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DRAFT Graduate Catalog 2014-2015 DRAFT

CatalogGraduateCollege of Arts and SciencesENGLCourse Descriptions

English Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

ENGL 502  (3-3-0)  Forms of Fiction: A study of the short story and novel as genre. The course will deal with the history and development of both forms in American, British, and Continental literature from the beginning until the modernist movement. Emphasis will be placed upon narrative theory and the rhetoric of fiction.
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ENGL 503  (3-3-0)  Drama: A course in the reading of Western Drama from its Greek beginnings through the Renaissance and Modern Period, emphasizing the conventions and modes of drama as literature, the aesthetics of mimesis, terms, historical background, theme, and structure. The course will include readings from the Greek tragedy and comedy, Shakespeare, mixed forms like tragicomedy, Restoration comedy, and examples of Modern Drama from Ibsen to Beckett.
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ENGL 505  (3-3-0)  The Lyric: The Lyric as Song in English and American poetry is a comprehensive literature course designed to acquaint the student with representative poems in English and American literature from the medieval period in England to the twentieth century in England and America and to familiarize students with the dominant forms, sub-genres, prosodic and metrical structures, rhythm patterns, motifs, and subjective voices employed by representative English and American poets of the inclusive periods. This study will concentrate on the correlations between sound and sense, and on the music of the verse. This course will provide students with an extensive practical, theoretical, and prosodic background. An analysis of the music, themes, and structures of lyric poems will provide a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the musical elements of verse and of lyric poems in particular.
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ENGL 507  (3-3-0)  Bibliography and Methods of Research: This course will introduce students to the graduate study of English language and literature. Study will center on both the integrity of individual texts and the historic, economic, social, and political factors that may have influenced literature and language. The development of printing and publishing, conventional style manuals, and central works of the twentieth century will be considered in order to provide an understanding of editorial standards and textual research.
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ENGL 508  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Linguistics: This course provides students with the terminology and elementary concepts of linguistics. Students will separate linguistic science from myths. The course identifies linguistic markers in both literary and everyday language. The raw material of language will be studied as resources for art, i.e. poetry. The course will delineate some of the issues in contemporary linguistics. Although not primarily a course on pedagogy, this course will from time to time apply linguistic principles to the teaching of English language and literature.
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ENGL 509  (3-3-0)  Sociolinguistics and Pragmatics: Sociolinguistics is the study of language in society, including dialectology, gender issues, politeness, language policy, and pedagogy. Pragmatics is the study of communication in context, including deixis, implicature, speech acts, metaphor, and other tropes.
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ENGL 511  (3-3-0)  Tragic Vision: A course in the readings of the tragic in drama, fiction, and poetry. The course will examine versions of the tragic experience, pathos in contrast to tragedy, the hero, and the possibilities of transcendence in tragedy. The course will study the tragic vision in Greek tragedy, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Yeats, and Beckett. It will look for the tragic in, for example, the fiction of Conrad and Mann, and in, for example, the poetry of Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Dickinson, Yeats, and Plath.
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ENGL 515  (3-3-0)  History of Criticism and Literary Theory: This course will provide students with a familiarity with the traditional texts of Western literary theory and criticism. The second half of the course will concentrate on contemporary trends in literary criticism (beginning approximately with Oscar Wilde), which are often reactions against more traditional notions. Often the course will introduce concepts that are, or seem to be, counterintuitive.
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ENGL 516  (3-3-0)  Issues in Composition Instruction: This course will be concerned with current theories in writing and revising compositions. Particular attention will be paid to composition as a process, ultimately leading to a product. The course will also examine writers including basic/inexperienced writers and their problems. Students in this course will seek and discover information and techniques that will aid them in functioning as facilitators of writing.
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ENGL 517  (3-3-0)  Issues in Teaching Literature: The course will provide a basic introduction to the teaching of literature in its four main forms: fiction, poetry, drama, and film. The concept of documentary narrative in relation to these four will be examined as well. Genre and subgenre will also be considered as means of grouping texts. Particular attention will be paid to the relative appropriateness of teaching the different forms of literature at different age and ability levels. Questions of canon will be considered in order to relate gender, race, and ethnicity to the secondary curriculum. Finally, the relation of literary criticism and critical theory to the teaching of the four forms will be considered.
