and managing innovative systems for developing new products and businesses.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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MGMT 660  (3-3-0)  International Business Management: This course examines management concepts and the practices of multinational and foreign firms. The objectives, strategies, policies, and organizational structures of corporations engaged in various social, economic, political, and cultural environments are discussed also.
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MGMT 665  (3-3-0)  Total Quality Management: Success in modern business depends on success in quality management. This course will provide the framework and methods for potential business managers and entrepreneurs to approach quality as a strategic and competitive variable. Methods to be covered include statistical process control, tolerance and robust design. Course content draws heavily on the teachings of Drs. W. Edwards Deming, Genichi, and Taguchi.
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MGMT 670  (3-3-0)  Supply Chain Management: Interest in supply chain management, both in industry and in academia, has grown rapidly over the past several years. This course represents, in an easily accessible manner, recently developed state-of-the-art models and solution methods important in the design, control and operation of supply chains.
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MGMT 675  (3-3-0)  New Ventures and Entrepreneurship: This course focuses on the generation and analysis of ideas and the managerial decisions necessary to operate a new venture. It emphasizes creativity and the source of ideas, an idea's operational feasibility, analysis of the environment, industry, and financial resources needed by the entrepreneur for improving the chances of success, as well as operational issues such as marketing, risk protection, and human resource management. Self-assessment and other managerial decision making tools aid in determining the entrepreneurial interest of course participants.
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MGMT 685  (3-3-0)  Leadership in Organizations: This course provides analysis and development of leadership theory and thought and identifies and evaluates leaders in formal and informal organizations. Case materials and business games are used to develop and enhance leadership quality.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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MGMT 695  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Management: Current issues and practices in the management of organizations. Individual or group research leading to class discussions and debates.
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MIS 620  (3-3-0)  Management Information Systems: Information systems have become essential for creating competitive firms, managing global corporations, and providing useful products and services to customers. This course provides the concepts of management information systems that students will find vital to their professional success. It is a computer-based approach to planning, design, implementation and evaluation of information systems in complex organizations. International issues related to the transnational firms, and social, ethical and cultural issues related to information systems are covered also.
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MKTG 570  (3-3-0)  Fundamentals of Marketing: This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of marketing and focuses upon the factors that influence managerial strategies and decisions for marketing their product or services, which include consumer and organization buyer behavior, marketing research, product decision, services marketing, promotion, pricing and distribution. Additionally, the course examines marketing in the international, electronic, and non-profit sectors and seeks to sensitize students to the legal and ethical consequences of marketing decisions.
Prerequisite: ECON 540 Or equivalent
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MKTG 640  (3-3-0)  Marketing Management: A study of the organization and coordination of the total marketing program: sales, advertising, product development, pricing decision making, marketing research, materials management, market segmentation and product differentiation, planning and policy determination.
Prerequisite: MKTG 570 Or equivalent
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MKTG 650  (3-3-0)  International Marketing: This course explores methods applied to estimate market potential and to serve markets outside the United States; methods to serve these markets through branches, warehousing operations, international brokers and traders and foreign affiliates, adaptations to markets in countries with different cultural, political and economic characteristics, and reviews of the marketing and distribution methods of a selected number of U.S. and foreign companies.
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MKTG 660  (3-3-0)  Marketing Analysis and Research: This course represents an intensive study of market structure and demand for consumer and industrial goods, buyer and consumer behavior, and analysis of distribution systems with analytical techniques.
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MKTG 675  (3-3-0)  Services Marketing: This course focuses on the distinctive aspects of marketing a service. The issues and concepts of services marketing are explored through the utilization of cases.
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MKTG 680  (3-3-0)  Marketing Channels: This course focuses on the process of logistics planning and implementation through case analyses and tests. Domestic and international issues such as transportation modes, warehousing, materials procurement and flow, and customer service will be the primary emphasis of the course.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
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MKTG 695  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Marketing: This course examines current topics and problems in marketing. Intensive individual or group research is applied to the marketing issues facing management.
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POLI 510  (3-3-0)  American Constitutional Law: This course will provide students with the ability to examine and analyze the role of the United States Supreme Court in the development of the American constitutional system. Particular attention will be paid to the development of the relative legal status of the branches of the federal government to deal with major domestic and foreign issues as well as the legal relationship between the national government and the states, and the development of legal guidelines and principles as precedents for future courts.
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POLI 530  (3-3-0)  Black Politics in the US: This course is an examination of the ideology, interest group organizations and electoral arrangements affecting black involvement in the political system. Both traditional and nontraditional strategies are treated, and assessments are made of the positive and negative aspects resulting from each. The present status of blacks and their continued quest for political empowerment will be analyzed.
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POLI 531  (3-3-0)  Public Policy and Administration: This course is a study of public policy processes. It examines what policies governments pursue and also why governments pursue such policies and the consequences of such policies. Several models including rational planning, group competition, political processes, institutional influences, etc., are used to describe and explain public policy. Case studies are also used to illustrate the realities of policy-making and policy implementation.
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POLI 535  (3-3-0)  Public Personnel Administration: This course examines modern theory and practice of personnel administration. The application of these theories and practices in the areas of recruitment, placement, career development, and in other phases of human resources management is covered. Recent issues arising from notions of comparable worth; implementation of affirmative action initiatives and from collective bargaining in the public sector represents topics for close analysis.
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POLI 610  (3-3-0)  Problems In Political Behavior: This course will provide the students with the ability to survey and analyze some of the major problems that citizens and political leaders encounter as they engage in the political process. Emphasis is placed on the process and role of political socialization, group dynamics, the activities and role of parties, the significance of movements, the frequency and importance of elections, the creation of public opinion and polling and the prevalence of the media.
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POLI 612  (3-3-0)  Seminar in American National Government: This course will provide students with the ability to examine critically major and recurring problems in American national government. Special attention will be placed on government plans and reactions in dealing with domestic and international problems, such as wars, other international crises and plans, depression and other economic aberrations, labor disputes, unemployment, budgetary crises, and official abuse of power.
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POLI 613  (3-3-0)  The Judicial Process: This course will provide students with the ability to examine and analyze the procedures and politics involved in the judicial process. Emphasis will be placed on all levels of the federal judiciary with special emphasis on the judicial process involving the Supreme Court. The process involving judicial selection, group litigation, internal procedure, precedent development, enforcement, and impact will be utilized as the means for examining the judicial process.
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POLI 620  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Europe: This course will examine the political and governmental structures, decision-making processes, cultural backgrounds, and ideological differences of some European nations. Special emphasis will be placed on comparisons of different political regions.
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POLI 621  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of the Far East: This course is designed to examine political and governmental structure, decision-making process, cultural background, and ideological difference of some nations in the Far East selected for study. Special attention will be paid to the roles played by the ruling elite of these nations in promoting economic development and prosperity. Concepts such as socialist guided market economy in China and North Korea and capitalist guided market economy in Taiwan and South Korea will also be examined in contrast to the free market economy in Japan.
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POLI 622  (3-3-0)  Government and Politics of Developing Nations: This course will examine the political and governmental structures, decision-making processes, cultural backgrounds and ideological differences of some developing nations selected for study. The course will also take into account such considerations as political, social and cultural underdevelopment, various types of economic dependency, and crisis of political and economic decay, with emphasis on problems and difficulties in developing democratic institutions in these developing nations.
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POLI 623  (3-3-0)  International Politics: This course is designed for students to explore some fundamental and persistent forces which mold the foreign policies of a nation state and institutions and manners of a nation state in which such foreign policies are carried out in terms of its relations with other nation states in the international community. The course will also assist students to examine various approaches to the study of international relations and the utilities of each approach.
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POLI 630  (3-3-0)  Administrative Law: This course is specifically designed to introduce students to important issues in Administrative Law. Through the use of the case method, the course is aimed at making the administrator more aware of the kinds of legal problems he or she is likely to confront. The emphasis will be on legislative, adjuratory and general policy-making process of administrative agencies. The nature of bureaucracy and procedural requirements for administrative policy-making and administrative regulation and deregulation are also examined.
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POLI 631  (3-3-0)  Financial Administration: This course is designed to introduce the student to financial management. Government exists to provide valuable goods and service that individuals or businesses are not willing to provide. As the government operates with limited resources, whether or not the commitment of governmental resources really improves the conditions of the community is subject to speculation and evaluation. Nevertheless, financial management impacts on all segments of community including acquisition and allocation of resources. Focus will be on governmental financial resources and management, budgetary theories and intergovernmental financial relations, and debt financing.
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POLI 632  (3-3-0)  Comparative Administration: This course focuses on exposing students to various types of governments, their structures, processes and policies, using a comparative analysis approach. Such studies provide intellectual excitement in the study of foreign systems and in the discovery of different political factors in the management and administration of governmental functions and operations.
