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Graduate Catalog 2014-2015

CatalogGraduateCollege of Arts and SciencesSOCICourse Descriptions

Sociology Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

SOCI 500  (3-3-0)  Sociological Concepts: An advanced course in general sociology designed to give basic principles and interpretation of society, groups, institutions, and the basic social processes. The course is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the scope, theory, and methods of the discipline of sociology. It is intended primarily for those with limited experience in sociology.
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SOCI 501  (3-3-0)  Death and Dying: A survey of the diverse issues that are topics in discourse on death and dying, the goal of this course is to provide the necessary skills and knowledge to prepare for personal and work experiences relevant to death and dying. Content includes examining psycho-social practices and organizational policies, and both personal and social problems related to death and dying. Topics also provide exposure to past, present, and future trends in mortality and the quality of life debates. Emphasis is on mortality in later life.
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SOCI 502  (3-3-0)  Special Topics in Sociology: This is an advanced course in a topic of contemporary sociological interest. Topics vary and may be substantive, theoretical, or methodological. The course may be repeated under different subtitles.
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SOCI 503  (3-3-0)  Social Statistics: An introduction to descriptive and inferential social statistics, including parametric and non-parametric measures of association, tests of difference, probability and regression.
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SOCI 505  (3-3-0)  Applied Multivariate Statistic: An introduction to parametric, nonparametric and multivariate statistical techniques for the analysis of social research data and applications of such statistical techniques and sociological problems.
Prerequisite: SOCI 503 or an equivalent statistics course or permission of instructor
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SOCI 520  (3-3-0)  Demographic Tech and Analysis: A study of demographic principles, theories, techniques and methods as they relate to the population processes of mortality, fertility, and migration. The course also examines various demographic models like the Life table and techniques for population projections and estimates.
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SOCI 531  (3-3-0)  Aging and Social Policy: An advanced survey of social and public policy issues affecting the elderly. Subjects considered are age discrimination, public benefit programs for the elderly, voluntary and involuntary institutionalization, and a variety of political and informal issues confronting elderly individuals and society. The course provides intensive investigations of ongoing and emerging issues resulting from the growth in the number of elderly people. Issues will be examined for various social, professional and personal implications.
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SOCI 550  (3-3-0)  Modernization and Social Change: Examines the structural, institutional, and behavioral factors and processes affecting modernization in societies. Regional and comparative perspectives will be emphasized. Classical and contemporary theories and social changes will be examined.
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SOCI 555  (3-3-0)  The Sociology of Juvenile Delinquency: An exploration of the historical and contemporary theories of the causes of delinquency, and the social responses to delinquency. Topics include: The social and legal meaning of juvenile crime; the social and cultural factors promoting and inhibiting law breaking by juveniles; and strategies for prevention and control.
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SOCI 560  (3-3-0)  Advanced Sociological Theory: The purpose of this course is to expose students to the major theorists and theoretical orientations of the "Mid Twentieth Century" period. A major theme in the course will be the role played by ideology in the development of theory; and the assumptions underlying the various theoretical positions to be studied. Primary reading sources will be critically evaluated. The directions in which theory is moving today will be examined.
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SOCI 561  (3-3-0)  Feminist Sociology: This course examines the variety of feminist theories in sociology. It compares and contrasts feminist theories with traditional theories. It distinguishes between theories and theoretical perspectives in the attempt to determine the status of feminist scholarship in sociology. It is designed to expand and enhance students' understanding of theory and the social forces, which impact upon theory construction and research.
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SOCI 563  (3-3-0)  Race, Class, and Gender: This course will explore the various social explanations of the origin, nature and persistence of racial, ethnic, and social class and gender inequalities. The course will focus on an examination of how these factors intersect to create a system of unequal rewards and life chances in the contemporary United States.
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SOCI 570  (3-3-0)  Comparative Family Systems: A systematic study of family patterns in selected cultures from around the world including ethnic and minority families in the United States. The course emphasizes the theory and method of studying families cross culturally. Family systems will be analyzed by looking at features such as structure, gender roles, kinship patterns, and marital and family interaction.
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SOCI 580  (3-3-0)  Sociological Social Psychology: This course is designed as a graduate level overview of the study of sociological social psychology. This course provides an analysis of the major scientific propositions, concepts, research methods, and theories developed to explain the behavior of individuals in relation to other individuals, groups, and cultures. The course will explore the relationship between social structure and individual phenomena such as liking and attractions, helping behavior, self-definition, and social interaction, etc.
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SOCI 590  (3-3-0)  Advanced Social Science Research: A study of social science research methodology. The course covers survey research, sampling, techniques, questionnaire construction, data analysis, computer applications, and proposal writing.
Prerequisite: SOCI 335 And SOCI 503 Or equivalent statistics courses or permission of instructor
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SOCI 591  (3-3-0)  Family Analysis and Research: This course provides analysis in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, research journal analysis, critique and evaluation, research design, and writing research reports related to family issues and special topics. This course explores the entire research process from conceptualization to writing and provides students with the tools to critically examine theoretical paradigms and methodological techniques in the field.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
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SOCI 595  (3-3-0)  Formal Organization: This course is designed to provide analytical understanding of organizational theory. The course presents various perspectives and empirical works on organizations. Emphasis will be placed on theories and perspectives on formal organizations and structural variables of organizations (i.e., size, goals, effectiveness, power, institutionalization, etc.)