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ENGL 518  (3-3-1)  Technology in the Teaching of English: The course will provide students with the ability to use computers and multimedia to enhance the language arts classroom. Word processing and composition; the use of style checkers and editing programs, computer-assisted and computer-managed instruction, multimedia, and social media will be examined in the light of recent research into their effectiveness as pedagogical tools. Students will design and implement a syllabus for a computer intensive language arts course.
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ENGL 531  (3-3-0)  Literature of the South: This course examines literature emanating from the American South, covering the colonial and antebellum period through the Civil War and its aftermath into the early Twentieth Century and the Southern Renascence, culminating with a view of the contemporary Southern literary landscape. The course will use literary works and other material to examine how the South differs from other regions of the nation as it attempts to define "Southern literature." In addition, the course will examine Southern literature to discover its beliefs, values, and ideals and to explore the literary tradition of the modern South.
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ENGL 533  (3-3-0)  Approach to Reading African-American Literature: This course will explore formal modes, figurations, and traditions in African-American writings. The course will analyze ways in which African-American cultural codes produce and reproduce value and meaning. Primary focus includes vernacular theories, performance theories, "womanist" perspectives, and new historicism. The course will include culturally specific aspects of African- American writings and culture, showing how the black tradition has inscribed its own theories of rhetorical systems. The course will consider the slave narrative tradition as it is reflected in different periods by such writers as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Richard Wright, and Toni Morrison. A New Historicist approach to reading will give attention to how historical discourse displays the surrounding ideology. A consideration of the "black aesthetic" will emphasize the performance of African-American writings.
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ENGL 534  (3-3-0)  Women and Literature: This course surveys many of the most important literary texts written by women. The course explores and analyzes the cultural assumptions embedded in literature about women written by men and women. The course examines the social, political, ideological, and economic matrices of both the production and readership of literature. It gives special attention to women's revaluations and revisions of those matrices. The course discusses the varieties of contemporary feminist theory and criticism. The course also applies feminist contributions to the more important contemporary developments in literary theory and criticism: reader-response theory, structuralism and deconstruction, the new historicism, and the debate over canon formation.
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ENGL 540  (3-3-0)  English Phonology and Morphology: An introduction to the phonology (sound system) and morphology (word formation) of English. Primary emphasis will be on Standard English, but others varies of English will be considered. Pedagogical approaches on phonology and morphology will be a component of the course.
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ENGL 542  (3-3-0)  Advanced Creative Writing: An intensive seminary devoted to the creation and revision of original creative writing. Genre focus will vary each semester and will alternate between poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and children’s literature.
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ENGL 544  (3-3-0)  Advanced Business Writing: This course explores the principles of effective writing in business and administration with special focus on developing correspondence, reports, proposals, presentations, flyers and other business documents, as well as researching issues related to business communication, including ethical, legal, and cross-cultural contemporary concerns.
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ENGL 545  (3-3-0)  Advanced Technical Writing: This course explores effective writing in technical genres, with a focus on adjusting content, organization and style for various audiences including peer, managerial, and lay audiences. Students will examine and produce various technical documents, such as instructions or manuals and reports, and engage in usability testing and revisions of documents.
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ENGL 623  (3-3-0)  Medieval English Literature: The course will survey literature written in Middle English. Most texts will be read in Middle English. It will not include Chaucer, although it does assume a prior acquaintance with Chaucer. The course will trace the Continental and Old English antecedents of Middle English literature. It will consider the social, political, and economic matrices of Middle English literature. It will observe the interpenetration of religious and secular Middle English, literary texts using the new critical and theoretical approaches, especially feminism, neo-historicism, and reader-response theory.
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ENGL 630  (3-3-0)  Modern Novel: A study of the major novels and novelists of the Modernist movement from the late 19th century to the present. The texts will be analyzed through close reading, attempting to make aesthetic connections among the works, and to examine the social and political context in which the works were produced. An attempt will be made to derive a definition of what Modernism was and is and how it shaped the consciousness of contemporary man. The novels will be discussed as reactions to the thematic concerns and resolutions of more traditional early fictions; the complexity of modernist works will be seen as a natural reaction to the complex vision of man, which late 19th and early 20th century writers inherited. Among the writers to be studied are the following: Dostoyevsky, Kafka, Flaubert, Lawrence, Forster, and Dos Passos.