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POLI 633  (3-3-0)  Problems in State and Inter-government Relations: This course examines some of the problems involved in the development, change and status of the powers, organization, functions, and interrelationships of federal, state, and local governments. The concept of new federalism and the impact of these new ideas on governmental relationship will be explored.
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POLI 634  (3-3-0)  Politics of the Budgetary Process: This course is a study of the political, economic and social influence on the budgetary process. The role of politics and of various actors and institutions involved in the process, historical changes in the concept of budgeting will be analyzed. Focus will also be on how and why individuals or groups respond in budgeting and financial settings as well as the impact of the budget on the economy and how budgetary decisions, in general, become an instrument for setting governmental priorities.
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POLI 641  (3-3-0)  Research Methods in Political Science: This course covers basic procedures for conducting research in political science. Special emphasis is placed upon research design, research strategies, approaches, and techniques. The selection and utilization of appropriate techniques for collecting, reporting, and analyzing data will be covered.
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POLI 643  (3-3-0)  Currents of American Political Thought: This course is an examination and evaluation of major currents of American political thought, their different viewpoints on the significant issues and problems at different times, their various interpretations of the Constitution, revolution, civil and natural rights. Emphasis will be on the contemporary liberal, conservative, radical debate on selected issues. While the respective historical, sociological and philosophical background and justification of the different schools of thought will be examined, the practical impact of these schools of thought upon politics and public policies in general at different times will also be analyzed.
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POLI 644  (3-3-0)  Contemporary Political Ideologies: This course is intended to examine the theory and practice of capitalism, socialism, democracy, anarchism, elitism, fascism, and communism. The welfare state will be examined also. Focus will be on comparison and contrast of significant philosophical and theoretical differences among different political ideologies as well as upon various schools of theory within any given ideology. The practical influence and impact of various ideologies as well as their historical and philosophical justifications will also be analyzed.
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POLI 646  (3-3-0)  Advanced Reading Seminar: Under the supervision of a designated professor, this course will provide students with the ability to select readings and conduct research in areas of special interest. Reading materials appropriate to each student's interest will be selected by the students. Selected bibliography outlining criteria for analysis of political literature and political research materials will also be required for examination and analysis.
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POLI 647  (3-3-0)  Thesis I: An original investigation in a subject approved by the student's Advisor and Thesis Committee. Detailed information on the preparation, form, organization and the defense of the thesis is presented in the Guide for the Preparation and Submission of Theses.
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POLI 648  (3-3-0)  Thesis II: Continued preparation of thesis under the direction of the advisor and Thesis Committee.
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POLI 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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PSYC 501  (4-3-1)  Research Design and Quantitative Methods: A study of experimental and correlational methods of psychological research, including single subject designs emphasizing the application of parametric and nonparametric statistical methods to psychological research.
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PSYC 505  (3-3-0)  Research Methods: A course covering the rationale, design, and methods of conductions psychological and counseling research.
Prerequisite: PSYC 500
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PSYC 509  (3-3-0)  Advanced Designs and Analysis: A study of advanced statistical inference, including the analysis of variance, multiple comparison techniques and multivariate models including multiple and partial regression, combined with advanced principles of research designs that fit these statistical models.
Prerequisite: PSYC 505
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PSYC 510  (3-3-0)  Research Design and Methods: A course covering the rationale, design and methods of conducting psychological research.
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PSYC 511  (3-3-0)  Applied Research Design and Program Evaluation: This course examines models of applied and evaluative research, the techniques, designs, and administration of program evaluation. Topics covered include entry issues, goal setting research for planning and implementation.
Prerequisite: PSYC 501
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PSYC 515  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Diversity: A study of the issues and influences of gender, sexual orientation and the major racial/ethnic and cultural groups in the United States on the theoretical and research paradigms in psychology and on clinical and counseling practices. The course expands students' frame of reference concerning human diversity and applies this knowledge of counseling and research issues in psychology.
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PSYC 516  (3-3-0)  Developmental Psychology: A study of the theories, principles, and concepts of cognitive, social, emotional and physical development of children and adolescents, with special emphasis on how they function in the family, school, and groups.
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PSYC 520  (3-3-0)  Behavior Therapies: A study of the principles of behavior therapies and their applications to behavior problems in various settings with an emphasis on behavior modification and cognitive behavior therapy.
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PSYC 525  (3-3-0)  Ethical and Professional Issues: A survey of the roles and responsibilities of mental health professionals; includes legal and ethical standards (ACA and APA) in professional practice, testing, and research. This course also reviews the professional identity and roles of counselors and psychologists.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
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PSYC 530  (3-3-0)  Theories of Personality: An in-depth study of the major theories of personality, including comparative analyses of the research support for the various theories.
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PSYC 540  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Health Psychology: This seminar will examine the links between medicine and psychology, including relevance of biological, personal, cognitive, developmental, social, environmental, and cultural variables to health and illness. Health, illness, health and illness behavior will be studied with the aim of greater understanding of health issues, the individual's relationship to these issues within individual, cultural, and cross-cultural contexts.
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PSYC 550  (3-3-0)  Psychopathology: A study of the etiology, symptomology, diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders, encompassing a multicultural perspective, with an introduction to and laboratory on the use of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
Prerequisite: PSYC 530 with a minimum grade of B Or PSYC 611 with a minimum grade of B
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PSYC 555  (3-3-0)  Cognitive Aspects of Behavior: A study of the theories, principles, and current research in the cognitive sciences in relation to basic psychological research and applications to counseling. Special emphasis is placed on information processing, memory and the interface between cognition and affect.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
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PSYC 570  (3-3-0)  Clinical Neuropsychology: This course will introduce students to the relationship between brain malfunction and behavior. The emphasis of the course will be the assessment and early diagnosis of lesions that disrupt brain functioning. Topics to be examined will include neuropsychological assessment of language disorders such as asphasia and anomia, disorders of visuo-spatial perception, brain injury, memory disorders, and dementia (e.g. Alzheimer's disease) . Other topics to be discussed include the teaching of intervention strategies for neurological disorders.
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PSYC 575  (3-3-0)  Biological Aspects of Behavior: A study of brain functions in relation to intelligence, speech, memory, emotions, and visual-spatial abilities, with attention to individual differences in both normal and brain-damaged persons.
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PSYC 600  (3-3-0)  Physiological Psychology: A study of brain functions in relation to intelligence, speech, memory, emotions, and visual-spatial abilities, with attention to individual differences in both normal and brain-damaged persons.
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PSYC 601  (3-3-0)  Biofeedback Techniques: A study of biofeedback training related to psychology, focusing on theories, significant research, and applications of biofeedback techniques.
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PSYC 603  (3-3-0)  Psychopharmacology: A study of the use and abuse of psychoactive drugs and their behavioral and neurophysiological effects in normal and clinical populations.
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PSYC 611  (3-3-0)  Theories of Counseling: An exploration of the philosophy and theories of counseling, the roles and responsibilities of counselors, practical ethics, and current issues in counseling.
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PSYC 612  (3-3-0)  Techniques and Process in Counseling: A study of the process and development of the essential skills and techniques used in counseling psychology. This course includes a laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: PSYC 611
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PSYC 613  (3-3-0)  Counseling in Community Settings: This course introduces students to the field of community counseling by studying the history and principles behind contemporary community counseling practice, the development of professional identity, and the acquisition of relevant skills and competencies. Topics covered include the role of community counselors, settings in which they practice, organization of community counseling programs, legal and professional issues.
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PSYC 614  (3-3-0)  Addiction and Substance Abuse Counseling: This course is a study of theory and evidence-based counseling practices related to the etiology, neuropsychology, symptoms (as identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), psychosocial correlates, and treatment of substance-related disorders. This course will incorporate an integrative perspective (e.g., person-centered, systems, cognitive behavioral, and multicultural). It will address issues related to dual diagnosis, explore relevant ethical and legal standards, and provide information on professional certification or licensure.
Prerequisite: PSYC 550 And PSYC 612
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PSYC 619  (3-3-0)  Cognitive and Intellect Assessment: Administration, scoring and interpretation of intelligence, memory and achievement tests with adults and children. Psychometric properties and report writing are covered.
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PSYC 620  (3-3-0)  Psychological Assessment and Testing: A study of the evaluation, selection, use, and interpretation of psychological tests in development, clinical and counseling settings.
Prerequisite: PSYC 612
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PSYC 622  (3-3-0)  Psychopathology: A study of the etiology, symptomology, diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders, encompassing a multicultural perspective, with an introduction to and laboratory on the use of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
Prerequisite: PSYC 511 Or PSYC 611
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PSYC 623  (3-3-0)  Personality and Psychopathology Assessment: Principles of trait measurement including the administration, scoring, and interpretation of objective tests (including the MMPI). Also covered are behavioral assessment techniques including direct observation approaches.