Prerequisite: SOCI 560 And SOCI 590
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SOCI 602  (3-3-0)  Independent Study: Individual study under the supervision of a member of the sociology faculty.
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SOCI 605  (3-3-0)  Seminar on Population Processes: A sociological study of the population processes of mortality, fertility and migration. The course takes an in-depth look at the factors influencing population processes and social, economic and political consequences of changes in these processes. The major theories and empirical literature on mortality, fertility, and migration will be reviewed.
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SOCI 608  (3-3-0)  Seminar in the Sociology of Health: A sociological analysis of health and the health care delivery system. The course is structured to help enhance understanding of the social and psychological dimensions of health and health care and the growing dominance of the medical profession. Contemporary issues and social policy implications will be examined as well.
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SOCI 610  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Education: Examines the American public school as a social organization. It focuses on the interrelations among social stratification, community power structure, school personnel, and the school. The course also analyzes the classroom as a social system and examines the emergence and nature of student culture.
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SOCI 614  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Aging: An analysis of the major theories, conceptual frameworks, social issues, and empirical research on aging the aged. The course is intended to show how the theory and methodology of sociology can be utilized to explain and predict social phenomena related to the aging process and the aged. Emphasis will be placed on the link between theory and research on aging to policy concerns of the aged.
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SOCI 618  (3-3-0)  Social Inequalities: This course will explore the various explanations of the origin, nature, and persistence of racial, ethics, social class, and gender inequalities. Various theoretical perspectives (e.g., functionalist, conflict, Marxist, sociobiological) will be discussed. The concepts of class, power, social status, and social honor and their interconnectedness will be examined. Social mobility will also be studied. Discussions will focus on capitalist societies and with the more recent changes in these societies.
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SOCI 620  (3-3-0)  Seminar in Race and Ethnic Relations: This course will examine the theoretical perspectives on majority-minority relations. The status and problems of various racial and ethnic minority groups will be studied. Patterns of majority-minority interaction will be covered. Particular attention will be paid to the socio-historical experiences of various minority groups.
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SOCI 624  (3-3-0)  Seminar on the Family: An advanced study of the family institution. Emphasis is on theoretical and conceptual frameworks as well as the major literature in the area. The course will provide students with a comprehensive survey of the substantive areas and methods used in the study of the family. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of theory, research, and policy concerns.
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SOCI 638  (3-3-0)  Seminar on Criminology and Deviance: A survey of the theoretical, methodological, and substantive issues in the study of crime and deviance. This seminar is designed to provide graduate students with a comprehensive survey of the substance and method of deviance and criminology; theoretical explanations of deviant and criminal behavior; major issues in the control and prevention of deviant and criminal behavior; and public policy issues and the criminal justice system. A general objective of the course is to locate the study of deviance and crime within the general sociological approach to social behavior.
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SOCI 640  (3-3-0)  Seminar on the Black Family: An examination of the black family as one of the basic social units in the structure of the black community. The diversity in black families as well as the socio-historical development of family patterns, attitudes, and customs will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on theoretical and methodological issues in the study of the black family. The course will also include an examination of the impact of public policies on black family functioning.
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SOCI 660  (3-3-0)  Sociology of Occupations and Professions: Analysis of various aspects of occupations and professions in American society, such as division of labor, status and ranking of occupations, occupational choice and career patterns, occupational socialization, and professional organizations.
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SOCI 685  (3-3-0)  Seminar on Teaching Sociology: The course is designed to prepare sociology majors for the teaching of sociology at the junior and community college level and as teaching assistants. The course involves syllabus preparation, selection of instructional materials, testing and evaluation, and demonstration lectures. A major objective of the course is the development of a "sociology toolbox" for the future. Special attention will be paid to issues on curriculum and course development in sociology.
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SOCI 690  (3-3-0)  Practicum: Involves the planning, implementation, and evaluation of individual projects in applied sociology. Based on student interest, career plans, and available placements, students will be placed in a variety of settings for at least 10 weeks during the semester in which they are enrolled. A minimum of 12 contact hours per week will be required for a total of 120 hours.
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 graduate credit hours, including SOCI 503 And SOCI 560 And SOCI 590
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SOCI 691  (3-0-3)  Practicum II: Continuation of the practicum under the direction of the Practicum Committee.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SOCI 690
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SOCI 695  (3-0-3)  Thesis I: An original investigation in a subject approved by the student's Thesis Committee. Detailed information on the preparation, form, organization, and defense of the thesis is presented in the Guide for the Preparation and Submission of Theses. The thesis in the Sociology MA Program involves the planning, implementation and evaluation of individual research projects. Based on student interest and or future career plans, students will work on a thesis during the semesters in which they are enrolled. Approval of the proposed project by a thesis committee recruited to serve as faculty advisors by the student is required prior to registering for the course. Additional information and consent forms are available from the Sociology Department.
Prerequisite: SOCI 503 And SOCI 560 And SOCI 590
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SOCI 696  (3-3-0)  Thesis II: Continued preparation of the thesis under the direction of the advisor and the Thesis Committee.
Prerequisite: SOCI 695
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SOCI 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students who have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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