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ENGL 632  (3-3-0)  Special Topics: A study of major tradition, period, or author; or of current issues in literature, rhetoric, or professional writing. This course will vary according to the issues in literature, rhetoric, or professional writing. This course will vary according to the expertise of the individual instructor and may be repeated for credit under different subtitles.
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ENGL 636  (3-3-0)  Seminar in American Literature: The seminar in American literature will examine the works and influence of an individual author, the literary output of a number of different authors, or a particular literary period, such as the Harlem Renaissance, or a literary movement, such as the American Romanticism. Though the specific content of the course may vary, the seminar will be an intensive examination and interpretation of selected texts, as opposed to a survey of many. The course is designed to limit the scope of the material covered so that students can closely examine from various literary perspectives a few key texts. The format emphasizes class members leading the discussion, doing independent research, and exchanging the results of their research. This course will vary according to the expertise of the individual instructor and may be repeated for credit under different subtitles.
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ENGL 637  (3-3-0)  Seminar in British Literature: The seminar in British literature will focus on an individual writer, a small corpus of works by several different writers, or a theme developed by a series of British writers (e.g., social revolt in modern literature, the social status of the hero in epic, medieval, and modern narrative poetry, the sea in British literature, the private self through the "stream of consciousness," Medieval literature, English, Renaissance, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, post-modern literature, Spenser, Shaw, Joyce, or Woolf.) The seminar will be an intense and close reading and interpretation of selected texts, rather than a survey of many. The purpose of a seminar is to limit the scope of the material covered in order for students to scrutinize from many different literary perspectives a few key texts in British literature. The format is mainly directed discussion with class members leading the discussion, doing independent research, and exchanging results of their research. This course will vary according to the expertise of the individual instructor and may be repeated for credit under different subtitles.
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ENGL 638  (3-3-0)  Thesis I: An original investigation in a subject approved by the student's thesis committee. Detailed information on the preparation, form, and defense of the thesis is presented in the Guide for the Preparation and Submission of Theses.
Prerequisite: ENGL 507 And ENGL 515
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ENGL 639  (3-3-0)  Thesis II: Continued preparation of the thesis under the direction of the advisor and the thesis committee.
Prerequisite: ENGL 507 And ENGL 515
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ENGL 899  (0-0-0)  Thesis Non-Credit: This course is required for students that have completed their course work and the number of thesis hours for credit required in their graduate degree program. Students who will continue to use University resources in completing their thesis must enroll in this course.
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TESL 510  (3-3-0)  Theories and Principles in Teaching ESL: TESL 510 focuses on theoretical and practical approaches to the teaching of English as a second Language. This course demonstrates understanding of teaching ESL theories and skills through reading selections, teaching demonstrations, Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) activities, and field experiences. This course will prepare prospective or in-service teachers who will help Limited English proficiency (LEP) students.
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TESL 520  (3-3-0)  Second Language Acquisition: The multidisciplinary approach to the ways second languages are learned. Although child language acquisition is discussed, emphasis is on adult second language acquisition. The neurolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic bases of second languages are explored.
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TESL 530  (3-3-0)  Lit Dev and Assessment for English Learners: This course is designed to introduce and extend fundamental knowledge of theory and research in literacy development and strategies and techniques for effective literacy instruction for English Language Learners including and understanding of process of reading and writing in first and second language, literacy strategies, various assessments and materials available for facilitation the individualized teaching of literacy to help English Language Learners become independent readers and writers of English.
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TESL 541  (3-3-0)  Trends and Issues in Teaching ESL: This course explores trends and issues involved in teaching ESL students in the U.S. and teaching abroad. This course discusses the pedagogical issues in ESL/bilingual education and the trends in ESL teaching in the 21st century.
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TESL 550  (3-3-0)  Practicum: TESL 550, The Practicum in ESL, is an introduction to approaches and methods in ESL teaching through ESL classroom observation and classroom teaching experience that promote cooperation among ESL staff, classroom teachers, school administrators, and members of the community. This course emphasizes the development of specialists in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages who develop a high level of professionalism.
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