Prerequisite: PSYC 622
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PSYC 630  (3-3-0)  Techniques in Crisis Intervention: A study of the theory, skills, and techniques of emergency psychological intervention and counseling with persons experiencing intense situational and emotional distress.
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PSYC 631  (3-3-0)  Career Counseling: A survey of theories of vocational development, methods of developing a career information program, and procedures for providing interrelated personal, social, educational and vocational counseling.
Prerequisite: PSYC 612
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PSYC 632  (3-3-0)  Theory and Practices of Family Counseling: A study of the major theories and classifications of marriage and family counseling approaches and practices.
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PSYC 633  (3-3-0)  Techniques and Processes in Family Counseling: A study of the processes and development of essential skills and techniques applicable to family counseling. This course includes a laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: PSYC 632
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PSYC 634  (3-3-0)  Group Counseling: A study of the group counseling processes with emphasis on understanding the basic concepts and principles, and the development of group counseling skills through laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: PSYC 612
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PSYC 638  (3-3-0)  Perceptual and Cognitive Development: A study of the theories, principles, and research in cognitive and perceptual development. Special emphasis is placed on the interaction of perception and cognition and how they influence behavior, thinking, and decision-making processes in children and adults.
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PSYC 640  (3-3-0)  Social Aspects of Behavior: A focus on current research and theory in selected topics related to social psychology, such as attitudes, dehumanization, conformity, aggression, and effective group functioning and change.
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PSYC 641  (3-3-0)  Advanced Developmental Psychology: An in-depth examination of the principles, theories and research related to human growth and development. Survey and evaluation of the basic philosophies, recognized theories, and supportive research related to the growth and development of children.
Prerequisite: PSYC 516
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PSYC 642  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Aging: An in-depth study of the theories and research related to the processes in adult development and aging.
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PSYC 652  (3-3-0)  Principles and Techniques of Teaching Psychology: This course is designed to prepare psychology majors for the teaching of psychology at the junior and community college level and as teaching assistants. The course involves syllabus preparation, selection of instructional material, testing, evaluation, and demonstration lectures.
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PSYC 660  (3-3-0)  Genetic Aspects of Behavior: Fundamental mechanisms of genes and gene expression related to psychological processes. Genetic, environmental, and epigenetic induction of normal and pathological behavioral, cognitive, and emotional structure and function, including behavioral plasticity are examined. Human disorders and disease and application to genetic counseling emphasized.
Prerequisite: PSYC 500 And PSYC 575
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PSYC 671  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Selected Topics in Psychology: Special areas of psychological research and theory that are not traditionally offered in other graduate courses in psychology will be offered in a seminar forum. These offerings will be based on both student interest and need, and faculty experience, and proficiencies.
Prerequisite: Completion of 18 credit hours in graduate psychology program and permission of Instructor.
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PSYC 672  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Current Issues in Psychology: Intensive study of current topics in various areas of psychology. This course focuses on recent advances in major psychological theories, major methodological problems involved in utilizing various theories for experimental and applied research, ethical issues, and public policies.
Prerequisite: Completion of 18 credit hours in graduate psychology program and permission of Instructor.
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PSYC 680  (3-3-0)  Clinical Practicum I: A structured supervised experience in counseling practice, assessment and/or psychotherapy with clients at campus and/or local agencies. May be repeated.
Prerequisite: PSYC 611 And PSYC 612
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PSYC 681  (3-3-0)  Clinical Practicum II: A structured supervised experience in counseling practice, assessment and/or psychotherapy with clients at campus and/or local agencies. May be repeated.
Prerequisite: PSYC 680
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PSYC 682  (3-3-0)  Group Supervision in Counseling Practicum: Supervised counseling experiences in community services/settings. To be taken in conjunction with PSYC 680 (Counseling Practicum). Weekly seminars for consultation and discussion with a supervisor on topics such as case management and evaluation, referral procedures, ethical practices, and inter-professional ethical considerations.
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PSYC 683  (3-3-0)  Group Supervision in Counseling Internship: Advanced supervised counseling experiences in community services/agencies. To be taken in conjunct with PSYC 681 (Counseling Internship). Weekly seminars for consultation and discussion with a supervisor on such topics as professional ethics, cross-cultural counseling, enhancing treatment compliance, professional and client interaction, and confidential communication.
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PSYC 685  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: Individual study in an area of interest to student under the supervision of a psychology faculty.
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PSYC 691  (3-3-0)  Directed Study: Supervised research on a topic of choice approved by a committee of three faculty members, with an oral examination required.
Prerequisite: PSYC 500 And PSYC 510
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PSYC 692  (3-3-0)  Tests and Measurements: An intensive review of the theories and models underlying psychological tests and measurement procedures. The course will focus on the study of the psychometric properties of test instruments and the valuative criteria used to assess the reliability and validity of psychological measures.
Prerequisite: PSYC 390
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PSYC 693  (3-3-0)  Thesis Research: An extensive research experience in an approved topic of choice.
Prerequisite: PSYC 500 And PSYC 505
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PSYC 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students who have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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READ 512  (3-3-0)  Improvement of Reading Instruction: An introduction to fundamentals of reading instruction and remediation, including the skills essential to the early detection and treatment of reading problems.
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READ 513  (3-3-0)  Read Remediation and Practicum: A practical course in the design of reading programs appropriate to individual and group needs, with a practicum experience in the facilitation of individual and group reading activities. (Closed to students with equivalent undergraduate course work.)
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READ 516  (3-3-3)  Applied Phonics: An introduction to the essentials of phonics, with emphasis on applications to word identification and pronunciation in teaching children to read.
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READ 550  (3-3-0)  Reading in Junior and Senior High School: A lecture and laboratory course in the principles and practices of teaching reading at the junior and senior high school levels, with emphasis on means of assessing students' reading skills and on methods and materials for enhancing their reading abilities in the content areas.
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READ 551  (3-0-3)  Teaching Reading in the Content Area: A practical course in the principles and methods of reading instruction in content areas of the K-12 curricula.
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READ 552  (3-0-3)  Teaching Literacy Across Content Areas: This course provides an in depth study of reading comprehension strategies and study skills needed in order to read in the content areas. Different types of text, structures and features of expository (informational) texts, and a variety of reading strategies will be explored.
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READ 601  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Reading: A practicum course that develops skills in observing, recording, and analyzing children's reading and writing behaviors and implementing effective methods for teaching literacy to young children at risk or reading failure. Generates understanding of theories of reading and writing processes and of reading acquisition from an emergent perspective.
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READ 605  (3-0-3)  Investigations in the Teaching of Reading: Investigations of research studies on the reading process, including analyses and critical evaluations of the research, with particular emphasis on psychological principles and educational implications.
Prerequisite: EDUC 690
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READ 610  (3-0-3)  Foundations of Literacy: This course provides basic information about the reading process what it is how the child learns to read instructional strategies, and materials available for facilitating literacy teaching.
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READ 611  (3-3-0)  Foundations of Reading: A study of the fundamentals of the reading process, including instructional strategies, methods and materials for teaching reading, techniques for diagnosing reading problems, and methods of remediation.
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READ 618  (3-3-0)  Reading: The Learning Bases: An exploration of educational and psychological studies on the reading-learning process, with particular emphasis on applications to the teaching of reading and to remediation of reading-related problems.
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READ 620  (3-0-0)  Assessment and Evaluation of Reading Problems: This course provides a laboratory experience in studying, assessing, and evaluating, literacy problems and in developing plans for correcting reading problems.
Prerequisite: READ 610
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READ 621  (3-3-0)  Clinical Procedures in the Identification and Evaluation of Reading Disabilities: A study of the principles and practices of remedial instruction in reading, with practical experience in application of clinical procedures.
Prerequisite: EDUC 680 And PSYC 692 And READ 611 Or READ 605
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READ 622  (3-3-0)  Remediation of Reading Disabilities: A study of the principles and practices of remedial instruction in reading, with practical experience in application of clinical procedures.
Prerequisite: READ 621
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READ 623  (3-3-0)  Correction of Reading Problems: Provides a laboratory experience in analyzing, implementing, and utilizing specialized reading strategies designed to meet the literacy needs of problem readers.
Prerequisite: READ 620
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READ 644  (3-3-0)  Organization and Management of Reading Programs: An examination of the organizational planning and educational leadership basic to designing and implementing a district-wide developmental reading program for grades K-12.
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READ 698  (3-3-0)  Advanced Applied Product of Learning: This course has been designed to serve as a capstone or culminating experience for the Advanced Master's Degree Program in Education in all the specialization areas. This course will assist students in preparing the culminating activity and will encapsulate the total experiences in the program. It will provide a field-based context for the completion, presentation, and evaluation of the exit options: advanced professional portfolio, action research project, and thesis. (Other requirements related to the area of specialization, such as field experience component, may be required by the area of specialization.)
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READ 699  (3-0-3)  Seminar - Thesis: In-depth studies of issues in various fields of education, with conferences and discussions under the guidance of a major professor.
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SOCI 501  (3-3-0)  Death and Dying: A survey of the diverse issues that are topics in discourse on death and dying, the goal of this course is to provide the necessary skills and knowledge to prepare for personal and work experiences relevant to death and dying. Content includes examining psycho-social practices and organizational policies, and both personal and social problems related to death and dying. Topics also provide exposure to past, present, and future trends in mortality and the quality of life debates. Emphasis is on mortality in later life.
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SOCI 502  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Sociology: This is an advanced course in a topic of contemporary sociological interest. Topics vary and may be substantive, theoretical, or methodological. The course may be repeated under different subtitles.
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SOCI 503  (3-3-0)  Social Statistics: An introduction to descriptive and inferential social statistics, including parametric and non-parametric measures of association, tests of difference, probability and regression.
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SOCI 505  (3-3-0)  Applied Multivariate Statistic: An introduction to parametric, nonparametric and multivariate statistical techniques for the analysis of social research data and applications of such statistical techniques and sociological problems.
Prerequisite: SOCI 503
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SOCI 520  (3-3-0)  Demographic Tech and Analysis: A study of demographic principles, theories, techniques and methods as they relate to the population processes of mortality, fertility, and migration. The course also examines various demographic models like the Life table and techniques for population projections and estimates.
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SOCI 531  (3-3-0)  Aging and Social Policy: An advanced survey of social and public policy issues affecting the elderly. Subjects considered are age discrimination, public benefit programs for the elderly, voluntary and involuntary institutionalization, and a variety of political and informal issues confronting elderly individuals and society. The course provides intensive investigations of ongoing and emerging issues resulting from the growth in the number of elderly people. Issues will be examined for various social, professional and personal implications.
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SOCI 550  (3-3-0)  Modernization and Social Change: Examines the structural, institutional, and behavioral factors and processes affecting modernization in societies. Regional and comparative perspectives will be emphasized. Classical and contemporary theories and social changes will be examined.
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SOCI 555  (3-3-0)  The Sociology of Juvenile Delinquency: An exploration of the historical and contemporary theories of the causes of delinquency, and the social responses to delinquency. Topics include: The social and legal meaning of juvenile crime; the social and cultural factors promoting and inhibiting law breaking by juveniles; and strategies for prevention and control.
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SOCI 560  (3-3-0)  Advanced Sociological Theory: The purpose of this course is to expose students to the major theorists and theoretical orientations of the "Mid Twentieth Century" period. A major theme in the course will be the role played by ideology in the development of theory; and the assumptions underlying the various theoretical positions to be studied. Primary reading sources will be critically evaluated. The directions in which theory is moving today will be examined.
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SOCI 561  (3-3-0)  Feminist Sociology: This course examines the variety of feminist theories in sociology. It compares and contrasts feminist theories with traditional theories. It distinguishes between theories and theoretical perspectives in the attempt to determine the status of feminist scholarship in sociology. It is designed to expand and enhance students' understanding of theory and the social forces, which impact upon theory construction and research.
Prerequisite: SOCI 560
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SOCI 563  (3-3-0)  Race, Class, and Gender: This course will explore the various social explanations of the origin, nature and persistence of racial, ethnic, and social class and gender inequalities. The course will focus on an examination of how these factors intersect to create a system of unequal rewards and life chances in the contemporary United States.
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SOCI 570  (3-3-0)  Comparative Family Systems: A systematic study of family patterns in selected cultures from around the world including ethnic and minority families in the United States. The course emphasizes the theory and method of studying families cross culturally. Family systems will be analyzed by looking at features such as structure, gender roles, kinship patterns, and marital and family interaction.
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SOCI 580  (3-3-0)  Sociological Social Psychology: This course is designed as a graduate level overview of the study of sociological social psychology. This course provides an analysis of the major scientific propositions, concepts, research methods, and theories developed to explain the behavior of individuals in relation to other individuals, groups, and cultures. The course will explore the relationship between social structure and individual phenomena such as liking and attractions, helping behavior, self-definition, and social interaction, etc.
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SOCI 590  (3-3-0)  Advanced Social Science Research: A study of social science research methodology. The course covers survey research, sampling, techniques, questionnaire construction, data analysis, computer applications, and proposal writing.
Prerequisite: SOCI 335 And SOCI 503
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SOCI 591  (3-3-0)  Family Analysis and Research: This course provides analysis in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, research journal analysis, critique and evaluation, research design, and writing research reports related to family issues and special topics. This course explores the entire research process from conceptualization to writing and provides students with the tools to critically examine theoretical paradigms and methodological techniques in the field.
Prerequisite: SOCI 505 And SOCI 570 And SOCI 590
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SOCI 595  (3-3-0)  Formal Organization: This course is designed to provide analytical understanding of organizational theory. The course presents various perspectives and empirical works on organizations. Emphasis will be placed on theories and perspectives on formal organizations and structural variables of organizations (i.e., size, goals, effectiveness, power, institutionalization, etc.)
Prerequisite: SOCI 560 And SOCI 590
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SOCI 602  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: Individual study under the supervision of a member of the sociology faculty.
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SOCI 605  (3-3-0)  Seminar on Population Processes: A sociological study of the population processes of mortality, fertility and migration. The course takes an in-depth look at the factors influencing population processes and social, economic and political consequences of changes in these processes. The major theories and empirical literature on mortality, fertility, and migration will be reviewed.
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SOCI 608  (3-3-0)  Seminar in the Sociology of Health: A sociological analysis of health and the health care delivery system. The course is structured to help enhance understanding of the social and psychological dimensions of health and health care and the growing dominance of the medical profession. Contemporary issues and social policy implications will be examined as well.
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SOCI 610  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Education: Examines the American public school as a social organization. It focuses on the interrelations among social stratification, community power structure, school personnel, and the school. The course also analyzes the classroom as a social system and examines the emergence and nature of student culture.
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SOCI 614  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Aging: An analysis of the major theories, conceptual frameworks, social issues, and empirical research on aging the aged. The course is intended to show how the theory and methodology of sociology can be utilized to explain and predict social phenomena related to the aging process and the aged. Emphasis will be placed on the link between theory and research on aging to policy concerns of the aged.
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SOCI 618  (3-3-0)  Social Inequalities: This course will explore the various explanations of the origin, nature, and persistence of racial, ethics, social class, and gender inequalities. Various theoretical perspectives (e.g., functionalist, conflict, Marxist, sociobiological) will be discussed. The concepts of class, power, social status, and social honor and their interconnectedness will be examined. Social mobility will also be studied. Discussions will focus on capitalist societies and with the more recent changes in these societies.
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SOCI 620  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Race and Ethnic Relations: This course will examine the theoretical perspectives on majority-minority relations. The status and problems of various racial and ethnic minority groups will be studied. Patterns of majority-minority interaction will be covered. Particular attention will be paid to the socio-historical experiences of various minority groups.
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SOCI 624  (3-3-0)  Seminar on the Family: An advanced study of the family institution. Emphasis is on theoretical and conceptual frameworks as well as the major literature in the area. The course will provide students with a comprehensive survey of the substantive areas and methods used in the study of the family. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of theory, research, and policy concerns.
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SOCI 638  (3-3-0)  Seminar on Criminology and Deviance: A survey of the theoretical, methodological, and substantive issues in the study of crime and deviance. This seminar is designed to provide graduate students with a comprehensive survey of the substance and method of deviance and criminology; theoretical explanations of deviant and criminal behavior; major issues in the control and prevention of deviant and criminal behavior; and public policy issues and the criminal justice system. A general objective of the course is to locate the study of deviance and crime within the general sociological approach to social behavior.
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SOCI 640  (3-3-0)  Seminar on the Black Family: An examination of the black family as one of the basic social units in the structure of the black community. The diversity in black families as well as the socio-historical development of family patterns, attitudes, and customs will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on theoretical and methodological issues in the study of the black family. The course will also include an examination of the impact of public policies on black family functioning.
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SOCI 660  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Occupations and Professions: Analysis of various aspects of occupations and professions in American society, such as division of labor, status and ranking of occupations, occupational choice and career patterns, occupational socialization, and professional organizations.
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SOCI 685  (3-3-0)  Seminar on Teaching Sociology: The course is designed to prepare sociology majors for the teaching of sociology at the junior and community college level and as teaching assistants. The course involves syllabus preparation, selection of instructional materials, testing and evaluation, and demonstration lectures. A major objective of the course is the development of a "sociology toolbox" for the future. Special attention will be paid to issues on curriculum and course development in sociology.
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SOCI 690  (3-3-0)  Practicum: Involves the planning, implementation, and evaluation of individual projects in applied sociology.. Based on student interest, career plans, and available placements, students will be placed in a variety of settings for at least 10 weeks during the semester in which they are enrolled. A minimum of 12 contact hours per week will be required for a total of 120 hours.
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 graduate credit hours, including SOCI 503, SOCI 505, SOCI 560, and SOCI 590
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SOCI 691  (3-0-3)  Practicum II: Continuation of the practicum under the direction of the Practicum Committee.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: SOCI 690
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SOCI 695  (3-0-3)  Thesis I: An original investigation in a subject approved by the student's Thesis Committee. Detailed information on the preparation, form, organization, and defense of the thesis is presented in the Guide for the Preparation and Submission of Theses. The thesis in the Sociology MA Program involves the planning, implementation and evaluation of individual research projects. Based on student interest and or future career plans, students will work on a thesis during the semesters in which they are enrolled. Approval of the proposed project by a thesis committee recruited to serve as faculty advisors by the student is required prior to registering for the course. Additional information and consent forms are available from the Sociology Department.
Prerequisite: SOCI 505 And SOCI 560 And SOCI 590
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SOCI 696  (3-3-0)  Thesis II: Continued preparation of the thesis under the direction of the advisor and the Thesis Committee.
Prerequisite: SOCI 695
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SOCI 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students who have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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SPED 515  (3-3-0)  Teach Reading to Students with Disabilities: This course is designed to introduce students to the knowledge, skills and procedures needed to provide effective instruction for students with disabilities who demonstrate persistent reading difficulties. The course presents research-validated teaching principles, techniques and strategies that will provide a solid foundation on which to build an effective reading instruction program.
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SPED 518  (3-3-0)  Teach Mathematics and Writing to Student with Disabilities: This course will provide research-based content related to the mathematics and written language difficulties of students with mild to moderate disabilities along with research-validated best practices for teaching students with disabilities who exhibit these problems.
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SPED 522  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Learning Disabilities: A course exploring the etiology of learning disabilities, with emphasis on classroom manifestations of and treatment programs for children with learning disabilities, and with additional consideration of test patterns, differential functioning program planning and placement, and related research.
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SPED 523  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Specific Learning Disabilities: This course is designed to explore the definitions, characteristics, etiology, educational and social impact and intervention implications of specific learning disabilities on children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on identifying the research and best practices bases for identification and treatment of students with this disability.
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SPED 524  (3-3-0)  Working with Parents/Family of Handicapped Child: A study of theories and practices related to parent/family involvement in the education of the handicapped.
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SPED 528  (3-3-0)  Mainstreaming the Exceptional Child: A study of the theory, history, and practices associated with mainstreaming exceptional children, with emphasis on efforts toward overcoming problems related to educating exceptional children in a regular classroom setting.
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SPED 530  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Exceptional Children: A comprehensive survey of the various exceptionalities affecting learning: giftedness, mental retardation, emotional disturbance, learning disabilities, speech impairment, sight impairment, orthopedic impairment, autism, neurological and physical impairment, and cultural differences.
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SPED 532  (3-3-0)  The Gifted Child: An exploration of the nature of giftedness and creativity, including characteristics of gifted and creative children and approaches to encouraging the use and development of their abilities.
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SPED 535  (3-3-0)  Psychology of Mental Retardation: An intensive study of the psychological and sociological aspects of educationally handicapping conditions and of the children who manifest those conditions, with emphasis on integrating theory, research, and practice in effective program planning and implementation.
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SPED 536  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Mental Disabilities: This course involves the intensive study of the psychological and sociological aspects of educationally handicapping conditions and the individuals who manifest these conditions, with emphasis on integrating theory, research, and practice in effective program planning and implementation
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SPED 537  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Education of Emotionally Disturbed Children: An overview of the education of emotionally and behaviorally disturbed children, including history, philosophical issues, kinds of emotional disturbance, management of educational programming, types of programs, and professional roles for teachers.
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SPED 538  (3-3-0)  Advanced Studies in Behavioral/Emotional Disabilities: This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the area of study for the special education of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities. Major subject matter components include, but are not limited to, issues and trends, behavior management screening/assessment, programming and professional and family collaboration. The current status of this area of study is more directly linked to the present realities of our nation’s schools and its students than ever before. For these reasons the ability to apply research and instructional development skills in each major component of the discipline is very essential. Opportunities to plan, implement and evaluate programmatic, individual and intensive individual interventions will begin in this initial course offering within the area of specialization.
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SPED 560  (3-3-0)  Reading and Language Arts for Gifted Children: An in-depth study of curricula, methods and materials for teaching the language arts to gifted children, with attention to examining characteristics of the gifted, assessing their unique learning needs, and investigating aspects of creativity.
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SPED 579  (3-3-0)  Management of Learning Environments: A study of effective behavior analysis techniques for intervening in the environments of exceptional children to facilitate learning.
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SPED 580  (3-3-0)  Advanced Management of Learning Environments: Emphasis on effective behavior analysis techniques for intervening in the environments of exceptional children to increase learning. Includes examination and application of various models, approaches and techniques to provide positive behavioral supports for students and prevent discipline problems, where possible. Emphasis will also be placed on self-management and development of appropriate social-emotional skills.
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SPED 600  (6-0-6)  Practicum in Special Education: A ten-week supervised field experience in teaching exceptional children in an educational setting.
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SPED 610  (3-3-0)  Curriculum Development for the Gifted: A comprehensive view of the gifted learner and the implications of advanced learning ability for curriculum development, teaching/ learning models, and current educational environments.
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SPED 615  (3-3-0)  Issues and Trends in Special Education: This course is designed to provide a forum to discuss current issues related to the field of Special Education. Participants will explore effective approaches and strategies for managing issues in the creation of responsive learning environments.
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SPED 620  (3-3-0)  Teaching the Gifted Child: An overview of the features and procedures essential to designing, implementing, and facilitating an instructional program for gifted learners, with attention to strategies for counseling the gifted, issues-related topics in gifted education, and techniques for working effectively with parents, the community, and other advocates as resources for the gifted program.
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SPED 630  (3-0-3)  Consultative Internship in Special Education: A supervised experience in planning, implementing, and evaluating consultation projects involving exceptional and potentially exceptional students, educators of regular students, administrators, and parents.
Prerequisite Or Corequisite: SPED 649
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SPED 631  (3-3-0)  Teaching Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Academic Methods: A study of classroom educational procedures, including methods, curriculum and materials, for teaching students with developmental or academic/ learning handicaps, with emphasis on problems related to learning disabilities, mental retardation, and emotional disturbances.
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SPED 632  (3-3-0)  Teach the Hand Chld-Dev Level: A study of classroom educational procedures including methods, curricula, and materials for teaching birth-to-school-age students handicapped by developmental problems and for teaching older students with a mental age in the preschool range.
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SPED 633  (3-3-0)  Teaching Adolescents with Disabilities: A study of classroom educational procedures, including curricula, methods, and materials for teaching adolescent students (junior high through young adult) with disabilities.
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SPED 634  (3-3-0)  Curriculum and Effective Practices for Teaching Students with Mental Disabilities: This course is designed to provide an overview of the historical background, current developments and future directions for teaching children who are mildly and moderately mentally disabled. Emphasis will be placed on classroom procedures including methods, curriculum and materials for teaching the mentally challenged from K-12. Strategies and methods for use in the classroom to facilitate learning will be emphasized to include the use of technology for teachers as well as students.
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SPED 635  (3-3-0)  Curriculum and Effective Practices for Teaching Students with Specific Learning Disabilities: This course is designed to provide an overview of the historical background, current developments and future directions for teaching academic skills to students who have specific learning disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on classroom procedures including methods, curriculum and materials for teaching basic skills and content areas in grades K-12. Strategies and methods for integrating technology into lessons will be included.
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SPED 638  (3-3-0)  Teaching the Emotionally Disturbed Child: An examination of management techniques and educational planning and programming for emotionally disturbed children, with emphasis on the roles of the teacher and on the development of programs.
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SPED 639  (3-3-0)  Curriculum and Effective Practices for Teaching Students with Behavioral/Emotional Disabilities: The major framework for the course includes a research based examination of management and educational planning/programming for Children and Youth with emotional and behavioral disabilities. The course seeks to inspire and guide participants to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to match the complex and challenging roles of the teacher for the establishment of programs which reflect sound practices and which meet the needs of these children/youth. The course content focuses on teacher directed educational activities for managing and teaching students with mild to severe behavior and emotional problems; however, it ultimately seeks to prepare master educators who can effectively teach academic skills to children with diverse abilities.
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SPED 640  (3-0-3)  Master's Internship in Special Education: A supervised experience in basic and advanced teaching skills in special education. (Offered for variable credits, with a maximum of nine credit hours applicable to a graduate degree.)
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SPED 641  (3-0-3)  Advanced Internship in Special Education (Mentally Disabled; Behaviorally-Emotionally Disabled; Specific Learning Disabled): This course provides an intensive supervised field experience. It is designed to be the most appropriate for the student's qualifications, experience and future educational goals. Requires a minimum of 150 hours per semester. This is a practical application of the knowledge base of the educational professional as a facilitator of learning. Depending upon the student's qualifications, skill and experience, the intern will be supervised in one of two (2) of the following options: (1) in-service or classroom internship; or (2) special placement internship. The in service classroom internship option is primarily for currently employed teachers who were in regular or special classroom settings and serve the populations for which they are seeking licensure. The special placement internship option is an advanced field teaching arrangement. The student will provide direct service to MD or BED or SLD students. Students will receive on site supervision from both master teacher/site supervisor and a university instructor. (Offered for variable credits, with a maximum of nine (9) credit hours applicable to a graduate degree.)
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SPED 642  (3-3-0)  Exceptional Child Development: An examination of the relationship between human development and education, with emphasis on deviations exhibited by exceptional children in cognitive, linguistic, social, affective, perceptual, and neurological development.
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SPED 643  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Special Education: A graduate level seminar drawing from both theory and research for advanced study and discussions of critical issues in special education. (May be repeated for credit.)
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SPED 645  (3-3-0)  Independent Study in SPED: Independent research on critical issues in special education. (May be repeated for credit.)
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SPED 646  (3-3-0)  Advanced Assessment Practices in Special Education: This course is designed to provide teachers of children with learning problems with an opportunity to study and practice both formal and informal educational and diagnostic assessments that are appropriate for children and youth.
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SPED 647  (3-3-0)  Educational Assessment of Students with Disabilities: A practical study of both formal and informal diagnostic assessment and observational techniques for identifying and evaluating mild to moderate academic disabilities.
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SPED 648  (3-3-0)  Curriculum Development in Special Education: A practical course in the development and implementation of curricula for learning disabled, mentally handicapped, and behaviorally-emotionally handicapped students, with attention to the development of I.E.P's, the understanding and application of legislative directives regarding special education students, and applications of evaluation techniques for accountability.
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SPED 649  (3-3-0)  The Consultative Role of the Special Educator: A study of the theory, methods, and practices relating to the special educator's consultative role in the education of exceptional children.
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SPED 650  (3-3-0)  Leadership and Supervision of Exceptional Child Programs: A study of major issues in the supervision and leadership of educational programs for exceptional children, with emphasis on appropriate leadership styles, child advocacy roles, applicable state and federal legislation, due process and confidentiality requirements, personnel conflict management, qualifications and roles of special education staff, data-based decision-making, and provisions for least restrictive educational environments for exceptional children.
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SPED 660  (3-3-0)  Internship of Gifted Education: Supervised study and practice in the education of the gifted, requiring a minimum of 75 to 150 contact hours.
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SPED 698  (3-1-2)  Advanced Applied Product of Learning: This course has been designed to serve as a capstone or culminating experience for the Advanced Master's Degree Program in Education in all the specialization areas. This course will assist students in preparing the culminating activity and will encapsulate the total experiences in the program. It will provide a field-based context for the completion, presentation, and evaluation of the exit options: advanced professional portfolio, action research project, and thesis. (Other requirements related to the area of specialization, such as field experience component, may be required by the area of specialization.) (Offered for variable credits, with a maximum of six credit hours applicable to a graduate degree.)
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STAT 561  (3-3-0)  Probability Theory: A course including such topics as probability distributions, limit theorems, special functions, and probability models.
Prerequisite: STAT 301 or consent of department.
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STAT 562  (3-3-0)  Applied Regression Analysis: A course including such topics as matrix theory, correlation analysis, least squares, curve fitting, simple and multiple regression, response surfaces, and the applications of statistical software packages.
Prerequisite: MATH 251
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STAT 563  (3-3-0)  Design and Analysis of Experiment: The applications of statistics in the design and analysis of experiments. Topics will include: Principles of Design of Experiments, One-way Analysis of Variance, Factorial Designs, Hierarchical or Nested Designs, Linear and Multiple Regression Analysis, Two way Analysis of Variance, and other related topics.
Prerequisite: STAT 561
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STAT 564  (3-3-0)  Mathematical Statistics: Theories of distributions and statistical inference, Point and Interval Estimation, Tests of Hypotheses, Sufficiency, Completeness, and Unbiased Minimum Variance Unbiased Estimation (UMVUE'S) Interval Estimation.
Prerequisite: STAT 561
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STAT 571  (3-3-0)  Statistical Computing: A survey of some of the standard statistical software packages, like EXCEL, SAS, and SPSS.. These packages will be used to solve statistical problems.
Prerequisite: MATH 561
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STAT 572  (3-3-0)  Time Series Analysis: A discussion of the theoretical and applied aspects of Time Series. Topics include: Introduction to forecasting, Non-Seasonal Box-Jenkins Models and their tentative identification, Seasonal Box-Jenkins Models and their tentative identification, Estimation and diagnostic checking for Box-Jenkins models, Time Series Regression, Exponential Smoothing, Transfer Function Models, Classical Regression Analysis.
Prerequisite: STAT 561
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STAT 661  (3-3-0)  Advanced Probability Theory: A course including such topics as probability distributions, characteristic and generating functions, convergence and approximations, asymptotic sampling theory and decision functions.
Prerequisite: STAT 561
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STAT 662  (3-3-0)  Advanced Mathematical Statistics: Topics include parametric estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear models and nonparametric estimation, sufficiency, unbiased estimation, Bayes estimators, and the multivariate normal theory.
Prerequisite: STAT 661
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STAT 750  (3-3-0)  Topics in Statistics: A study of special and advanced topics in statistics within the scope of research interests of the instructor.
Prerequisite: STAT 662
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SWRK 510  (3-3-0)  Social Welfare Policy and Services: This course is an advanced study of the historical development of social welfare and the evolution of social work values and ethics. Emphasis is placed on the major fields of social work such as children and family services, mental health, health care, income maintenance, and corrections. Analytic frameworks with regard to social welfare policies and services are introduced. Frameworks identify strengths and weaknesses in the social welfare system with respect to multiculturalism and diversity. Policy at the national, state, and local levels, with emphasis on poverty, inequality; social and economic justice is addressed.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 515  (3-3-0)  Forensic Social Work: This course addresses working with criminals in clinics, prisons, juvenile and adult services, corrections, court mandated treatment and psychiatric hospitals for defendants being evaluated and treated on issues of responsibilities and competence to stand trial. As well, the course will address the related issues of working with the families of these offenders. Students will develop familiarity with the adversary process and the issues social workers confront in the civil and criminal justice system. This course also includes experiential learning from field trips. Students will interface/interact with the inmates and the prison staffs during these trips.
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SWRK 516  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice with Black Families: This course examines the past and current status of Black families and alert students to specific knowledge, skills values and strategies required to work successfully and culturally with the target group. It incorporates the study and analysis of problems and issues faced by social workers in working effectively with Black families, including the integration of theory, cultural factors, social work policy, human behavior and social work practice. A particular emphasis is placed upon greater understanding of the challenges and dynamics affecting practice with Black families, including economic and social justice, empowerment, and oppression. Additionally, from an empowerment and strengths perspective, this course will examine historically the capabilities and strengths of Black families and how such capabilities and strengths can be sued in effective social work practice with Black families.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540 Or SWRK 425
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SWRK 517  (3-3-0)  International Social Work: This course introduces students to the international dimensions of social work practice. Special attention is given to the present and future role of International social work professionals. Additionally, the role and responsibilities of United Nations, global human rights organizations, international aid agencies, intergovernmental and nongovernmental agencies are addressed. Students develop and understanding of poverty, violence, structural adjustment, debt crisis, migration, human rights issues, exploitation of children and women, other populations at risk, and social and economic justice issues within a global perspective. Also addressed are international aspects of domestic practice, policy formulation and advocacy from a global perspective.
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SWRK 520  (3-3-0)  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I: This course focuses on the physiological, cognitive, intellectual and emotional development of individuals. Theoretical explanations of human development over the lifespan are explored. Major social issues relating to human growth and development, ecological systems, culture, race, ethnicity, gender and socioeconomic forces as applied to the analysis of individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities are addressed. Focus will be given to oppression, privilege, and discrimination, and factors that help individuals and small social systems to change.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 525  (3-3-0)  Human Behavior and the Social Environment II: The course emphasizes social processes that transcend the individual, aiming to increase students' conceptual sophistication about the social context of human action and social work intervention. Within the person-in-environment framework, this course presents social theories and concepts that become tools for students' critical analysis of society, communities, social institutions and organizations, populations, and social structures, and cultures is a main component of the course. Special attention is given to human diversity and social inequalities.
Prerequisite: SWRK 520
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SWRK 530  (3-3-0)  Social Work Statistical and Data Analysis: This course is designed to develop understanding of probabilistic analysis, quantitative reasoning, and inferential statistics. Students are provided opportunities to do data analysis on the computer and concentrate on research and policy applications.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 540  (3-3-0)  Social Work Intervention with Individuals and Families: This course will introduce students to content on theories of assessment, intervention, diversity, evaluation and termination. Specific attention is given to the development of skills in communication, rapport building, interviewing, and the utilization of professional self in working with individuals and families. Multigenerational family life cycle is explored. Models of family therapy and other intervention approaches are reviewed. Challenges and concerns encountered by vulnerable families, low-income families, families of color, and nontraditional families are reviewed. The dynamics of small groups are emphasized. Students develop an understanding of how values and ethics impact social work practice.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 560  (3-3-0)  Applied Social Work Research Methods: Students apply quantitative and qualitative research to promote understanding of scientific, analytic, and ethical approaches to building knowledge for practice. Students learn to develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically based knowledge, including evidenced-based knowledge. The content prepares students to utilize research to provide high quality services, initiate change, improve practice, policy, and service delivery systems as well as evaluate their own practice. Major research designs are reviewed, and students develop skills in collecting, analyzing and using data. Sampling methods, data collection techniques, and statistical and graphical approaches to data analysis are emphasized. The course integrates themes related to multiculturalism, social justice, social change, prevention, intervention and treatment.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Social Work
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SWRK 570  (3-3-0)  Social Work Intervention with Groups, Communities, and Organizations: Social work practice with small groups, communities, and organizations are emphasized. Group membership, group goals and culture, group development stages, leadership roles and decision-making processes are explored. Theories and strategies for community and community organization development are examined. Students develop an understanding of the definitions, concepts, and roles of communities and community organizations. Major topics include community based planning, advocacy, governance, and residence participation.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540
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SWRK 574  (3-3-0)  Multicultural Practice with Diverse Populations: This course promotes understanding, affirmation and respect for individuals from diverse backgrounds. Students learn to recognize diversity within and between groups and gain understanding on how diversity may influence assessment, planning, intervention, treatment, and research. Students develop skills in defining, designing, and implementing strategies for effective practice with individuals from diverse backgrounds with respect to race, class, gender, color, ethnicity, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, and equality. The course integrates knowledge of cultures with particular emphasis on rural, urban, and military communities. Students analyze their own abilities to function as effective social work professionals in working with diverse populations. Attention is given to oppressed populations and social and economic injustice. Strategies for combating discrimination, oppression, and economic deprivation are addressed.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 580  (4-1-4)  Social Work Field Instruction I: This course is one of two courses that constitute the foundation field placement. The foundation placement is intended to help students develop basic knowledge and skills that provide the groundwork for their area of concentration. During this foundation placement students are in the field for 230 clock hours per semester. This amounts to two full days a week. Students are assigned to social service agencies and are supervised by experienced professionals. The field placement provides students the opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills within an agency setting and community context. Students will have experiences in working with individuals, families, groups, and organizations. The field placement is offered concurrently with seminar classes. Seminar will provide students an opportunity to enhance placement learning experiences by helping student further develop understanding of knowledge, skills, self awareness and professional use of self in advanced social work practice. Students may select rural or urban settings.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 585  (4-1-4)  Social Work Field Instruction II: This course is two of two courses that constitute the foundation field placement. The foundation placement is intended to help students develop basic knowledge and skills that provide the groundwork for their area of concentration. During this foundation placement students are in the field for 230 clock hours. This amounts to two full days a week. Students are assigned to social service agencies and are supervised by experienced professionals. The field placement provides students the opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills within an agency setting and community context. The field placement is offered concurrently with seminar classes. Seminar classes enhance placement learning experiences by helping student further develop understanding of knowledge, skills, self awareness and professional use of self. The field placement in conjunction with the seminar will provide students a series of assignments and tasks selected to complement foundation academic courses and provide a basis for generalist practice. Students may select rural or urban settings.
Prerequisite: SWRK 580
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SWRK 602  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: Individual study under the supervision of a member of the Social Work Program faculty.
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SWRK 605  (3-3-0)  Special Topics: This is an advanced course providing the students the opportunity to study new or advanced topics in social work. This course will vary according to the individual instructor and may be repeated under different subtitles.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 606  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice Seminar: This course will present content on theories of assessment, intervention, diversity, evaluation, and termination. Specific attention is given to the development of skills in communication, rapport building, interviewing, and the utilization of professional self in working with individuals and families. Multigenerational family life cycle is explored. Models of family therapy and other intervention approaches are reviewed. Challenges and concerns encountered by vulnerable families, low-income families, families of color, and nontraditional families are reviewed. The dynamics of small groups are emphasized. Students develop an understanding of how values and ethics impact social work practice. Content on social work practice with small groups, communities, and organizations are emphasized. Group membership, group goals and culture, group development stages, leadership roles and decision-making processes are explored. Theories and strategies for community and community organization development are examined. Students develop an understanding of the definitions, concepts, and roles of communities and community organizations. Major topics include community based planning, advocacy, governance, and residence participation.
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SWRK 608  (3-3-0)  Statistics and Research Seminar: A review of basic research methods and an introduction to basic statistics for social work. Students apply quantitative and qualitative research to promote understanding of scientific, analytic, and ethical approaches to building knowledge for practice. The content prepares students to utilize research to provide high quality services, initiate change, improve practice, policy, and service delivery systems as well as evaluate their own practice. Major research designs are reviewed, such as single system designs, and students develop skills in collecting, analyzing and using data. Sampling methods, data collection techniques, and statistical and graphical approaches to data analysis are emphasized. Students develop an understanding of probabilistic analysis, quantitative reasoning, and inferential statistics. Students are provided opportunities to do data analysis on microcomputers. The course integrates themes related to multiculturalism, social justice, social change, prevention, intervention and treatment.
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SWRK 610  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice with Families: This course critically evaluates methods used for assessing families of diverse, social, economic, cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. Students develop a knowledge base of theory, and models of family intervention. Family constellations are examined to include single parent families, extended and blended families, adoptive and foster care families, and gay and lesbian families.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540
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SWRK 615  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice in Mental Health: This advanced course focuses on social work practice with persons who have mental illness, and the impact mental illness has on families and society. Primary focus is on the therapeutic relationships, assessments, treatment planning, interventions, psychotropic medication, and case management. Students develop an understanding of the classification and diagnosis of DSM-IV.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540
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SWRK 620  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents: This course focuses on multiculturally competent social work practice with children and adolescents living in diverse family arrangements. The continuum of services and resources available to children and adolescents and the roles and functions of the social worker in these settings are examined. Economic, social, and psychological concerns of vulnerable children are identified, and intervention strategies that will effectively meet these needs will be addressee. Students are presented with specialized knowledge and skills essential for working with children and adolescents.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540
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SWRK 621  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice with Military Families I: Social work as it is practiced in the various branches of military service to include Army, Air Force, and Navy is examined. The history and role transitions of social work over the years with military families are explored. Ethical concerns that emerge from social work practice with military families are addressed. Military social worker' roles in mental health programs, medical settings, military operations, substance abuse programs, family advocacy, program administration, and policy-making are examined. Students compare and contrast civilian social work practice and military social work practice.
Pre-requisite: Graduate standing in social work.
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SWRK 622  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice with Military Families II: Students enhance knowledge and skills needed to work effectively with uniformed service members, veterans, and their families. There is discussion on how students demonstrate a professional demeanor that reflects awareness of and respect for military and veteran cultures and traditions. Students acquire further understanding of boundary and integration issues between military and veterans cultures and social work values and ethics. Knowledge of population characteristics and relevant physical health and mental health issues for current and former military is emphasized. Students acquire knowledge and skills in the interactive and reciprocal processes of therapeutic engagement, bio-psycho-social-spiritual assessment, and research-informed clinical interventions and programs.
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SWRK 625  (3-3-0)  Social Work with Chemically Dependent Families: Students study theory and knowledge on drugs and substance abuse as it relates to practice in social work settings. Dynamics of the chemically dependent family are assessed and culturally competent intervention approaches for working with the family system and subsystems use patterns will be discussed. Attention will be given to issues arising at different stages in the life cycle including recognition of signs of misuse.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540
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SWRK 626  (3-3-0)  Substance Abuse Intervention: This course facilitates students' understanding of the diverse needs of clients with substance abuse addictions. Students receive and overview of the dynamics of alcohol and other psychoactive drug addictions. Additionally, students evaluate the motivation and behavior patterns of substance abusers in a broad social context. Risk factors, education, and prevention are explored. Substance abuse assessment, intervention, relapse prevention are addressed.
Prerequisite: SWRK 540
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SWRK 627  (3-3-0)  Assessment and Evidence-based Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): The definition and history of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are explored. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of PTSD and acquire knowledge and skills on evidence-based interventions to mange and treat symptoms of PTSD. There is discussion on how to assess for PTSD symptoms and conduct interviews. The impact of PTSD on the development of substance abuse also is explored.
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SWRK 628  (3-3-0)  Assessment and Treatment of Suicidal Behaviors: Students acquire empirically grounded knowledge on suicidal behaviors, assessment, and evidence-based treatment. The significance of culture, race, and ethnicity with a special emphasis on military suicidal behavior are discussed. The impact of suicide on survivors is examined.
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SWRK 629  (3-3-0)  Social Work Practice and Traumatic Brain Injury: Students will develop knowledge and skills in counseling clients with traumatic brain injury. Students will acquire an understanding of TBI community resources and services. The physical, behavioral, cognitive, and emotional changes that can occur after a traumatic brain injury is discussed.
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SWRK 630  (3-3-0)  Assessment of Mental Disorders: Theories and concepts of mental health and illness are examined. Students are introduced to the Diagnostics Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Students study the etiology, symptomology, and treatment of mental disorders. The development of environmental, interpersonal, psychosocial and stress factors in human behavioral dynamics is explored.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in social work
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SWRK 635  (3-3-0)  Management of Human Services Organizations: This course focuses on management and leadership theories, administrative decision-making processes and organizational communication. Students develop ability for application of administrative concepts, theories and management principles in social work practice settings. Program planning and development, budget preparation, organizational development, and program evaluation, fund-raising and grant writing are emphasized.
Prerequisite: SWRK 570
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SWRK 640  (3-3-0)  Professional Writing for Social Work: Students will learn about scholarly writing through modeling the writing of published authors. This course will introduce students to why social work requires them to write using the American Psychological Association (APA) style. The ethics of writing, indicating the acceptable forms and practices of recognizing the ideas and intellectual properties of others will be explored in this course. The course will explore the concept of plagiarism. The course contains general conventions, such as how to refer to the work of others in the body of a paper and tips for avoiding sexist language. The course will provide the students the opportunity to avoid grammatical and punctuation errors commonly found in social work papers. The course will provide students the opportunity to participate in proofreading exercises that will direct them to their PC's to detect areas of potential problems. This course will provide students with a real-world option for communicating scholarly thinking and findings. The course will address the importance of the use of the Internet and the information it provides in writing research papers. The course will also offer suggestions for using computer technology effectively at various stages of the research process. The course and its assignments will encourage students to use resources outside the library, such as conducting interviews, surveys, and using media such as radio and television. Much of the course will take place in the library where students will review the literature and develop their proposals and complete the writing of their literature review.
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SWRK 650  (4-1-4)  Social Work Field Instruction III: This course is one of two courses that constitute the advanced placement in student’s area of concentration. The advanced placement is intended to help students develop expanded knowledge and skills in their area of concentration. During the foundation placement, students are in the field for 250 clock hours. This amounts to three full days a week. Students are assigned to social services agencies and supervised by experienced professionals. The field placement is offered concurrently with seminar classes. The field placement, seminar classes, and assignments are consistent with student’s chosen area of concentrations. Students will have the opportunity to use advanced practice skills with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. Students may select rural or urban settings.
Prerequisite: SWRK 585 Or SWRK 585
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SWRK 655  (4-1-4)  Social Work Field Instruction IV: This course is two of two courses that constitute the advanced placement in student's area of concentration. The advanced placement is intended to help students develop expanded knowledge and skills in their area of concentration. During the foundation placement, students are in the field for 250 clock hours. This amounts to three full days a week. Students are assigned to social services agencies and supervised by experienced professionals. The field placement is offered concurrently with seminar classes. The field placement, seminar classes, and assignments are consistent with student's chosen area of concentrations. Students will have the opportunity to use advanced practice skills with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. Students may select rural or urban settings.
Prerequisite: SWRK 650
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SWRK 690  (3-3-0)  Independent Research Project Seminar I: The course is designed to assist students in preparing their research projects. The course will focus around discussion of students selected topics chosen for the research project. Students will conduct and individualized but structured investigation of problem definitions, research methodologies and statistical analyses associated with research project.
Prerequisite: Completion of 31 graduate hours in social work, including completion of SWRK 530 And SWRK 560
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SWRK 696  (3-3-0)  Thesis I: This course is an advanced independent endeavor in the student's concentration area. Course involves an original investigation in a subject approved by the student's Thesis committee. Detailed information on the preparation, form, organization, and defense of the thesis is presented in the Guide for the Preparation and Submission of Theses. The thesis involves the planning, implementation and evaluation of a topic in the student's specialty area. Based on student interest and future career plans, students will work on a thesis during the semester. Approval of the proposed project by a thesis committee recruited to serve as faculty advisors by the student is required prior to registering for the course.
Prerequisite: Completion of 31 graduate hours in social work, including completion of SWRK 530 And SWRK 560
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SWRK 698  (3-3-0)  Thesis II: Continued preparation of the thesis under the direction of an advisor and the Thesis Committee. This course builds on research acquired in SWRK 696.
Prerequisite: SWRK 696
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SWRK 899  (3-3-0)  Thesis Noncredit: This course is required for students who have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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TESL 510  (3-3-0)  Theories and Principles in Teaching ESL: TESL 510 focuses on theoretical and practical approaches to the teaching of English as a second Language. This course demonstrates understanding of teaching ESL theories and skills through reading selections, teaching demonstrations, Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) activities, and field experiences. This course will prepare prospective or in-service teachers who will help Limited English proficiency (LEP) students.
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TESL 520  (3-3-0)  Second Language Acquisition: The multidisciplinary approach to the ways second languages are learned. Although child language acquisition is discussed, emphasis is on adult second language acquisition. The neurolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic bases of second languages are explored.
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TESL 530  (3-3-0)  Lit Dev and Assessment for English Learners: This course is designed to introduce and extend fundamental knowledge of theory and research in literacy development and strategies and techniques for effective literacy instruction for English Language Learners including and understanding of process of reading and writing in first and second language, literacy strategies, various assessments and materials available for facilitation the individualized teaching of literacy to help English Language Learners become independent readers and writers of English.
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TESL 541  (3-3-0)  Trends and Issues in Teaching ESL: This course explores trends and issues involved in teaching ESL students in the U.S. and teaching abroad. This course discusses the pedagogical issues in ESL/bilingual education and the trends in ESL teaching in the 21st century.
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TESL 550  (3-3-0)  Practicum: TESL 550, The Practicum in ESL, is an introduction to approaches and methods in ESL teaching through ESL classroom observation and classroom teaching experience that promote cooperation among ESL staff, classroom teachers, school administrators, and members of the community. This course emphasizes the development of specialists in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages who develop a high level of professionalism.
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ZOOL 570  (3-2-2)  General Entomology: A study of the morphology, life cycles, physiology, ecology, and behavior of hexapods, with course format including two lectures/discussions and two laboratory hours a week, and with laboratory studies devoted to insect identification, insect physiology, ecology, insect behavior, and individual student projects.
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ZOOL 585  (3-2-2)  Introduction to Parasitology: A study of the morphology, life cycles, and classification of parasites of various hosts, with course format including two lectures and two laboratory hours a week, and with laboratory studies devoted to the methods for the collection, culture, and microscopic preparation of parasitological materials.
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ZOOL 610  (3-2-2)  Advanced Genetics: To study the genomics, genetic analysis, gene expression and regulation, genetic mechanisms of evolutionary change, and genetic technologies.
Prerequisite: ZOOL 410 Or equivalent
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ZOOL 630  (3-2-2)  Advanced Developmental Biology: An advanced study of animal development, with emphasis on physiological and biochemical aspects, and with laboratory periods devoted to experimental work, literature reviews, and discussions.
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